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FL LAKE PANASOFFKEE JANE DOE: WF, 17-24, found under bridge - Feb 1971 - From Europe / Greece?

Discussion in 'Unidentified 1900 to 1979' started by SheWhoMustNotBeNamed, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed Administrator Staff Member

    [​IMG]

    This unidentified female was found on February 19, 1971 in Sumter County, Florida. She was found in the water under the Lake Panasoffkee Bridge along Interstate 75.

    It is estimated that she had been deceased for several weeks.

    The Jane Doe was 17-25 years old at the time of her death. She stood between 5’00”-5’05” tall and weighed about 110-120 pounds. She had long straight brown hair.

    She was found wearing plaid green pants, a matching green shirt and a shawl with a green and white print. She also wore a gold ladies Baylor wrist watch and a yellow gold ring with a clear stone on her left ring finger. She also wore a thin gold chain necklace.

    An anthropological exam of her bones revealed that she had an orthopedic surgery to her right ankle, most likely within a few years prior to her death. Additionally, periostitis was found on her lower right leg in the process of healing. This might have caused her some pain or discomfort. A dental examination of her teeth revealed that she had extensive dental work completed. She had several fillings and a porcelain crown on one of her top middle teeth.

    Forensic testing of her teeth and hair determined that this female was a foreigner that arrived in the United States from between a year and 2 months before her death. The analysis determined that this female is likely from southern Europe, possibly Greece.

    The above images were completed by the Forensic Anthropology Department at the University of South Florida. One is a facial reconstruction of what the female may have looked like in life. The second is a composite of the clothing she was found wearing.

    [​IMG]

    NCMEC - http://www.missingkids.com/poster/NCMU/1202391/1

    Edited by staff to add media

    http://www.crimewatchers.net/forum/...nder-bridge-feb-1971-from-europe-greece.2055/
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2018
    Akoya, spike and Kimster like this.
  2. SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed Administrator Staff Member

    On February 19, 1971, the body of a white female homicide victim was discovered under the Lake Panasoffkee Bridge at Interstate 75 in Sumter County. The victim has never been identified.

    Estimated age Adult - Pre 30
    Minimum age 17 years
    Maximum age 24 years
    Race White
    Sex Female
    Weight (pounds) 110, Estimated
    Height (inches) 63, Estimated

    Body conditions Not recognizable - Decomposing/putrefaction
    Estimated postmortem interval Weeks

    "Watson-Jones" orthopedic surgery to right ankle probably between 1967 and 1970

    Appears to have given birth.
    Perimortem trauma consists of fractured right ribs 2 and 3.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    NAMUS - https://identifyus.org/en/cases/6040
     
    Akoya and spike like this.
  3. Interesting case. A1071 will always be a truly haunting case. It's a miracle she was even seen, considering her green clothes matched the lake algae. I've always found it odd that she was found with a ring on her ring finger, indicating she was married or engaged which when coupled with the fact that she'd likely given birth makes that all the more compelling. Additionally, the belt was a size mens 36 which is an extra-large size which makes me think the perpetrator was larger than average. Also, when looking at her bones, it appears as though she'd had a growth stunt at some point in her childhood. In 2012 it was revealed she'd had surgery on her right ankle and further up, her right leg showed signs of periostitis. Because of these two things, it's possible she might have limped. For a suspect, Paul John Knowles fits the murder method and target, but at the time, he was on parole, which would have made it difficult for him to kill.

    The biggest lead we've had was when a greek missing persons show aired the case and received a call. The caller claims A1071 was an adolescent friend of hers named Konstantina. The caller stated that she'd grown up in Greece and had a brother serving in the Navy. They said they both went to the same school in the Athens suburbs during their teen years. This school was apparently a migration school which sent students abroad after finishing their studies. The caller states that they'd lost contact with Konstantina, but didn't think much of it because this was a common occurrence. This could all be dismissed as a hoax, but the dates line up and the watch she had was sold where the caller said they lived.

