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PA DAWN MOZINO: Missing from Wayne, PA - 22 May 1989 - Age 23

Discussion in 'Missing 1980 to 1989' started by Akoya, Aug 16, 2016.

  1. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 16, 2016
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  2. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.findthemissing.org/en/cases/2911

    NamUs MP # 2911
    Dawn Mozino
    [​IMG]
    Delaware County, Pennsylvania
    23 year old white female

    Case Report - NamUs MP # 2911

    Case Information
    Status Missing
    First name Dawn
    Middle name Marie
    Last name Mozino
    Nickname/Alias
    Date last seen May 22, 1989 00:00
    Date entered 10/08/2009
    Age last seen 23 to years old
    Age now 51 years old
    Race White
    Ethnicity
    Sex Female
    Height (inches) 58.0 to 60.0
    Weight (pounds) 110.0 to 120.0

    Circumstances
    City Wayne
    State Pennsylvania
    Zip code
    County Delaware
    Circumstances
    Dawn Mozino was last seen where she was employed at the Bryn Mawr Hospital. She was supposed to take public transportation to the area where she resides, however she never arrived.

    Physical
    Hair color Brown
    Head hair
    Very curly brown hair
    Body hair

    Facial hair

    Left eye color Brown
    Right eye color Brown

    Clothing
    Last seen wearing a gray skirt, maroon vest, white shirt and black tie.

    Dental
    Status: Dental information / charting is available and entered

    DNA
    Status: Sample submitted - Tests complete

    Fingerprint Information
    Status: Fingerprint information is currently not available

    Investigating Agency
    Title Det.
    First name Jim
    Last name Santoliquito
    Phone 610-688-0503
    Website
    Case number 89-04646
    Date reported
    Jurisdiction Local
    Agency Radnor Township Police Department
    Address 1 301 Iven Avenue
    Address 2
    City Wayne
    State Pennsylvania
    Zip code 19087

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://missingdawnmozino.wordpress.com/2012/05/

    [​IMG]

    Twenty years later the Mozino family is still looking for answers

    Posted: May 4, 2012 | Author: missingdawnmozino | Filed under: News Articles | Leave a comment

    Published: Friday, May 15, 2009

    By Caroline Goldstein

    Twenty years does not make the pain any easier for the family of Dawn Mozino, the 23-year-old Wayne woman who disappeared on May 22, 1989.

    Mozino, who had a learning disability, had left work at Bryn Mawr Hospital to wait at a bus stop in Bryn Mawr. Police believe that it was there that Thomas W. Hawkins Jr., on death row for murdering his niece and convicted of murdering another woman named Karen Stubbs, abducted Mozino.

    Mozino and Hawkins had worked together at Paoli Nursing and Rehabilitation. Mozino left Paoli to work as a dietary aide at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Investigators believe Hawkins wanted a job at Bryn Mawr and wanted Mozino’s help in getting it.

    She would have been 44 years old on June 19.

    Mozino’s sister, Cathy Mozino-Miesen, remembers what it felt like when her sister went missing. “It was like a twilight moment for me,” Mozino-Miesen said. “We couldn’t believe that she didn’t come home.”

    Mozino-Miesen recalled listening to her sister’s answering-machine messages shortly after Dawn had not come home. “There must have been 15 messages from her boyfriend,” all wondering where Dawn was.

    “I can remember walking train tracks trying to find something that belonged to her.”

    “It really broke my mom,” Mozino-Miesen said. “I think my dad went into sort of turbo mode in a mission to figure out what happened and to get her back. To this day they are still like that.”

    “Looking at it from a parent’s perspective now, for both of them and my stepmother, it’s a lump in the stomach every time we talk about it, even now.”

    And to this day, whenever the Mozino family sees on the news that a body or skeletal remains have been found, they contact the police to find out if it could be Dawn.

    The police’s attention to the case even 20 years later is something Mozino-Miesen is grateful for. She said that recently her dad, Andrew, had to contact the Radnor Police Department for something unrelated to her sister’s case. The dispatcher who answered the phone said “I was just thinking about you.”

