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NM ANTHONETTE CAYEDITO: Missing from Gallup, NM - 6 April 1986 - Age 9

Discussion in 'Missing 1980 to 1989' started by Scorpio, Jul 13, 2016.

  1. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 14, 2016
    KareBear, Whatsnext, spike and 4 others like this.
  2. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/c/cayedito_anthonette.html


    Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance


    • Missing Since: April 6, 1986 from Gallup, New Mexico
    • Classification: Non-Family Abduction
    • Date Of Birth: December 25, 1976
    • Age: 9 years old
    • Height and Weight: 4'7, 55 pounds
    • Distinguishing Characteristics: Biracial (Caucasian/Native American) female. Black hair, brown eyes. Anthonette has dark-colored moles on her right cheek, nose, back and one of her ankles. She has scars on one of her knees and on her lip. Her ears are pierced. Some agencies give her name as "Antoinette." Anthonette is of Navajo and Italian descent.
    • Clothing/Jewelry Description: A knee-length pink nightgown.

    Details of Disappearance

    Anthonette was last seen inside her family's residence in the 200 block of Arnold Street off Route 66 in Gallup, New Mexico on April 6, 1986. Her sister told authorities that Anthonette opened the front door after an unidentified male knocked at approximately 3:00 a.m. Her sister reported that the man claimed to be their Uncle Joe. He allegedly grabbed Anthonette as she opened the door and forced her into a vehicle. Anthonette has never been heard from again. Her mother, who was asleep in the residence, didn't hear the knock on the door and didn't realize Anthonette was missing until approximately 7:00 a.m., when she went to wake up her children. Authorities questioned Anthonette's uncle regarding her disappearance, but he is not considered a suspect and was never thought to be involved in her abduction.
    About a year after Anthonette disappeared, the Gallup Police Department got a phone call from someone who said she was Anthonette and she was in Albuquerque. Before they could trace the call, the police heard an angry-sounding male voice say, "Who said you could use the phone?" They heard the sound of a scuffle and a scream, then the line went dead. Four years later, a waitress in Carson City, Nevada thought she saw Anthonette. She described as a girl in her early teens who was sitting with an "unkempt" couple. The girl kept dropping her fork and, each time the waitress picked it up for her, she squeezed the waitress's hand. After they all left, someone found a note under the girl's plate that read "Help me! Call police." It has not been confirmed that the person who called the police or the girl in the restaurant was Anthonette.

    Anthonette's case remains unsolved. Investigators believe foul play may have been involved in her disappearance and that she is deceased.



    Investigating Agency
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:
    Gallup Police Department
    505-863-9365
     
    KareBear, Whatsnext, spike and 3 others like this.
  3. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

  4. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    https://owlcation.com/social-sciences/missing-disappeared-unsolved-mysteries-anthonette-cayedito

    [​IMG]
    Approximately a year after Anthonette disappeared, the Gallup Police Department got a phone call from someone who identified themselves as Anthonette Cayedito and reported that she was in Albuquerque. Before they could trace the call, the police heard an angry-sounding male voice say, "Who said you could use the phone?" They heard the sound of a scuffle and a scream, then the line went dead. The phone call can be heard in the clip above.

    Four years later, a waitress in Carson City, Nevada thought she saw Anthonette. She described as a girl in her early teens who was sitting with an "unkempt" couple. The girl kept dropping her fork and, each time the waitress picked it up for her, she squeezed the waitress's hand. After they all left, someone found a note under the girl's plate that read "Help me! Call police."

    There also has been reported sightings of Anthonette being seen from Canada to New York, to Texas.
     
    KareBear, patsella, spike and 3 others like this.
  5. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    Here is an article from the local newspaper about Anthonette's disappearance in 2010:


    Where is Anthonette?; Kidnapped from home 24 years ago, no sign
    May 17, 2010 at 9:06am
    By Joseph J. Kolb
    The Gallup Herald

    GALLUP — Most nine-year-olds enjoy a life of play, the love of parents, and safety in their own home. In 1986 Anthonette Cayedito had none of these and now her life has been relegated to a large cardboard box numbered 00006-86 filled with photos, interview documents, and dead-end clues on a remote shelf at Gallup Police Headquarters.

    Sometime between the hours of 3 a.m.-7 a.m. on April 7, 1986, Anthonette was kidnapped from her home at 204 Arnold Street, Apartment #9, by two men who dragged her to a brown van parked in front of the house.