    Here's a picture of Konstantina and to me, she looks a lot like the most recent composite

    [​IMG]
     
    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed and Akoya like this.
  4. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Miss_Lake_Panasoffkee

    Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee

    Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee or Little Miss Panasoffkee is the name given to an unidentified young woman found on February 19, 1971, in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida. It is believed that she was a murder victim.

    The murder remains unsolved despite the forensic reconstruction of the victim's face in 1971 and 2012. The case was featured on the television show Unsolved Mysteries in 1993.

    On February 19, 1971, two teenage hitchhikers discovered a partially submerged body floating beneath a highway overpass in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida. Authorities retrieved the fully clothed, badly decomposed body of a young woman from the lake. The body had no identification papers.

    The body was dressed in a green shirt, green plaid pants, and a green floral poncho. Also found were a white gold watch and a gold necklace. On her ring finger there was a gold ring with a transparent stone, indicating that she may have been married.

    A forensic examination of the remains was conducted by Dr. William Schutze. Schutze concluded that the victim had been killed about 30 days before being found. A man's size–36 belt was fastened around her neck, strongly indicating strangulation as the cause of death.


    The body was exhumed in February 1986 for further forensic examination.

    The woman was determined to have been between 17 and 24 years old when she died, weighing about 115 pounds. She had dark hair, brown eyes, and prominent cheekbones. She was between 5 feet, 2 inches and 5 feet, 5 inches in height. She had received extensive dental work, including numerous silver tooth fillings. She had a porcelain crown on one of her upper right teeth.

    It was determined that she had borne at least two children before her death. One of her ribs had been fractured at the time of death, leading investigators to theorize that the killer had possibly knelt on her while he strangled her with the belt.

    [​IMG]
    Additional facial reconstruction of the victim.
    Investigators initially believed the woman to be either of European or Native American ancestry. A further exhumation and examination of the remains, conducted in 2012, established that she was of European descent. An examination of Harris lines in the victim's bones indicated that an illness or malnutrition had briefly arrested her growth in childhood.

    Examining the lead isotopes in the victim's teeth, a geological scientist deduced that the victim had undoubtedly spent her childhood and adolescence in southern Europe close to the sea — most likely south of the Greek city of Athens — until within a year of her murder. The geological scientist, George Kamenov, pinpointed the most likely place as the fishing port of Laurium, Greece.

    Given that there is a large Greek-American population in Tarpon Springs (about 117 kilometers (73 mi) from Lake Panasoffkee), and that the victim had been dead for about 30 days and had likely lived in Greece, it was possible to conclude that she had traveled to the United States to attend an Epiphany celebration.

    Forensic examination of her hair supported the theory that she had been visiting temporarily. This was indicated by the fact that she had been in Florida for less than two months before her death.

    An orthopedic surgery procedure, known as the "Watson-Jones" technique, had been performed on her right ankle when she was about 16 years old. This operation—which involved stretching the tendon by screws drilled into the bone—would most likely have been performed to rectify a chronic instability which would likely have seen the victim sprain her ankle several times before the operation. Periostitis was found in her right leg, which may have been discomforting and noticeable to the victim.

    A further development with the case occurred when it was featured on a Greek crime show. A woman came forward to say she believed the facial reconstructions looked like a girl she knew called Konstantina. She and Konstantina attended a prep school in Greece, where they were trained to be domestic help. After finishing the course, the school sent their students abroad to Australia or America as part of a two-year work contract. The school was funded by the International Organisation for Migration. The woman lost contact with Konstantina when she was sent to Australia and Konstantina to America. Konstantina arrived in America in exactly the same time as the forensic testing indicated the victim


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    SheWhoMustNotBeNamed likes this.
  5. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  6. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://unsolvedmysteries.wikia.com/wiki/Little_Miss_Panasoffkee

    Little Miss Panasoffkee

    Real Name: Unrevealed
    Nicknames: Little Miss Panasoffkee
    Location: Panasoffkee, Florida
    Date: February 19, 1971