    “The fact that it is still active in their mind is comforting in a way. It gives us hope.”

    The family feels much the same way about former Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce Castor, who Mozino-Miesen said “will always take a phone call from our family and will always look into it.”

    With the 20th anniversary of Dawn’s disappearance this month, the Mozinos want to keep her memory alive. “While she’s not here, she’s still an active part of our family,” Mozino-Miesen said.

    She remembers Dawn as “very athletic, always smiling, very trusting, happy, extremely proud of her accomplishments. She knew that things were not as easy for her as they were for most and she never let that stop her.”

    The two sisters had the “typical sister relationship.” Mozino-Miesen said she remembers “being really young and driving Big Wheels through the mud and laughing” with her sister.

    Dawn was “high functioning” despite her learning disability. She held a job, had her own bank account and had a boyfriend.

    Dawn was active in the Special Olympics and won numerous medals, including two gold medals, one of which her sister keeps and the other her mom, Diane, has.

    Mozino-Miesen recalled a recurring dream that she has about her sister. “I’m driving down South Devon [Avenue] and she’s walking up South Devon. We see each other and I stop the car and then the dream is over. I never have a dream about her doing anything else.”

    Mozino’s disappearance certainly changed her family. “We always know where everybody is,” Mozino-Miesen said.

    This is especially true for her now as a mother. “In the beginning I was an extremely paranoid mother. I try not to make my children as paranoid as I am. I don’t want to make them afraid, but I want to teach them to be safe.”

    Mozino-Miesen often thinks about closure but “I don’t even know that giving us an answer will give us closure.” Knowing what happened to Dawn still will not answer why.

    Even with the anniversary coming, Mozino-Miesen said “we just march on — otherwise if you don’t it will ruin you — and I think that’s what Dawn would want.”

    “Not that it gets any easier but you learn how to cope and you keep going.”

    Mozino-Miesen wants to make sure people realize “it really can happen anywhere and can happen to anyone.”

    But most importantly, “I just wanted some sort of tribute to her, to let people know that it’s still an unanswered case.”

    “I don’t want people to forget her.”

    http://www.mainlinemedianews.com/ar...4a0a070c7779d328458320.txt?viewmode=fullstory
     
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  4. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://missingdawnmozino.wordpress.com/2012/05/

    Missing 7 Years, Mourned Dawn Marie Mozino Vanished In 1989. A Memorial Mass Is Set

    Posted: May 4, 2012 | Author: missingdawnmozino | Filed under: News Articles | Leave a comment

    May 21, 1996|By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
    RADNOR — Sometimes, Diane Mozino sits in her living room and almost hears her daughter walking through the front door. She has this fantasy even though it’s been seven years since Dawn Marie, then 23, disappeared without a trace.

    On May 22, 1989, her daughter did not come home after working at Bryn Mawr Hospital.

    Dawn Marie is remembered as a friendly and sweet young woman who had learning disabilities. Her family and police believe she was murdered. This anniversary of her disappearance means that she is presumed dead.

    Tomorrow, a memorial Mass will begin at 6:15 p.m. when the family will receive friends in the sanctuary of St. Thomas of Villanova Church on the campus of Villanova University. The community is invited to attend.

    The Mass does not signify closure, said Mozino: “It’s a way for all of us, the family and the community, to remember and honor Dawn for who she was.”

    Sitting at a table on the patio of her townhouse in Devon, Diane Mozino smiled a little and sipped iced tea.

    As she talked, she went through a box of snapshots: a baby pushing up to stand on her mother’s lap; a little girl with a big grin and big glasses; a teenager in a frilly pink prom dress; a young woman standing alongside “Pop-Pop,” her beloved grandfather.

    “I’ll hear her come in the front door and say, `Hi, Mom, I’m home,’ ” the mother said. “I know that won’t happen, but it gives me peace to think about it.”

    Dawn Mozino was on her way to a practice session for Special Olympics at the Berwyn YMCA. She was a gold medal winner in soccer and running.