    “We haven’t had anything on this case for almost 10 years since the mother died,” said Deputy Chief of Police John Allen. “We’ve had several detectives look at this case over the years but haven’t been able to come up with anything new.”

    On the darker side of Anthonette’s life, she and her two sisters were frequently left alone with a babysitter by their mother Penny, who often frequented the bars along Highway 66. She had been out at the Talk of the Town Bar until after midnight the night her daughter was abducted.

    There was also speculation that both Penny and Anthonette’s biological father, Larry Estrada, were involved with drugs.

    “A neighbor said it wasn’t unusual for Penny to have people visit all hours of the night,” said Allen as he reviewed the yellowing reports.

    During the early stages of the investigation, according to Allen, there was a group of suspects that included two known sex offenders, but none panned out as credible suspects.

    Around midnight of the kidnapping, Penny returned home after leaving her three young daughters with a babysitter. She told investigators that she allowed the children to stay up and play until 3 a.m. Penny said Anthonette slept in her bed with her but wasn’t there when she went to wake the girls at 7 a.m. for Bible School. She never reported hearing the knock on the door that her daughter answered. It wasn’t until she woke up at 7 a.m., did Penny notice Anthonette missing.

    She initially thought Anthonette had gone looking for a neighbor’s dog that had been missing.

    After calling her repeatedly panic set in. She and the neighbors began scouring the nearby hills and around the housing complex to no avail.

    The case went cold, despite a three day search, from the beginning.

    A week after her daughter went missing Penny turned to a Navajo Medicine Woman who performed the Crystal Ceremony where she contacted the spirit of a missing person. She told Penny that Anthonette may be alive and have a child but is being threatened if she leaves. There was the startling revelation that Anthonette was taken by someone she knew.

    The circumstances of the kidnapping didn’t actually surface until four years later when Cayedito’s younger sister, Wendy, who was five-years-old at the time, told Gallup Police Department Detective Marty Esquibel and FBI agent Kevin Miles that her sister answered a knock at the door by a man identifying herself as “Uncle Joe.” Wendy told Esquibel and Miles that she didn’t say anything because of how upset her mother, Penny, was. The “Uncle Joe” lead proved to be a dead-end.

    Years after he left the police department Esquibel said he had his suspicions about what had happened.

    “I’m pretty confident Penny had knowledge of who took Anthonette based on her failing a polygraph test administered by the FBI,” said Esquibel recently which coincides with the medicine woman’s spiritual hypothesis.

    Despite the failed polygraph the District Attorney’s office never pursued any charges against Penny.


    A significant break came seven months later when the Gallup Police dispatch received a call from a girl identifying herself as Anthonette as being in Albuquerque. After a brief exchange with the dispatcher a voice could be heard in the background then the girl screamed. Esquibel and Miles brought the tape to Penny who confirmed it was his daughter.

    “I listened to that tape over and over and just got chills,” said Penny during a 1992 episode of the television show Unsolved Mysteries which profiled the case.

    Just as abruptly as hope emerged, it disappeared for four years.

    At a diner in Carson City, Nev., a young girl, around the age Anthonette would have been at the time, was eating with an unkempt man and woman. She repeatedly attempted to get the waitress’s attention. When the trio left and the waitress was cleaning the table she found a note pleading her for help and to call the police. By the time she found the note the trio was long gone.

    Over the years there have been sporadic reports of someone fitting the description of Anthonette being seen from Canada to New York, to Texas.

    There was little to no tangible evidence left at the scene. There were no DNA samples taken because the technology did not exist at the time. Samples were later taken from family members when technology caught up with the case but it was of no help.

    While the case became a dark memory for Gallup and her classmates from Lincoln Elementary
    School moved or started families of their own, the FBI went to question Penny on her deathbed in Tucson, Ariz., but arrived too late. She had died.

    According to Special Agent Steve Marshall, spokesman, FBI’s Albuquerque Field Office, the case was closed in June 2006, after endless leads led to more endless leads.


    “This case was very weird,” said Marshall who would not speculate on suspects or what happened to Anthonette.

    The Gallup Police still consider the case open but as the years pass the white cardboard box is beginning to take on a beige appearance of age.

    “I don’t know but at this point the statistics of such cases would lead us to believe she is dead,” said Allen. “But we just don’t know.”

    Esquibel said Anthonette’s chances may have been better had their been the Amber Alert System in place.

    “Back then we had to wait 24 hours before considering a child missing,” he said.
    Anyone with information regarding the disappearance of Anthonette Cayedito, who would now be 34-years-old, should call the Gallup Police Department at 505-863-9365.
     