    Details: On February 19, 1971, two teenagers hitchhiking along Interstate 75 found the body of a murdered girl who had been tossed from the Lake Panasoffkee Bridge in Florida. The woman was in her late teens or early twenties, carried no identification, and had been dead for several weeks. Police were unable to identify the woman or locate her killer, and she was laid to rest six months later. Ten years later, the case was re-opened by Sheriff Jamie Adams and her body was exhumed. Sheriff Adams had forensic anthropologist William Maples investigate the body of the young woman. He discovered that she had orthopedic surgery to her right ankle, which was done by drilling holes in the leg bone and then wound the tendon, by the Watson-Jones technique. Sheriff Adams next contacted forensic artist Linda Galeener, who made new composite sketches of the woman along with age regression sketches to show how the victim may have looked at younger ages. Flyers were sent by Sheriff Adams throughout the country with the new sketches, but her identity remains a mystery. The woman was estimated to be 5'2", about 100 pounds, and approximately 20 years old. She had great amounts of surgery done to her legs and extensive dental work. She had also given birth to at least one child. Police suspect the woman may have been well-cared for, left a family behind, and might have been a runaway.
    Suspects: Police believe that after the woman is identified, her killer would be identified as well. The killer might have worn a man's size 36 belt.
    Extra Notes: This segment originally aired on the October 14, 1992 episode of Unsolved Mysteries. It was also profiled on Cold Case Files.

    [​IMG]
    Photograph of "Konstantina"

    Results: Unresolved. In 2012, a new analysis of her isotopes unveiled her origins to be from Greece. In the fall of 2012, her case was featured on a Greek missing persons show. A viewer called in and identified the unidentified woman as a friend of hers, "Konstantina," who had a brother serving in the Navy near Lavrio. She said that the two both went to a school in Kifisia, a suburb of Athens, and were taught home economics. The caller, Konstantina, and several other girls were part of a program for the school that sent them to either the United States or Australia, with a two year contact for work. The caller said that she had lost contact with Konstantina when they were both sent to separate countries; the caller to Australia, and Konstantina to the United States in 1970. When the Greek show was updated, another viewer called in claiming that two other girls went to the United States with Konstantina and that their whereabouts were also unknown. However, a daughter of one of the girls allegedly with Konstantina saw the updated show and called to say her mother was alive and was actually sent to Australia, not the United States. As of yet, no new leads have surfaced on the whereabouts of Konstantina, suggesting that she may actually be "Little Miss Panasoffkee." However, a positive identification has not yet been determined as Konstantina's relatives have not been located. Her killer has never been identified.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/470uffl.html


    The Doe Network:
    Case File 470UFFL


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    Unidentified White Female

      • The victim was discovered on February 19, 1971 in Lake Panasoffkee, Sumter County, Florida
      • Estimated Date of Death: Two to three weeks prior to discovery
      • Killed by Homicide by strangulation
    Vital Statistics

      • Estimated age: 17-24 years old - believed to be in her early 20's
      • Approximate Height and Weight: 5'2 to 5'5; 110-120 lbs.
      • Distinguishing Characteristics: Possibly mixed with Native. Dark hair and brown eyes.
      • Skeletal Findings: Orthopedic surgery had been performed on her right ankle due to instability in the ankle. The procedure, known as a "Watson-Jones" technique, involved drilling two small holes in the ankle bone and winding a tendon through them. The surgery probably occurred between 1967 and 1970. She had given birth to at least one child.
      • Clothing: A shawl with a green and white print; plaid green pants; a solid green shirt
      • Jewelry: A white gold ladies Baylor wrist watch on her left hand, a yellow gold ring with a clear stone on her left ring finger and a small/thin gold necklace
      • Dentals: Available. She had extensive dental work, suggesting she received regular healthcare
      • DNA: Available.
    Case History
    The victim's decomposed body was spotted in Lake Panasoffkee by two hitchhikers crossing the Panasoffkee bridge on February 19, 1971.
    Police were notified and it was quickly determined that the girl had been strangled by a man's size 36 belt, which was still around her throat.