    Around 3 p.m. that Monday afternoon, she was waiting for a bus down the street from Bryn Mawr Hospital, where she worked as a hostess in the nutrition department.

    The Mozino family – Diane, her ex-husband, Andrew, and her other daughter, Cathy, 26 – have lived with questions since then. Dawn would never have run away, they say. She always kept in touch with her family, and maintained a daily routine that she seldom altered.

    “If she went across the street, she would call and tell me she got there OK,” her mother said.

    For months, posters were everywhere on the Main Line and through the region down into Maryland, offering a $5,000 reward for information. The poster and photo of the young woman with shoulder-length curly brown hair was seen by thousands.

    Luther “Lucky” Leighton, deputy superintendent of the Radnor Police Department, says the case remains open. He has been on it since the beginning. He will be one of the readers at the Mass tomorrow evening.

    For years, the prime suspect has been Thomas Hawkins, 32, a former co-worker with Dawn at the Main Line Rehabilitation & Nursing Center in Paoli, who had been identified as being with Dawn at the bus stop.

    Hawkins, 32, is now on death row in Pennsylvania for the murder of his niece, Andrea Thomas, 14, who was killed about two weeks after Dawn disappeared. He was already on parole after serving six years in prison for the 1980 strangulation of Karen Stubbs, 15, of Reading.

    If Hawkins has information about the crime, he will never tell, Leighton said. Hawkins has never confessed to killing anyone, and his death sentence is under appeal.

    Diane Mozino spends her days working at the Villanova law library. She also baby-sits for children in the neighborhood.

    She says she is ambivalent about Hawkins’ potential execution. If he lives, she says, he might be able to tell her what happened to her daughter. “If he’s executed, at least he’ll have a grave and a marker. We don’t even have that for Dawn.”

    Andrew Mozino, Dawn’s father, who lives in Rosemont, praised the Radnor police and the Montgomery County prosecutors. “Every week or so Lucky calls just to see how we’re all doing,” he said.

    He’s my right arm,” Diane Mozino said of Leighton. “The smallest lead or any bit of information we want checked out is done immediately.”

    One night, a couple of years ago, Diane and Cathy Mozino were awakened by Leighton for a trip to Philadelphia to identify a homeless woman who had been picked up.

    “It was so scary,” said Mozino. “We didn’t know who or what was going to come through the door. It wasn’t her, but there were some similarities.”

    The Mozino family has weathered hundreds of disappointments over the years – phone calls and tips that went nowhere. For more than a month after Dawn disappeared, Diane Mozino would not leave the house.

    “I kept thinking I’d miss her, or the phone would ring,” Mozino said.

    Finally, a friend talked her into going to the farmer’s market in Wayne. “I got there and walked around and started to cry and had to go home,” she said.”

    For Dawn’s sister, Cathy, it’s been a struggle, too: “I don’t remember too much about those early days. I don’t know if that’s by choice or what. I like to remember the times we went roller-skating and rode our Big Wheels around the neighborhood.”

    Diane Mozino moved across the road from the home she shared with Dawn. “I couldn’t stay there because I kept hearing her footsteps,” she said.
     
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  5. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://missingdawnmozino.wordpress.com/2012/05/

    5 Years Go By, And She Is Still Missing Dawn Mozino’s Father Is Offering $15,000 For Clues. A Man Tried In A Slaying Is A Suspect.

    Posted: May 4, 2012 | Author: missingdawnmozino | Filed under: News Articles | Leave a comment

    August 18, 1994|By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
    Montgomery County prosecutors yesterday presented their key evidence – saliva, fingerprints and clothing fibers – in the murder retrial of Thomas W. Hawkins Jr., who is accused of killing his 14-year-old niece.

    The trial, in Montgomery County Court in Norristown, is the second for Hawkins in connection with the June 4, 1989, killing of Andrea Thomas, whose nude body was found in her West Pottsgrove Township home.

