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PA ELIZABETH LANDE: Missing from Philadelphia County, PA - 12 Dec 1971 - Age 21

Discussion in 'Missing 1900 to 1979' started by Sunburst, Oct 30, 2015.

  1. Sunburst

    Sunburst Bronze Member

    Namus Link: https://www.findthemissing.org/en/cases/2508/16/

    Not a lot of info- no FP, no DNA, no dentals. No circumstances listed. There are pictures, though.

    Eizabeth's height is listed as 50- 54 inches. I am thinking maybe they meant 5 ft-5 ft. 4 instead.
    Green eyes, strawberry blonde hair. What caught my attention was the height and that Elizabeth is one of many young women with strawberry blonde hair that went missing from the late 1960s, 1970s ,1980s.

    She was wearing bell-bottom jeans, platform shoes, long brown coat with fake fur black trim, and carrying a brown suede pocketbook when last seen.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]



    Just MOO, but I think Elizabeth slightly resembles Rosemary Buck, who was mentioned as a possible match for Jonestown Jane Doe, who was found in Union County in 1973. http://www.crimewatchers.net/forum/...of-union-county-october-1973.2374/#post-51435

    Could Jonestown Jane be Elizabeth rather than Rosemary? [​IMG]
    The picture to the immediate right is Rosemary.

    Edited by Imamazed to add media link - http://www.crimewatchers.net/forum/index.php?media/elizabeth-lande-missing-from-pennsylvania.954/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 31, 2015
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  2. Kimster

    Kimster Director Staff Member

    Let's get her name out there and maybe someone in her family will come in and give us more information.
     
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  3. Kimster

    Kimster Director Staff Member

    On the evening of Saturday, December 11, 1971, with her parents out of town on a week-long cruise, Liz Lande and two of her girlfriends spent the evening talking and watching television. At around midnight, Liz received a phone call from her boyfriend, Bobby Nauss, a member of the Warlocks Motorcycle Club. Nauss asked Liz to spend the weekend with him. Concerned about the late hour and Nauss's reputation, Liz's friends tried to talk her out of going - to no avail. The friends left - they never saw Liz alive again.

    At about 1:50 am, a neighbor who lived across the street from the Lande residence heard a noise outside. When he looked out of his bedroom window, he saw Liz walk out of the front door to her house, to the sidewalk and get into a waiting gold-colored Toronado.

    In the early morning hours of Monday, December 13th, Elizabeth Lande was seen hanging from the rafters in a garage behind the the apartment house of one of Nauss' friends. It was this friend who helped Nauss dispose of Liz's body, allegedly in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey.

    On July 12, 1977, almost six years after Liz disappeared, the same friend - turned witness - attempted to lead Law Enforcement to the location in the Pine Barrens where he said he had helped Nauss bury Liz's body. The location was near Williamstown, NJ, about 16 miles southeast of Philadelphia. The previously heavily wooded area was now occupied by housing subdivisions. The witness tried several times to pinpoint the burial site, and the officers dug up each location, but failed to locate Liz's remains.

    On December 9, 1977 Robert Nauss was convicted for the murder of Elizabeth Lande. Her body has never been found.

    http://pennsylvaniamissing.com/lizlande.html
     
  4. Imamazed

    Imamazed Lead Administrator Staff Member

    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
  5. DaisyChains

    DaisyChains Bronze Member

    Oh goodness... sourced some info on the b****** that was Liz's boyfriend. He was a horrible human being (if he even can be called a human...). This article is from 1990 - long after our sweet Liz vanished.

    http://articles.philly.com/1990-11-01/news/25926290_1_parrot-fugitive-killer-marshals

    For Escaped Killer, The Road Ends Ex-warlock Is Captured In A Mich. Town
    By Henry Goldman, Cynthia Mayer and Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writers
    POSTED: November 01, 1990
    LUNA PIER, Mich. — The bluish tattoo of a long-tailed parrot was the final detail leading to the capture Tuesday night of former Warlocks biker Robert Thomas Nauss Jr., the notorious drug dealer, rapist and killer who escaped from prison seven years ago.

    Michigan State Police and federal marshals closed in on Nauss after an anonymous caller contacted the television program, America's Most Wanted, telling the show's producers that Nauss was hiding in Cadillac, more than six hours from where he was found.