    Forensic artist Linda Galeener created a composite of the victim. When no one came to claim her body, Galeener was asked to create age-regression drawings, showing what the girl may have looked like at ages 6 and 12. Again, no one identified her.

    The victims is nicknamed "Little Miss Panasoffkee" and it is quite possible that she was a runaway.
    Authorities believe she was murdered else where and dumped off the bridge.

    The victim came to the United States within one to three months of her death. It has been determined that she was of Greek descent and could have arrived in the U.S. directly from there just prior to her death. It is also possible that she could have come from or been directly related to Greek residents of Lavrion, Greece, based on dental testing.

    Investigators
    If you have any information about this case please contact:
    Sumter County Sheriff's Office
    Detective Darren Norris 352-569-1600
    E-Mail
    OR
    District 5 Medical Examiner
    352-326-5961
    Email
    You may remain anonymous when submitting information.

    Agency Case Number:
    A-10-71

    NCIC Number:
    U276515052
    Please refer to this number when contacting any agency with information regarding this case.

    Source Information:
    Unsolved Mysteries episode from 1991
    Daily Sun
    NamUs



     
  8. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://kidnappingmurderandmayhem.blogspot.com/2010/02/searching-for-identity-little-miss-lake.html

    Kidnapping, Murder and Mayhem

    WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2010
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Unquiet Rest
    by Robert A. Waters

    Sometime in the waning winter of 1971, a young woman was murdered. Her killer placed a leather belt around her neck, pulled it tight, and held on until the girl quit struggling. Then he dumped her off a bridge in central Florida.

    She has no name. Or at least not a name that anybody knows. Shortly after she died, the young woman was discovered floating in the black acidic waters just beneath the Lake Panasoffkee Bridge on Interstate 75. For nearly forty years, all efforts to identify her have failed.

    The Sumter County Sheriff’s Office has investigated the case with a fierce doggedness. Before the advent of computers, investigators sent out flyers describing the case to thousands of police agencies across the country. They contacted the news media in hopes of generating stories about the case. Investigators even contacted the popular television show “Unsolved Mysteries” and the case was featured in a chilling segment that has been repeated many times. In the beginning, numerous leads came in--all were investigated, including hundreds of calls from parents who thought the remains might be their missing daughter.

    In 1986, Sheriff James Adams gave the woman a nickname: “Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee.” He arranged for her body to be exhumed and examined by forensic anthropologist Dr. William Maples. In addition to what was already known, the autopsy uncovered several key facts about the young woman.

    She was Caucasian with possibly a touch of Native American ancestry. She was five-feet-two and weighed about 100 pounds. The woman was between 18 and 23 years of age, and had given birth to at least one child, probably two. At some point in her life, the woman had been well-taken care of. She had extensive dental work which included silver fillings and a porcelain cap. An orthopedic surgical procedure known as the Watson-Jones technique had repaired a weakness in her right ankle that caused her to fall and sprain it many times. After learning of the Watson-Jones procedure, the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office advertised in medical journals hoping to jog the memory of some doctor who might have performed the surgery.

    Several composite sketches have been done over the years. They were shown on “Unsolved Mysteries” and have been publicized over the Internet.

    Investigators theorize that Little Miss Panasoffkee was raised in a caring family that provided for her. At some point, possibly in her teens, her life may have gone off track. At the time of her death, four lower and two upper teeth were missing, pointing to a later lack of dental care or violence. The young woman may have become estranged from her family. “We believe it’s a person from a disenfranchised family,” said Captain Gary Brannen. “[She’s] not in the family fold, so to speak.”

    Recently, a section of one of the girl’s bones was sent to the FBI for genetic analysis. A DNA profile was extracted, so if her family is ever located, she can be identified and returned home.

    A few other pieces of information are available: Little Miss Panasoffkee was probably right-handed; she was wearing a thin gold-colored neck chain; she wore a gold-colored ring with a transparent stone on her right hand; and she had a seventeen-jewel Baylor watch on her left wrist.