    In 1990, a jury convicted Hawkins, 30, of the 200 block of South Cecil Street, Philadelphia, of murder and rape and sentenced him to death.



    But that decision was overturned by the state Supreme Court because the jury was given extensive information about another murder, to which Hawkins had pleaded guilty 10 years earlier. He is charged in the retrial with murder and indecent assault.

    The new trial began Monday, but First Assistant District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. saved most of his scientific experts for yesterday.

    One of them, FBI Agent Richard Reem, testified that he conducted tests on traces of saliva found on Thomas’ body and determined that they were consistent with Hawkins’ rare blood type.

    But during cross-examination, defense attorney Michael G. Floyd argued that

    because FBI investigators did not conduct DNA tests on the saliva, they could not say conclusively that Hawkins was the only person who could have killed Thomas.

    Earlier in the day, FBI agents testified that clothing fibers consistent with a pair of black slacks that Hawkins wore on the day of the murder were found on a dress that the victim had been wearing, and that two of his fingerprints were found on a trash bag in the house.

    On Tuesday, Michael Murphy, a former prison cellmate of Hawkins’, testified that Hawkins confessed to the killing to him and another prisoner in 1990.

    Throughout the trial, Floyd has suggested that a burglar could have killed and raped Thomas.

    He is expected to introduce DNA test results of his own he says will show that Hawkins could not have committed those crimes. The prosecution plans to rebut that with testimony from Henry C. Lee, a forensic expert who is working on the O.J. Simpson defense team.

    All of what has happened in the trial has been watched with great care from the spectators’ section by William Stubbs of Reading and Diane Mozino of Radnor.

    Stubbs’ daughter, Karen, 15, was killed in 1980 in similar fashion to Thomas. Hawkins pleaded guilty to third-degree murder for that crime and served nearly six years in prison.

    Mozino’s daughter, Dawn, 25, has been missing since May 22, 1989. Though no arrests have been made, the Montgomery County District Attorney’s Office investigated Hawkins in connection with that matter as well.

    Dawn Mozino worked briefly with Hawkins at the Main Line Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Paoli and was last seen with him at a bus stop in Delaware County.
     
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  6. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://missingdawnmozino.wordpress.com/2012/05/

    Reward Offered By Parents Of Missing Woman

    Posted: May 4, 2012 | Author: missingdawnmozino | Filed under: News Articles | Leave a comment

    June 08, 1989|By Rebecca Rubin, Special to The Inquirer



    The parents of Dawn Marie Mozino offered a $5,000 reward Tuesday for information leading to the whereabouts of their 24-year-old daughter, who has been missing since May 22.

    Dawn Mozino, of the 100 block of Eaton Drive, is learning-disabled, police said. She was last seen getting off a SEPTA bus and walking toward the K mart on Lancaster Avenue in Tredyffrin Township, according to police investigators. A 100-pound, 4-foot-10 brunette, Mozino, who is white, got on the bus about 3 p.m. after leaving work at Bryn Mawr Hospital, where she is a hostess in the nutrition department. She was wearing a gray skirt, maroon vest, white shirt and a black bow tie.

    Radnor police Lt. Henry Jansen said that township police and the Delaware County Criminal Investigation Unit had checked out numerous leads but had turned up nothing.

    Anyone with information about Mozino’s disappearance is urged to call the Radnor Township Police Department at 688-0500 or the County Criminal Investigation Unit at 565-8700.
     
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  7. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.delcotimes.com/article/DC/20090524/NEWS/305249993

    20 years later, Dawn Mozino's disappearance remains a mystery

    [​IMG]

    By JOHN M. ROMAN

    Posted: 05/24/09, 12:01 AM EDT | Updated: on 05/24/2009


    [​IMG]

    Cathy Mozino Miesen, right, with her mother, Diane Mozino, holds a photo of Dawn Mozino, at her mother's home in Radnor.
    Dawn Marie Mozino, 23, of Radnor, a learning-disabled woman who enjoyed working at area hospitals and Special Olympics, disappeared without a trace after work one afternoon 20 years ago.