    KareBear, Mel70, Whatsnext and 4 others like this.
  6. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
    Anthonette age progressed a few years after her disappearance.

    [​IMG]
    Anthonette Cayedito age-progression to at age 28.

    [​IMG]
    Age progressed to 30 years (9/26/2007)

    [​IMG]

    Anthonette's photo is shown age-progressed to 36 years. Circa 2013:
     
    KareBear, Whatsnext, spike and 3 others like this.
  7. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Anthonette was last seen inside her family's residence in the 200 block of Arnold Street off Route 66 in Gallup, New Mexico on April 6, 1986.

    Her sister told authorities that Anthonette opened the front door after an unidentified male claiming to be ''Uncle Joe'' knocked at approximately 3:00 a.m. As Anthonette opened the door, she was forced into a waiting brown van. Uncle Joe, has been cleared as a suspect as he had an alibi.
     
    KareBear, Whatsnext, spike and 3 others like this.
  8. MadgeS

    MadgeS Bronze Member

    Very interesting case, also heartbreaking that the child was kidnapped in the middle of the night, snatched from her family.
    praying she's found.
     
    KareBear, Whatsnext, spike and 2 others like this.
  9. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    Holding out hope for girl who vanished 30 years ago
    By Joline Gutierrez Krueger / Journal

    [​IMG]

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — She was 9, but already she had assumed much of the responsibilities of caring for her two younger sisters.

    “The story I always heard was that Anthonette was like our mommy,” recalls Wendy Montoya, the youngest sister. “She made sure all our clothes were ironed for the week, made sure we were fed and the house was clean. When our mom went out, we usually had adult supervision, but a majority of times it was my sister helping the baby sitter take care of us.”

    So perhaps it was not surprising that when the knock on the door came in the middle of the night to the family’s apartment just off Route 66 in Gallup it was Anthonette Christine Cayedito who answered it.

    That was the last time Montoya and her family saw her.

    That was 30 years ago today.

    “I remember the police asking me what happened, and I had thought then that it was one of our uncles at the door. That turned out not to be true,” she says. “Really, I’m not sure what happened to her.”

    That’s understandable. Montoya was 5 when her sister disappeared.

    As the story goes, mother Penny Cayedito had gone out and arrived home to the family’s apartment at 204 Arnold St. around midnight April 6, 1986. She sent the baby sitter home and went to bed before 3 a.m. Sometime in those early hours came the knock on the door, but she slept through it. She didn’t notice Anthonette was missing until around 7 a.m. when she woke up the girls for Bible school.

    Despite an intensive search, relatives, neighbors and Gallup police could find no trace of Anthonette.

    Where is she?Anthonette Christine Cayedito was born Christmas Day 1976 and disappeared April 6, 1986, from the family apartment at 204 Arnold St. in Gallup. She is of Navajo and Caucasian descent with brown hair and eyes, a birthmark on her upper right cheek near the bridge of her nose, a scar on her knee and a scar on her lip. She would be 39. Contact the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800-843-5678 or www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/600709 or call Gallup police via Crime Stoppers at 1-877-722-6161.
    A year after she disappeared, Gallup police reported receiving a phone call from someone with a young voice claiming to be Anthonette and saying she was in Albuquerque. Before the call could be traced, the voice of an angry man was heard shouting, “Who said you could use the phone?” Then came the sound of a scuffle, a scream, nothing.

    Four years later, a waitress in Carson City, Nev., about 870 miles northwest of Gallup, reported seeing a girl in her early teens seated with a couple she described as “unkempt.” The girl, the waitress told investigators, repeatedly dropped her fork. Each time the waitress retrieved the fork, the girl squeezed her hand. Later, after the threesome left, the waitress found a note scrawled on a napkin hidden under the girl’s plate. “Help me! Call police,” it said.

    Nothing came of the waitress’ story.

    Over the years, other efforts have been made to find Anthonette. In 1992, the TV show “Unsolved Mysteries” re-enacted her disappearance.

    Penny Cayedito looked to her Navajo culture and consulted medicine men and women about her missing daughter.

    The case remains open, a box of files kept in the office of Gallup police Lt. Rosanne Morrisette.

    “We have several cold cases, but this is a child,” she says. “Every time a new detective comes on, they go through the case to see what we might have missed. Unfortunately, there have been no leads, no tips that have led anywhere.”

    No answers and no Anthonette devastated Montoya’s family – and Montoya.