    It was a far cry from his days as a Warlock, roaring down Delaware County roads on his Harley-Davidson. For Nauss, the end came in this town hard by Lake Erie as police and U.S. marshals surrounded his GMC Suburban, Nauss behind the wheel, his wife at his side and their three children in the back seat.

    "Sorry," he said to his family. "This is it."

    His family knew him as Richard Ferrer. That was the name on the driver's license demanded by police - the name he had borrowed from a cellmate at Graterford Prison back in Pennsylvania.

    His wife and three children were taken aside. The docile, solidly built man was handcuffed. Then a state police sergeant pulled down Nauss' plaid shirt to expose the right bicep.

    And there, extending almost from the shoulder to the elbow, was the tattoo of the parrot. Silent and inscrutable, the parrot told an old tale, one that the man concealed from his wife, from the children and the people of this modest town.

    "Some of his tattoos had been altered, but not this one," said Dennis Matulewicz of the U.S. Marshal's Office in Philadelphia. "He had a special fondness for the parrot."

    The parrot told a story of a brutal murder almost 20 years ago, and the dismemberment of a young girl's body.

    It told of motorcycle gangs, drugs and rape, and of a cunning escape from one of Pennsylvania's toughest prisons.

    It said, almost inescapably, that the man who called himself Richard Ferrer, the quiet family man who for two years made a life in this middle- class town of 1,500 people and a police force of only four, was really Robert Thomas Nauss Jr., 38, formerly of Aston, Delaware County, a fugitive killer.

    Nauss was arrested about 7 p.m. Tuesday, based on the tip received Sept. 28 by the television show, which featured his story on several of its episodes.

    Nauss waived extradition proceedings yesterday in Detroit. He was being held last night in a Wayne County, Mich., jail, pending his release to U.S. marshals for a yet-to-be scheduled appearance in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, where he will be arraigned on fugitive charges.

    His wife, Toni Ruark, said last night that she had no idea about Nauss' past.

    She sat on the front steps of their ranch home on Halloween night with her parents and two of their children - Steven, 5, and Nicholas, 4, - both dressed in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle pajamas, handing candy to trick-or-treaters.

    "He's a changed man," she said. "At least from what they tell me. He never beat me. He never beat the kids."

    Ruark said she planned to sell Nauss' boat and trailer. She said she did not plan to come to Pennsylvania for his court proceedings.

    "He told her he was an orphan, divorced and had lived in the state of Delaware," said Deputy U.S. Marshal Janet Doyle, who has been on the case since 1987. "He told her he went to Michigan to try to get his life together."

    The couple met in Dearborn in 1984 and were married that year. Ruark has a third child, 9, from a previous marriage, officials said.

    The case began on Dec. 11, 1971, when Elizabeth Ann Lande, 21, a Philadelphia college student and girlfriend of Nauss', disappeared from her home in the city's Overbrook section. Nauss, whom Lande's father, Frank, long suspected was his daughter's killer, was vice president of the Warlocks motorcycle gang.

    When he was arrested for the killing in July 1977, he was awaiting trial on

    drug, rape and weapons charges. By then, he had moved with his first wife and son to a 40-room mansion with a swimming pool in Wallingford, an affluent Delaware County community. In those days, he drove a Cadillac. He financed the home with drug money, U.S. marshals said yesterday.

    He was convicted of the Lande slaying in December 1977 after witnesses testified that Nauss had shown them Lande's body hanging by a rope in a Folcroft garage. Witnesses said Nauss told them he later cut off her hands and feet, and pulled out her teeth to prevent identification. Police believe he buried her somewhere in the New Jersey Pine Barrens under a covering of lime. Her body never was found.


    Nauss was sentenced to life in prison. But on Nov. 17, 1983, he and another inmate, Hans Vorhauer, of Upper Darby, escaped from Graterford Prison by hiding in a large cabinet that was being transported from the prison furniture shop where the pair had made it.

    Vorhauer, a professional burglar and drug dealer, was recaptured in Philadelphia three years later.

    But Nauss continued to elude his pursuers.

    On Feb. 14, 1988, Nauss was featured on the second episode of America's Most Wanted. The show featured the same Nauss segment again on Aug. 7, 1988, and has mentioned his case several times since, most recently several months ago, according to Jack Breslin, a spokesman for the show.

    It is not known what prompted the tip late last month, which suggested that Nauss might be in Cadillac, a town in northwestern Michigan. "It's baffling to us why this person decided to call out of the blue like that," Breslin said yesterday.