    <snip>

    Despite a dogged investigation, detectives in Montgomery and Delaware counties have been unable to get a prime suspect -- a convicted double-killer on death row -- to provide the key to unlock the mystery of her whereabouts since she vanished May 22, 1989.



    Detectives crisscrossed the region from Bryn Mawr to Berwyn and from Graterford Prison to Philadelphia trying to come up with any answer to Dawn's disappearance.

    Diane Mozino, 66, the mother of the petite young woman who resembled a teenager, has been almost as relentless as detectives in her quest to find the older of her two daughters.

    Mozino sat through two grisly trials of death-row killer Thomas W. Hawkins Jr. of Philadelphia, who once worked with Dawn at Paoli Hospital and asked for her help in getting a job at Bryn Mawr Hospital, Mozino said. Dawn worked as a hostess in the nutrition department of the hospital and wore a uniform.

    Mozino isn't eager to see Hawkins executed for his conviction in 1994 of the murder of his 14-year-old niece in West Pottsgrove, Montgomery County. Not yet, anyway, because she and detectives hope Hawkins won't take a dark secret to his grave.

    <snip>

    Hawkins is believed by authorities to be the last person seen with the friendly, trusting woman who had a minimal brain dysfunction.

    A hospital employee who had stopped at a traffic light positively identified Hawkins from a photo array as a person seen with Dawn at the bus stop at Lancaster and Bryn Mawr avenues in Lower Merion, Montgomery County, that tragic afternoon, police said. Dawn had left work at 3:30 p.m. and was wearing her uniform.

    <snip>

    Hawkins murdered his niece two years after he was released on parole for the 1980 murder of Karen Stubbs, 15, of Reading, who was found strangled and stabbed in the throat in a locked dormitory room in the same apartment building where his parents lived in the basement. He pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in Berks County and served six years in prison.


    Anyone with information is urged to call Radnor Police Sgts. Andy Block or Joe Maguire at 610-688-0500, the Delaware County Criminal Investigation Division at 610-891-4700, or Montgomery County CID at 610-278-3339.
     
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  8. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://articles.philly.com/2009-06-09/news/25284657_1_special-olympics-medals-dream-job

    20 years of waiting for Dawn A haunting mystery, a prime suspect, and a well of grief.

    By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
    POSTED: June 09, 2009

    With a dream job at Bryn Mawr Hospital, hopes of a wedding, and a slew of gold medals from the Special Olympics, Dawn Mozino could not have been happier.

    Born with a learning disability, Dawn was proving at age 23 that she could take care of herself. At just 4-foot-10 and 100 pounds, she was a scrappy athlete who loved competing in track. And she and her boyfriend were happily planning a future together.

    "She loved her job. She had her own bank account, her own phone. Dawn was in a place where, if she said she wanted to move out into her own apartment, she was ready," said her mother, Diane Mozino, who lived with her two daughters in Wayne.

    Dawn never got a chance to show the world how independent she had become.

    On May 22, 1989, the upbeat young woman left work at 3:30 p.m. as usual, eager to get to track practice at the Upper Main Line YMCA. She walked two blocks to Lancaster and Bryn Mawr Avenues to catch the bus.

    And then she disappeared.



    <snip>


    At the same time, Dawn was racking up medals as a long-distance runner in the Special Olympics. Twice a year she would compete at events at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.

    "She had so many medals. That was her pride and joy," recalled her father, Andrew Mozino, a retired real estate consultant who is divorced from Dawn's mother and lives in Bryn Mawr.

    Her difficulties with memory and attention didn't stop her from reading and writing poetry and memorizing the local bus and train schedules.

    "If you were having a conversation with her, you wouldn't know she had a learning disability," said her father.

    It was through Special Olympics that Dawn met Dan Kolb, who also had developmental problems. After dating for about four years, they were inching toward living together and even attended marriage counseling at United Methodist Church in Wayne, said her mother.

    <snip>
     
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  9. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://articles.philly.com/2009-06-09/news/25284657_1_special-olympics-medals-dream-job

    20 years of waiting for Dawn A haunting mystery, a prime suspect, and a well of grief.