    “It just broke my whole family up,” she tells me in a phone call from Bakersfield, Calif., where she lives with her own family. “It was a very dark and dysfunctional time.”

    Montoya says she and her mother could barely speak of Anthonette without crying, and then without drinking and getting high.

    “That was how we coped with the pain, to numb it, not to forget about it but to put it on the shelf, you know?” she says.

    News accounts say that investigators believe Penny Cayedito knew more about her daughter’s disappearance than she had revealed and that she had failed a lie-detector test. She died April 18, 1999, two weeks and 13 years after Anthonette’s disappearance, whatever secrets she might have held dying with her.

    Montoya became estranged from her middle sister. She fell deeper into drugs, alcohol and gangs and was in and out of the criminal justice system. She lost custody of her children.

    She thinks the loss of her sister contributed to her tumble into that hopeless abyss.

    About nine years ago, Montoya says she decided she needed to crawl back from the bottom. If she could not find her sister, she says, she could at least find herself.

    “I went into rehab,” she says. “I struggled to get my kids back, struggled to get away from the old person I was, to break the cycle I was raised up in, and to get far away from here. And I did it.”

    Still, the loss of her sister haunts her. She sees her face in every crowd – except she is not even sure what that face looks like now. For her, Anthonette is forever frozen at age 9, a little girl with a jumble of teeth, soft brown eyes and a caregiver’s heart. She is the one they called Squirrel, the one who loved the color purple and Ronnie Milsap, the one who took care of her like a mother when their mother could not.

    At least, this is what Montoya believes is true.

    “I really don’t want to lie and say I remember everything about her. I don’t,” Montoya says. “I just go off the picture and off the stories I was told as the years go by. I really don’t know her. It hurts me. Thirty years is a long time not to know who your sister was.”

    She hopes that Anthonette is still out there and that there is still time to find out.
     
    KareBear, Whatsnext, spike and 3 others like this.
  10. Kimster

    Kimster Director Staff Member

    What an intriguing case! She could very well be out there somewhere.
     
  11. DaisyChains

    DaisyChains Bronze Member

    Whatsnext, Akoya and spike like this.
  12. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/cold...s-ago-anthonette-cayedito-disappeared-n743951
    31 Years Ago, Anthonette Cayedito Disappeared

    Someone knocked on the Cayedito's apartment door in the middle of the night. Nine-year-old Anthonette Cayedito went to answer it. Who the visitor was is unclear, but authorities believe the visitor took Anthonette that night. And more than 31 years later, Anthonette remains missing.

    Anthonette's case remains open, the files kept in a box at the Gallup Police Department. A spokesperson for the department told Dateline there have not been very many tips in recent years. But every time a new detective joins the team, the case gets a fresh set of eyes to look at it. Anthonette's mother Penny passed away in 1999, without any answers to what may have happened to her oldest daughter. Anyone with information regarding Anthonette's case is urged to call the Gallup Police Department at (505) 863-9365.
     
  13. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

  14. Scorpio

    Scorpio Bronze Member

    upload_2017-5-25_14-13-30.gif
    Remarks:
    Cayedito is of Navajo and Italian descent. At the time of her disappearance, she wore glasses. She was known to wear a silver chain with a small turquoise cross pendant.

    Details:
    Anthonette Cayedito was last seen inside her family’s residence in Gallup, New Mexico, on April 6, 1986. She was last seen wearing a pink nightgown.

    Submit a Tip:
    If you have any information concerning this person, please contact your local FBI office or the nearest American Embassy or Consulate.

    Field Office: Albuquerque
     
  15. SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed Administrator Staff Member

  16. Kimster

    Kimster Director Staff Member

  17. SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed Administrator Staff Member

    Definitely similar Kimster! What are the age differences of the age-progression and the Doe's reconstruction? The picture on the left looks younger. A little different face shape, but that could be from aging or just artistic impressions. Close enough to submit, if other details match up IMO.
     
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  18. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Submit the comparison, Kimster. I think it looks good.
     
    DaisyChains, Jay and Scorpio like this.
  19. Kimster

    Kimster Director Staff Member

    I forgot I was looking at this case last summer. Things got away from me! The UID and Anthonette's DNA both have been submitted, so I don't know that this will work out, but I'm going to submit just in case an error was made somewhere along the line.

    Here's the NamUS link: https://www.findthemissing.org/en/cases/4401/6
     
  20. Mel70

    Mel70 Bronze Member

    YOU DON'T "CLOSE" A CASE UNLESS IT'S SOLVED. COLD CASE, YES. WTF?!:mad:
     

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