    Little Miss Panasoffkee’s killer has escaped justice for four decades. It is unlikely that he’ll ever be caught.

    While the murderer has gone about his own life, the lost soul of an unknown daughter rests fitfully in a grave far away from home. In the Parable of the Prodigal Son, Jesus tells of a straying child who “came to his senses” and returned home to his father. Little Miss Panasoffkee never had that chance.

    If anyone has any information about this case, please contact Captain Gary Brannen at the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office by telephone at (352) 793-0222 or (352) 793-0278.
     
  9. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://kidnappingmurderandmayhem.blogspot.com/2010/02/searching-for-identity-little-miss-lake.html

    Kidnapping, Murder and Mayhem

    WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2010
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Unquiet Rest
    by Robert A. Waters

    Sometime in the waning winter of 1971, a young woman was murdered. Her killer placed a leather belt around her neck, pulled it tight, and held on until the girl quit struggling. Then he dumped her off a bridge in central Florida.

    She has no name. Or at least not a name that anybody knows. Shortly after she died, the young woman was discovered floating in the black acidic waters just beneath the Lake Panasoffkee Bridge on Interstate 75. For nearly forty years, all efforts to identify her have failed.

    The Sumter County Sheriff’s Office has investigated the case with a fierce doggedness. Before the advent of computers, investigators sent out flyers describing the case to thousands of police agencies across the country. They contacted the news media in hopes of generating stories about the case. Investigators even contacted the popular television show “Unsolved Mysteries” and the case was featured in a chilling segment that has been repeated many times. In the beginning, numerous leads came in--all were investigated, including hundreds of calls from parents who thought the remains might be their missing daughter.

    In 1986, Sheriff James Adams gave the woman a nickname: “Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee.” He arranged for her body to be exhumed and examined by forensic anthropologist Dr. William Maples. In addition to what was already known, the autopsy uncovered several key facts about the young woman.

    She was Caucasian with possibly a touch of Native American ancestry. She was five-feet-two and weighed about 100 pounds. The woman was between 18 and 23 years of age, and had given birth to at least one child, probably two. At some point in her life, the woman had been well-taken care of. She had extensive dental work which included silver fillings and a porcelain cap. An orthopedic surgical procedure known as the Watson-Jones technique had repaired a weakness in her right ankle that caused her to fall and sprain it many times. After learning of the Watson-Jones procedure, the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office advertised in medical journals hoping to jog the memory of some doctor who might have performed the surgery.

    Several composite sketches have been done over the years. They were shown on “Unsolved Mysteries” and have been publicized over the Internet.

    Investigators theorize that Little Miss Panasoffkee was raised in a caring family that provided for her. At some point, possibly in her teens, her life may have gone off track. At the time of her death, four lower and two upper teeth were missing, pointing to a later lack of dental care or violence. The young woman may have become estranged from her family. “We believe it’s a person from a disenfranchised family,” said Captain Gary Brannen. “[She’s] not in the family fold, so to speak.”

    Recently, a section of one of the girl’s bones was sent to the FBI for genetic analysis. A DNA profile was extracted, so if her family is ever located, she can be identified and returned home.

    A few other pieces of information are available: Little Miss Panasoffkee was probably right-handed; she was wearing a thin gold-colored neck chain; she wore a gold-colored ring with a transparent stone on her right hand; and she had a seventeen-jewel Baylor watch on her left wrist.

    Little Miss Panasoffkee’s killer has escaped justice for four decades. It is unlikely that he’ll ever be caught.

    While the murderer has gone about his own life, the lost soul of an unknown daughter rests fitfully in a grave far away from home. In the Parable of the Prodigal Son, Jesus tells of a straying child who “came to his senses” and returned home to his father. Little Miss Panasoffkee never had that chance.

    If anyone has any information about this case, please contact Captain Gary Brannen at the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office by telephone at (352) 793-0222 or (352) 793-0278.
     