    By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
    POSTED: June 09, 2009

    With a dream job at Bryn Mawr Hospital, hopes of a wedding, and a slew of gold medals from the Special Olympics, Dawn Mozino could not have been happier.

    Born with a learning disability, Dawn was proving at age 23 that she could take care of herself. At just 4-foot-10 and 100 pounds, she was a scrappy athlete who loved competing in track. And she and her boyfriend were happily planning a future together.

    "She loved her job. She had her own bank account, her own phone. Dawn was in a place where, if she said she wanted to move out into her own apartment, she was ready," said her mother, Diane Mozino, who lived with her two daughters in Wayne.

    Dawn never got a chance to show the world how independent she had become.

    On May 22, 1989, the upbeat young woman left work at 3:30 p.m. as usual, eager to get to track practice at the Upper Main Line YMCA. She walked two blocks to Lancaster and Bryn Mawr Avenues to catch the bus.

    And then she disappeared.



    <snip>


    At the same time, Dawn was racking up medals as a long-distance runner in the Special Olympics. Twice a year she would compete at events at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.

    "She had so many medals. That was her pride and joy," recalled her father, Andrew Mozino, a retired real estate consultant who is divorced from Dawn's mother and lives in Bryn Mawr.

    Her difficulties with memory and attention didn't stop her from reading and writing poetry and memorizing the local bus and train schedules.

    "If you were having a conversation with her, you wouldn't know she had a learning disability," said her father.

    It was through Special Olympics that Dawn met Dan Kolb, who also had developmental problems. After dating for about four years, they were inching toward living together and even attended marriage counseling at United Methodist Church in Wayne, said her mother.

    <snip>
     
  10. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  11. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    On May 22, 1989, the upbeat young woman left work at 3:30 p.m. as usual, eager to get to track practice at the Upper Main Line YMCA. She walked two blocks to Lancaster and Bryn Mawr Avenues to catch the bus. A 100-pound, 4-foot-10 brunette, Mozino, who is white, got on the bus about 3 p.m. after leaving work at Bryn Mawr Hospital, where she is a hostess in the nutrition department. She was wearing a gray skirt, maroon vest, white shirt and a black bow tie.


    Bryn Mawr Hospital

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    A hospital employee who had stopped at a traffic light positively identified Hawkins from a photo array as a person seen with Dawn at the bus stop at Lancaster and Bryn Mawr avenues in Lower Merion, Montgomery County, that tragic afternoon, police said. Dawn had left work at 3:30 p.m. and was wearing her uniform.

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    On May 22, 1989, the upbeat young woman left work at 3:30 p.m. as usual, eager to get to track practice at the Upper Main Line YMCA. She walked two blocks to Lancaster and Bryn Mawr Avenues to catch the bus.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    At the same time, Dawn was racking up medals as a long-distance runner in the Special Olympics. Twice a year she would compete at events at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.

    [​IMG]

    philadelphia.cbslocal.com

    Villanova Hosts World's Largest Student-Run Special Olympics Event

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Dawn Mozino, of the 100 block of Eaton Drive, is learning-disabled, police said. She was last seen getting off a SEPTA bus and walking toward the K mart on Lancaster Avenue in Tredyffrin Township, according to police investigators. A 100-pound, 4-foot-10 brunette, Mozino, who is white, got on the bus about 3 p.m. after leaving work at Bryn Mawr Hospital, where she is a hostess in the nutrition department. She was wearing a gray skirt, maroon vest, white shirt and a black bow tie.