    But it was enough to cap five years of dogged work by detectives who devoted much of their lives to finding Nauss.

    After Nauss and Vorhauer escaped, the U.S. Marshal's Office, with local and state police, formed the Nauss-Vorshauer Task Force.

    The task force had quick success. On Sept. 8, 1986, they captured Vorhauer inside a motel near Philadelphia International Airport, where he was visiting his wife. Vorhauer was carrying a return airplane ticket to Michigan and numerous false identification documents - a driver's license and library card - giving an address in Yale, Mich., about an hour northeast of Detroit.

    There, marshals found an extensive methamphetamine laboratory. They believe Vorhauer spent a lot of time in local libraries, gathering the chemistry background necessary to manufacture the metamphetamine speed. He covered his identity with a system of phony mail drops and bogus telephone-message services. At his Yale home, marshals found $30,000 in cash, they said.

    Any hope that Vorhauer might cooperate was soon dashed.

    Still, investigators had more than their share of leads. They traveled to California, Montana, Washington State, Texas, Arizona, New Jersey, Delaware and throughout Pennsylvania pursuing leads.

    Along the way, federal marshals uncovered other crimes.

    "We would receive informant information, and when you get involved with biker gangs, inevitably you discover crimes involving drugs, false IDs, other behavior," said Dennis Matulewicz, the chief deputy marshal.

    In 1988, the marshals first used America's Most Wanted in an effort to find their fugitive. The television program ran twice, and after each, "there were hundreds of tips from every state in the country," Matulewicz said.

    The office funneled the tips out to the jurisdictions where Nauss was reported seen.

    "We had lots of leads about guys with scruffy goatees and beards. Lots of people who looked exactly like Nauss. It's unbelievable how many people fit his facial description," Matulewicz said.

    Federal marshals said last time the Nauss film clip was broadcast was several months ago on the TV show Donahue. The call about Nauss was anonymous and not all that specific, but it directed them to Michigan.

    The last three weeks were spent circulating photographs, they said. Someone - marshals won't say who - said they knew Nauss through his wife.

    "When I heard they had him, my first reaction was, 'Is it really him?' Now I can go home, go to sleep and know he's been caught," said Doyle, the deputy federal marshal who tracked Nauss for three years.
     
  6. DaisyChains

    DaisyChains Bronze Member

    "He was convicted of the Lande slaying in December 1977 after witnesses testified that Nauss had shown them Lande's body hanging by a rope in a Folcroft garage. Witnesses said Nauss told them he later cut off her hands and feet, and pulled out her teeth to prevent identification. Police believe he buried her somewhere in the New Jersey Pine Barrens under a covering of lime. Her body never was found."

    sourced from article in my last post above this.

    any body parts in the NJ pine barrens with a postmortem interval of 1970-1975 found?!
     
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  7. DaisyChains

    DaisyChains Bronze Member

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  8. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://articles.philly.com/1994-06-02/news/25834983_1_motorcycle-gang-horror-stories-true-crime


    Sex Slaying: Bad Crime, Good Book The Motorcycle Gang Murders Had It All, Crime Writer Says.

    By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
    POSTED: June 02, 1994


    In a business where careers are built one corpse at a time, Barry Bowe says the harshest truth of writing in the genre known as "true crime" is this:

    Some murders are "commercial stories," but most others are not.

    A guy kills his wife and then turns the weapon on himself? Sorry. Too common. Not commercial.

    Drug dealers are gunned down in a shootout? Yawn. Good riddance. Definitely not commercial.

    Sex, strangulation and dismemberment? Stop! Yes. Very commercial.

    Throw in, say, seven more bodies, an outlaw, drug-trafficking motorcycle gang and a prison escape by the arch villain, and, mon Dieu, it's a book, maybe even a movie, and maybe even a sequel.

    Freelance writer Bowe, 51, of Folcroft, saw all the right - that is, commercial - stuff in a story that unfolded during the 1970s and '80s right in his own southeastern Delaware County community.

    It was the story of the 1971 murder of Elizabeth Lande by Warlock motorcycle gang member Robert T. Nauss Jr. in a garage just around the corner

    from Bowe's house. Bowe has made it the subject of a book, Born to Be Wild, a paperback published this week by Warner Books.