  10. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  11. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://justicefornativewomen.blogspot.com/2016/06/little-miss-lake-panasoffkee-discovered.html

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Jane Doe was discovered by two teenage hitchhikers on June 12th, 1971 partially submerged and floating under a highway overpass in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida. It is believed she was murdered about 30 days prior to her discovery and is believed to have been between the ages of 17 and 24. A size 36 man's belt was found still wrapped around her neck. Jane was between 5'2 and 5'5 and weight approximately 110-120 pounds. She had had orthopedic surgery on her right ankle to make it more stable. She is mother to at least one child. Due to her dental records, it's possible she is either from Greece or lived there for a time. Age regressions have also been done on Jane Doe but no one identified her. It's possible she was a runaway and likely that she was murdered elsewhere and dumped off the overpass. No arrests have been made and she remains unidentified.

    If you have any information regarding the identity or death of Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee, you are encouraged to contact the Sumter County Sheriff's Office at 352-569-1600.
    Tribal Information: Sources disagree on Jane Doe's ethnic background. Due to dental testing it is possible she is a native of Greece or lived there for some time. Other sources state that she is likely white with possible Native American ancestry.
     
  12. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/public...er-that-may-be-tied-to-tarpon-springs/1238126

    Clues emerge in cold case murder that may be tied to Tarpon Springs
    By Peter Jamison, Times Staff Writer
    Saturday, June 30, 2012 12:03pm

    TARPON SPRINGS — It's the stuff of popular mystery fiction: A young woman from a European village disappears in Florida in the wake of Epiphany, the Greek Orthodox celebration that annually attracts thousands to the coastal community of Tarpon Springs.

    The story might be true. It might not. But Sumter County Sheriff's Office Detective Darren Norris thinks he knows how it ends — with a rotting body floating in a lake fringed by pine woods in Central Florida.

    In fact, the end of the story is the only part that's certain. On Feb. 19, 1971, hitchhikers discovered a woman's corpse beneath the Interstate 75 bridge over the marshy southern rim of Lake Panasoffkee north of Bushnell.

    She was carrying no ID. With what remained of the body, a medical examiner determined she was strangled and had probably been dumped in the lake at least 30 days before she was found.

    She was buried at the Oak Grove Cemetery in Wildwood, then exhumed in 1986 for re-examination. A 1993 episode of Unsolved Mysteries highlighted the case of the Jane Doe who had become known as "Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee."

    Decades passed. No leads emerged. It became one of those cold cases kicked around at every police agency, passed from one generation of homicide investigators to the next.

    Then, earlier this year, Norris came across an article on forensics innovations spearheaded by an anthropology professor at the University of South Florida.

    Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee was getting ready to emerge again into the public eye, and this time, investigators believed she could be traced to the Tampa Bay area. Whether the rest of her story would emerge this time was anyone's guess.

    • • •

    Erin Kimmerle is a Tampa forensic anthropologist with a reputation for helping to crack seemingly insoluble cold cases. Her USF lab's Cold Case Project has pioneered methods for attaching names to unidentified bodies discovered in the state of Florida.

    When Norris read about her work, he thought she could lend a hand with his 41-year-old cold case. He was right.

    Working from photographs and detailed police records of the corpse and rags of clothing found in Lake Panasoffkee in 1971, Kimmerle's lab developed the most complete picture yet of the victim.

    She was young — between 17 and 24 years old, the lab hypothesized — and petite, less than 5 feet 5 inches tall and about 115 pounds. She had dark hair and brown eyes, prominent cheekbones and a strong nose. At the time she was killed, she was wearing green plaid pants, a matching green shirt and a green floral poncho.

    The woman's skeletal structure suggested she was of European descent, Kimmerle said. High-density strands in her bones, called Harris Lines, indicated she had endured some kind of childhood ailment that briefly arrested her growth — perhaps malnutrition or sickness.

    It was all new information to the Sumter County Sheriff's Office.