    Kmart in Tredyffrin
    704 W Lancaster Ave,
    Wayne, PA

    Kmart at 704 West Lancaster

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Mozino and Hawkins had worked together at Paoli Nursing and Rehabilitation. Mozino left Paoli to work as a dietary aide at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Investigators believe Hawkins wanted a job at Bryn Mawr and wanted Mozino’s help in getting it. Hawkins is now on death row in Pennsylvania for the murder of his niece, Andrea Thomas, 14, who was killed about two weeks after Dawn disappeared. He was already on parole after serving six years in prison for the 1980 strangulation of Karen Stubbs, 15, of Reading. If Hawkins has information about the crime, he will never tell, Leighton said. Hawkins has never confessed to killing anyone, and his death sentence is under appeal. Hawkins is from the 200 block of South Cecil Street in Philadelphia.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://murderpedia.org/male.H/h/hawkins-thomas-william.htm

    Thomas William HAWKINS Jr.



    Classification: Homicide / Murderer
    Characteristics: Juvenile(16) - Rape
    Number of victims: 2
    Date of murders: 1980 / 1989
    Date of birth: December 31, 1963
    Victims profile: Karen Stubbs, 15 / Andrea Thomas, 14 (his niece)
    Method of murder: Strangulation / Stabbing with a fork
    Location: Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA
    Status: Pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in 1981 and served five years of a six- to 15-year sentence before being paroled in 1986. Sentenced to death in 1991


    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania


    opinion J-99-2006



    Thomas W. Hawkins Jr., 30, was sentenced to die after a 1990 trial for murdering his 14-year-old niece, Andrea Thomas, in June 1989. Prosecutor Castor alleged Thomas was sexually assaulted, strangled with a cord and stabbed in the neck and back with a fork inside her grandparents’ home on Old Reading Pike in West Pottsgrove.

    After the state Supreme Court overturned the conviction on a technicality, Hawkins was retried in August 1994 and Castor once again won a conviction and death sentence for Hawkins. Castor called Hawkins “an evil serial killer,” pointing out that in 1981, Hawkins was convicted in Berks of third-degree murder and served a 6- to 15-year sentence in connection with the strangulation death of Karen Stubbs, 15, of Reading.


    Former DA Castor recalls ‘evil’ two-time killer

    By Carl Hessler Jr. - The Times Herald

    Saturday, May 30, 2009

    COURTHOUSE — Former prosecutor Bruce L. Castor Jr. saw true “evil” when he faced twice-convicted killer Thomas W. Hawkins Jr. in court.

    “He is the most calculating, evil criminal that I have encountered in 23 years in law enforcement,” said Castor, who worked as a Montgomery County prosecutor from 1985 to 2008. “I would characterize Hawkins as the most evil man I ever encountered in all that time, including some really notorious and heinous killers in the county’s history.”

    District attorney from 1999 to 2008, Castor prosecuted and won death sentences against Hawkins two times for the 1989 West Pottsgrove murder of 14-year-old Andrea Thomas, who was Hawkins’ niece.

    Castor, of Lower Salford, also tried to link Hawkins to the May 22, 1989, disappearance of Dawn Marie Mozino, a 23-year-old learning disabled Radnor woman with whom Hawkins once worked. In 1994, Castor tried to use the death penalty as leverage to get Hawkins to give up information about Mozino’s disappearance.

    “And he has steadfastly refused to do so,” Castor, now a county commissioner, said recently as he reflected on Hawkins and the 20-year anniversary of Mozino’s disappearance.

    “Over time, I became convinced that Hawkins was responsible for her disappearance and probably her murder, and I wanted to be able to bring some peace of mind to the Mozino family and I’m disappointed I was unable to,” Castor said. “The most disappointing aspect of the Hawkins series of investigations and prosecutions is that we did not bring in the disappearance of Dawn Mozino.”

    Even though he’s no longer a prosecutor, nothing nags at Castor more than unsolved cases. He will never forget Mozino’s disappearance and the link he tried to make to the “evil” man he came to know so well.

    “Even with all the successes, the ones you remember are the ones that you failed and this is one of them. Every time I hear Dawn Mozino’s name, my mind immediately flashes to a photograph of her wearing her Special Olympics medals, with her curly hair, smiling, that was in all the papers,” Castor recalled.