    "The place where the murder happened was a stop on my paper route when I was a kid," Bowe, rugged looking and wearing a baseball cap and long graying hair, said in an inter-

    view at his home just off Chester Pike.

    Bowe has penned scores of articles in his four years as a writer of true- crime articles for detective magazines. He also uses the bylines Stephen Barry and Duke Foxx. The latter may turn up as the adventuring hero in a crime novel Bowe intends to write.

    "That's a setup that I'm working on," he said.

    Bowe's own thirst for adventure has taken him on many a career turn, from singing in a rock band in the 1960s to selling insurance to teaching and sports-writing in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    His book is a chilling and lurid account of sex-and-drug-linked motorcycle gang violence that gripped the river towns of Delaware County in the early and mid-1970s. It focuses particularly on the hanging death of Lande, 21, a girlfriend of Nauss.

    Her disappearance was virtually ignored for several years by all but her parents, Frank and Frances Lande of Overbrook Park, until other young women and girls with connections to the Warlocks began disappearing. A few turned up alive with horror stories of rape and beatings. The bodies of others were found in the Tinicum marshes.

    Nauss was finally arrested and convicted of the Lande murder in 1977. He was sentenced to life, but escaped from Graterford prison late in 1983, concealed in a breakfront he had helped build in the prison wood shop. He remained at large for almost seven years, married and was living a quiet life in a small Michigan town. He was found only after his story turned up on the TV show America's Most Wanted.

    Bowe described himself as a "law-and-order type of guy," who writes about crime because he believes it is something people should know about.

    "There are so many murders happening that there aren't enough reporters to go around and cover them all," he said.

    He said he had made only $6,000 in his first year as a freelance writer. ''But I was more proud of that than of any amount of money I've ever made."

    Bowe, who has an education degree from West Chester University, said he had been comfortably earning more than $50,000 a year as manager of a spa when he was suddenly fired in 1985. It was a turning point.

    Though he was eventually hired back, he said, he concluded "if a large uncaring company can fire me once, it can do it again." By 1987, he had quit on his own, he said, and moved to St. Croix in the Virgin Islands, where he got a job teaching.

    He also began covering sports for the Virgin Island Daily News, and fell in love with writing. The newspaper work, he said, "allowed me to find my voice and style and so forth.

    "The movie business is my next horizon," said Bowe. He said he had set three goals for his life "from 50 on." They were to write a book, produce and direct a movie, and to record a rock album.

    Having done the first, Bowe attended a two-month filmmaking course last fall in New York to set the stage for his second goal. He would actually like to make two movies, Born to Be Wild, and a sequel, Born to Be Wilder, both based on his book.

    Looking forward to his rock album, Bowe has set up a keyboard and sound equipment in the room with the computer he writes on.

    Frank T. Hazel, a former Delaware County district attorney, gets hero status in Born to Be Wild as the man who assembled a crack investigative team of lawmen to break up the criminal activities of the Pagan and Warlock motorcycle gangs that had begun to terrorize the county.

    Hazel, now a Delaware County Common Pleas Court judge, said yesterday that he had yet to read Bowe's account, but that being a hero was "better to be than a villain."

    He described the Nauss era as "a time I would never give up, and a time I would never like to live through again."

    Another protagonist in the book is lawyer James DelBello, now 54 and in private practice. He was the prosecuting attorney at Nauss' 1977 trial. DelBello said yesterday that he had a copy of the book but "my son grabbed it, and I haven't been able to read it."

    DelBello said it was "really great to think that (the case) still has some vitality after all these years."

    He commended Bowe for having "a lot of energy to get it done," and added that he hoped to be played by Richard Gere in the movie.
     
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  9. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://articles.philly.com/1990-11-...-pennsylvania-prison-warlocks-motorcycle-gang


    A 'Good Man' Hid A Murderous Past

    By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
    POSTED: November 04, 1990

    LUNA PIER, Mich. — He was a killer on the run. She worked as a government clerk in Detroit. They met in Dearborn, and when Robert Thomas Nauss Jr. introduced himself, it was as "Rick," a lonely orphan who wanted to settle down and have a family.

    "When she met him, it was like she'd died and gone to heaven, he was so nice," said her father.

    Actually, it was another woman who had died. Elizabeth Ann Lande, 21, a beauty pageant winner, was murdered and dismembered in Delaware County in 1971. And on Tuesday, Nauss, the man who murdered her, was re-arrested in Michigan - plucked from the placid small-town life he had been leading and returned to the Pennsylvania prison he had escaped in 1983.