    “It’s one of those cases that if they ever did get a lead, if they could ever find her body and tie it to Hawkins, and if the district attorney wanted me to I would come back and prosecute it myself because I think Hawkins is a very dangerous, evil man and I want the Mozino family to have the peace of mind of knowing what happened to Dawn,” Castor added.

    Hawkins, now 45, has been convicted of two murders in his lifetime.

    In 1981, Hawkins, then 16, pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the 1980 strangulation death of Karen Stubbs, 15, of Reading. Stubbs was murdered in a dormitory of a private school in Douglass (Berks), strangled, sexually assaulted and stabbed in the neck with a paint scraper. Hawkins served five years of a six- to 15-year sentence before being paroled in 1986.

    Thomas was killed three years later.

    Thomas’ body was discovered on June 4, 1989, in a bed on the second floor of the 455 Old Reading Pike home of her grandparents, Elmira and Thomas Hawkins Sr., who are Hawkins’ parents. Detectives said the girl was sexually assaulted, strangled with a cord and stabbed in the neck and back with a fork.

    Hawkins initially was convicted of killing Thomas and sentenced to die after an August 1990 trial. However, the state Supreme Court overturned that conviction on a technicality and ordered a retrial.

    Castor retried Hawkins in 1994, again resulting in a first-degree murder conviction and a death sentence.

    “He’s very intelligent. Hawkins tests as a very intelligent man, would have had the whole world open to him had he decided not to be a criminal,” said Castor.

    “He engaged in a very elaborate killing in Berks and cover-up there. Then, in our case, it was exceedingly methodical the way he covered up his crime, began to try to create alibis for himself and set the crime scene up to look like a burglary,” Castor recalled. “He went to great lengths to cover his tracks in order to be able to engage a second time in a killing of a young girl.”

    Testimony revealed Hawkins was a collector of detective magazines and that he highlighted passages detailing murder techniques.

    Hawkins, who is now on death row at the state prison in Graterford, also was named a suspect in Mozino’s disappearance but has not been charged in connection with the incident. Mozino disappeared about two weeks before Andrea Thomas was found murdered.

    Hawkins once worked with Mozino at Paoli Hospital and had asked for Mozino’s help in getting a job at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Testimony previously revealed Mozino was last seen alive with Hawkins at a bus stop in Lower Merion on the day she disappeared.

    “It is highly improbable that it’s an accident that the last person seen with Dawn was Hawkins, who two weeks later would murder Andrea Thomas,” Castor said.

    During the 1994 trial, Castor offered Hawkins a deal - reveal anything he knew about the Mozino case and avoid the death penalty for Thomas’ killing. Hawkins rejected the offer.

    In 2002, when a governor signed Hawkins’ death warrant, Castor again publicly urged Hawkins to divulge information about Mozino to move himself off death row.

    “When the governor signed the death warrant I thought that was an opportunity. I have long thought that the only time Hawkins will divulge the necessary information is when he’s about to actually get executed,” Castor said.

    Hawkins later won a stay of his execution when he filed notice of his federal appeals.

    SEX: M RACE: B TYPE: T MOTIVE: PC-nonspecific

    MO: Rape-slayer of girlfriend (1980) and other women (1989).

    DISPOSITION: Six to 15 years as juvenile, 1980; condemned, 1990.
     
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  17. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    readingeagle.com

    Courtesy of SCI Graterford | Death row inmates are housed along this corridor at SCI Graterford

    Graterford Prison, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

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    Courtesy of SCI Graterford | A death row cell at SCI Graterford in Montgomery County

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  18. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Dawn was racking up medals as a long-distance runner in the Special Olympics. Twice a year she would compete at events at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University. "She had so many medals. That was her pride and joy," recalled her father, Andrew Mozino. With a dream job at Bryn Mawr Hospital, hopes of a wedding, and a slew of gold medals from the Special Olympics, Dawn Mozino could not have been happier.


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  19. DaisyChains

    DaisyChains Bronze Member

    i feel so bad for what happened to Dawn and that her family has lost her. It is heartbreaking.
     
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  20. Imamazed

    Imamazed Lead Administrator Staff Member

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