    "I feel like I've had my heart ripped out," said his wife, Toni Ruark, who married Nauss shortly after meeting him in 1984, and raised three sons with him. "I can't believe it's the same person."

    Neither could anyone else in this lake-front town where Nauss, 38, had spent the last 2 1/2 years. Nauss did such a good job transforming himself

    from criminal to family man that by the time federal authorities arrested him, he left behind a bevy of stunned in-laws and friends - several of whom said they wished he had never been caught.

    "If I'd've recognized him (as a wanted fugitive), I'd have said, 'Rick, get out of town,' " said Alfred Twigg, 59, a fishing buddy. "I'd give him a reference as soon as my own brother."

    Added another friend, Joe Meader, 52, "If you don't want him down there (in Pennsylvania), send him back here. He's a good man."

    The story of Nauss' seven years on the run is a classic tale of Jekyll and Hyde, said Kenneth Briggs of the U.S. Marshal's Office in Detroit.

    It is the story of a man who killed one woman, then fooled another. Toni Ruark, 43, thought she had found happiness - but it turned out she, along with her sons, was someone else's cover.

    "They just wonder when he's coming back," she said of her children. "I just told them the truth."

    Which is more than Nauss did.

    *

    Robert Nauss was a notorious drug dealer, rapist and murderer when he escaped from Graterford Prison on Nov. 17, 1983. A leader of the Warlocks motorcycle gang in Delaware County during the 1970s, he was convicted in the 1976 gang rape of a Media woman and was serving a life sentence for the grisly killing of Lande, 21, a former girlfriend.

    Lande's body was never found, but witnesses said Nauss showed them the young woman's body, hanging upside down in his garage. Later, Nauss cut off Lande's hands and feet and pulled out her teeth to prevent her from being identified, witnesses said.

    Nauss was sentenced to life in 1977. But in 1983, he managed to escape from Graterford with another inmate, Hans Vorhauer. They hid in a large cabinet when it was shipped out of the prison furniture shop where they had built it together.

    Six months later, Nauss was in Dearborn, where he met Ruark.

    "There are 172 motorcycle gangs in the Detroit area," said Briggs, "and some of them have to have ties to the Warlocks." They would have offered him help in burrowing underground, Briggs said.

    When Nauss did re-emerge, he was no longer Robert Nauss, terrifying motorcycle gang member and murderer.

    He was Rick Ferrer, a cleanshaven, gentle man who had a knack for carpentry - and a magically empty past. He made friends, started a family, and took his oldest son to the Mayo Clinic when he got ill. His drink of choice was Gatorade.

    "His only vice is he smoked a lot," said Joan LeBlanc, a friend.

    Nauss borrowed his new name from a former cellmate in Graterford, officials said.

    He shaved off his rebel goatee. He took to wearing a baseball cap, flannel shirts and chinos. "We thought he was a prosperous tradesman," said Mike Briskey, a friend.

    Briggs said Nauss even tried to obscure some of the tattoos that embroidered his arms - among them a swastika, a "Born To Lose" brand and a blue parrot.

    Those Nauss couldn't obscure, he hid.

    "He always wore long-sleeved shirts and a baseball cap," recalled Clyde Evans, a neighbor in Luna Pier. "Even in summer. We never saw the tattoos."

    And about his past, Nauss was always vague.

    "He told us he was an orphan, and that his father had been killed in a car accident," said LeBlanc, 54. "He said there were five or six of them in his family, and when his father died, his mother couldn't raise him. So he grew up in an orphanage."

    Like other friends of Nauss', LeBlanc said she felt too sorry for him to question him about his past.

    "It was like opening a can of worms," she said. "You almost felt bad for asking."

    His background - Nauss' parents live in a middle-class section of Darby - may have helped him blend in with law-abiding society, officials said.

    But his best disguise was probably his own family.

    Ruark met Nauss in 1984, six months after his escape. She was single and 37, and working as a data processing clerk for the legal department of Wayne County, which encompasses Detroit.

    She appreciated the way he treated her, said her father, Marv Ruark of Cadillac, Mich. "I liked him too," the father said.

    Nauss and Ruark began living together in 1984, and a few months later, after she became pregnant, they were married as Mr. and Mrs. Richard Ferrer.

    Ruark docilely followed him from town to town in Michigan, never questioning where Nauss got his money, or why they had to move so often, Briggs said.

    Officials speculate that Nauss may have been dealing methamphetamine while he was on the loose, keeping his business hidden from his wife. She told investigators he sometimes left home "for two or three days at a time, and returned with $2,000 or $3,000 in cash," Briggs, of the U.S. Marshal's Office, said.

    "She was naive," Briggs said. "He could have told her anything, and she would have believed it."

    Together, the couple produced the close-knit family that placed him above the suspicion of nearly everyone they met - even the local police. One week before his arrest, Nauss shook the hand of a Luna Pier sergeant, who joked, ''You must be one of our upstanding citizens - we've never been called to your house."

    Even now, Toni Ruark finds it hard to believe that her husband was a murderer.

    "He never beat me, he never beat the kids," she said. "He got angry, sure; everyone gets angry. But he never hit me."

    Marv Ruark said Nauss was polite and energetic and seemed to be a good provider. He loved to fish; when the two men went fishing, Nauss would ask Ruark to bait the hooks and clean the fish.

    "He never talked much about his background, never mentioned any family," Marv Ruark said.

    The couple had three sons - now 3, 4 and 5 years old. They bought property in Luna Pier and Waiska Bay, a remote lakefront community just a few miles

    from Canada, putting the property in her name.

    Nauss never held down a job in Michigan. He described himself as self- employed, telling friends and family that he owned 14 rental properties and lived off the rents he collected. But police could find no records of a rental business after his arrest. He paid for everything in cash, friends say, and occasionally used checks in his wife's name.

    In Luna Pier, the couple and their three boys lived in a ranch house with three picture windows facing Lake Erie. Nauss bought it as an investment, and was fixing it up to sell.

    Nauss had also accumulated other possessions - a maroon Cadillac, a 27-foot Sportcruiser and a GMC truck. Police searched all of them for signs of his life as a criminal. But all they found was a list, in neat print, of Nauss' 10 favorite fishing spots.

    "He was always trying to help people," said a friend, Willy Bally. "Help them, or take them fishing."

    On Thursday, the night before Nauss was flown back to Pennsylvania, Toni Ruark left her three children with her parents and drove an hour north to Detroit to see the man she had married. Nauss was in jail, having just admitted in court who he really was.

    Among other things, she asked Nauss about their future, said Briggs. She wanted to know if she should sell the house and move to Pennsylvania to be with him.

     
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  10. spike

    spike Bronze Member

    :thud:
     
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  11. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.amazon.com/Born-Be-Wild...id=1465303675&sr=1-6&keywords=born+to+be+wild


    Born to Be Wild
    by Barry Bowe

    [​IMG]


    A distinct line exists between right and wrong. Some people never dream of crossing that line. Others cross it willingly . . .

    At nineteen, Bobby Nauss joins the Warlocks Motorcycle Gang and plunges into a life of crime.

    At 2:30 A.M. on December 12, 1971, he has sex with his girlfriend. At 3:30 A.M. he kills her and disposes of her body.

    As time passes, four teenaged girls are kidnapped, raped, and murdered. Because their bodies are found in or around the Tinicum Marsh, they become known as “The Marsh Murders.” The victims share three things in common - sex, drugs, and an association with members of the Warlocks.

    It takes the mobilization and galvanization of local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies across the country to deal with the outlaw bikers and determine who did what, where, and when.

    Born to Be Wild is a true story of rape, murder, and deception. The book drags you into the misogynistic world of outlaw motorcycle gangs and places you behind prison bars.

    Justice takes twenty-one years to reach Bobby Nauss.
     
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  12. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Bobby Nauss

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Elizabeth Ann Lande

    [​IMG]



    Infamous Garage

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.findthemissing.org/en/cases/2508/2

    NamUs MP # 2508
    Elizabeth Lande
    [​IMG]
    Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania
    21 year old white female
    Case Report - NamUs MP # 2508

    Case Information
    Status Missing
    First name Elizabeth
    Middle name Ann
    Last name Lande
    Nickname/Alias
    Date last seen December 12, 1971 00:00
    Date entered 07/15/2009
    Age last seen 21 to 21 years old
    Age now 66 years old
    Race White
    Ethnicity Other
    Sex Female
    Height (inches) 50.0 to 54.0
    Weight (pounds) 110.0 to 120.0

    Circumstances
    City Philadelphia
    State Pennsylvania
    Zip code
    County Philadelphia

    Physical
    Hair color Blond/Strawberry
    Head hair
    Blonde
    Body hair

    Facial hair

    Left eye color Green
    Right eye color Green

    Clothing
    bell-bottom jeans
    Footwear
    platform shoes.
    Jewelry

    Eyewear

    Accessories
    long brown coat with black fake-fur trim

    Brown suede pocketbook

    Dental
    Status: Dental information / charting is currently not available

    DNA
    Status: Sample is currently not available

    Fingerprint Information
    Status: Fingerprint information is currently not available

    Investigating Agency
    Title
    First name
    Last name
    Phone 215-686-1776
    Website
    Case number
    Date reported
    Jurisdiction
    Agency Philadelphia Police Department
    Address 1
    Address 2
    City
    State
    Zip code
    Comments
     
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  14. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  15. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://pennsylvaniamissing.com/lizlande.html

    Pennsylvania Missing Persons

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    Elizabeth Ann Lande
    Missing since December 12, 1971 from the Overbrook Park section of Philadelphia.

    Vital Statistics
    Age at time of disappearance: 21
    Height & Weight: 5'0", 110 lbs
    Distinguishing Characteristics: White female. Green eyes. Long blonde hair, past shoulder-length, wavy at the ends.
    Dentals: straight and even teeth.
    Clothing: long brown coat with black fake-fur trim, bell-bottom jeans and platform shoes. Brown suede pocketbook.

    Circumstance of Disappearance

    On the evening of Saturday, December 11, 1971, with her parents out of town on a week-long cruise, Liz Lande and two of her girlfriends spent the evening talking and watching television. At around midnight, Liz received a phone call from her boyfriend, Bobby Nauss, a member of the Warlocks Motorcycle Club. Nauss asked Liz to spend the weekend with him. Concerned about the late hour and Nauss's reputation, Liz's friends tried to talk her out of going - to no avail. The friends left - they never saw Liz alive again.

    At about 1:50 am, a neighbor who lived across the street from the Lande residence heard a noise outside. When he looked out of his bedroom window, he saw Liz walk out of the front door to her house, to the sidewalk and get into a waiting gold-colored Toronado.

    In the early morning hours of Monday, December 13th, Elizabeth Lande was seen hanging from the rafters in a garage behind the the apartment house of one of Nauss' friends. It was this friend who helped Nauss dispose of Liz's body, allegedly in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey.

    On July 12, 1977, almost six years after Liz disappeared, the same friend - turned witness - attempted to lead Law Enforcement to the location in the Pine Barrens where he said he had helped Nauss bury Liz's body. The location was near Williamstown, NJ, about 16 miles southeast of Philadelphia. The previously heavily wooded area was now occupied by housing subdivisions. The witness tried several times to pinpoint the burial site, and the officers dug up each location, but failed to locate Liz's remains.

    On December 9, 1977 Robert Nauss was convicted for the murder of Elizabeth Lande. Her body has never been found.


     
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  16. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

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  17. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://pennsylvaniamissing.com/lizlande.html

    In the early morning hours of Monday, December 13th, Elizabeth Lande was seen hanging from the rafters in a garage behind the the apartment house of one of Nauss' friends. It was this friend who helped Nauss dispose of Liz's body, allegedly in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey.

    On July 12, 1977, almost six years after Liz disappeared, the same friend - turned witness - attempted to lead Law Enforcement to the location in the Pine Barrens where he said he had helped Nauss bury Liz's body. The location was near Williamstown, NJ, about 16 miles southeast of Philadelphia.


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  18. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://pennsylvaniamissing.com/lizlande.html

    On July 12, 1977, almost six years after Liz disappeared, the same friend - turned witness - attempted to lead Law Enforcement to the location in the Pine Barrens where he said he had helped Nauss bury Liz's body. The location was near Williamstown, NJ, about 16 miles southeast of Philadelphia. The previously heavily wooded area was now occupied by housing subdivisions. The witness tried several times to pinpoint the burial site, and the officers dug up each location, but failed to locate Liz's remains.


    www.nj.gov
    New Jersey Pine Barrens

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  19. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    The inmate who escaped from Graterford Prison with Bobby Nauss was Hans Vorhauer.

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  20. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Thomas Robert Nauss Jr.

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