    "It's not uncommon at all that when we reanalyze cold cases, we get new information," Kimmerle said.

    More was to come.

    Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee's remains were sent to George Kamenov in the department of geological sciences at the University of Florida. Kamenov tried to determine where she was from by studying the lead isotopes in her teeth.

    His method is based on the way elements from the environment leave their traces in the human body. Lead accumulates in children's teeth as they mature, until the tooth enamel seals off what can be viewed as a kind of snapshot of the place they lived.

    The method is particularly useful in guessing whether somebody was born in Europe or the United States, Kamenov said. The teeth of those who grew up in Europe carry a distinctive lead signal, since European countries used leaded gasoline from Australia at a time when North American countries did not.

    Kamenov went further. Comparing Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee's lead levels to those on record in various parts of Europe, he was able to pinpoint her possible hometown: Lavrion, a small fishing port southeast of Athens, Greece.

    Detectives had never worked from so detailed a picture of Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee. It got them thinking: Not too far down I-75 was a large Greek community that sprawled from Clearwater through Tarpon Springs up to New Port Richey.

    The drive from those towns to the area where the body was dumped would have taken almost two hours. But maybe it wasn't too far for whoever had strangled Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee, a person who might not have wanted to deposit a victim too close to home.

    Her estimated time of death would have fallen in the weeks after Epiphany. Could she have traveled from Greece to Florida to celebrate?

    "I was excited. Everyone here was excited," Norris said. "It gave us a much better place to target. Now we have the information that might actually lead us to identify this person, and maybe even solve the case."

    • • •

    On Friday, Norris mailed almost 6,000 pamphlets to residents and businesses in Tarpon Springs. He's hoping that someone might recognize the composite sketch of the dead woman that stares out impassively from the flyer with brown, almond-shaped eyes. He has approached the Tarpon Springs Police Department and community leaders in the hope of new leads. It could be that whoever killed Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee is still alive and in the area, he believes.

    "Anything's possible," he said.

    It's also entirely possible that the quest for a gulf coast connection will be futile.

    The biographical and geographical profile of Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee pieced together by scientists deals in probabilities, not certainties. It could be she was of Latino or Native American descent, though the likelihood of European descent is stronger.

    Even a measure as precise as the lead isotopes in her teeth is open to divergent interpretations.

    "Let's say her house was painted with leaded paint from Europe. She would gather up the same signal in her teeth," Kamenov said. "That's why we cannot be 100 percent sure."

    Even if she was from Greece, "We don't have anything that could pinpoint that this victim was from here," said Tarpon Springs Police Capt. Jeffrey Young. He said police have scoured their records for reports of missing persons or crimes in the 1970s that might be connected to the unidentified woman, and have turned up nothing.

    Father Michael Eaccarino, dean of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Tarpon Springs, said that while tens of thousands attend the town's renowned Epiphany celebration on Jan. 6, most visitors are from the United States, not Greece, which has its own prominent celebrations.

    Asked whether he thought it likely someone would travel from Greece to Tarpon Springs for Epiphany, Eaccarino said, "I really can't picture it. But stranger things have happened."

    Stranger things have happened. A 41-year-old corpse was revived through modern forensics into a portrait of a living woman, down to the plaid pants she was wearing when she was strangled. A close look at her teeth pointed to a village on the Mediterranean Sea as the place where she grew up.

    Norris is optimistic that someone, somewhere in the Greek communities of Pinellas or Pasco, will know something about her, about what happened. As he says, anything's possible.

    Peter Jamison can be reached at pjamison@tampabay.com or (727) 445-4157. To write a letter to the editor, go to tampabay.com/letters.

    Clues emerge in cold case murder that may be tied to Tarpon Springs 06/30/12 [Last modified: Saturday, June 30, 2012 1:51pm]
    Photo reprints | Article reprints

    © 2017 Tampa Bay Times
     
  13. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://unsolved.com/archives/little-miss-“p”

    Little Miss “P”
    Authorities hope to identify a woman found strangled in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida.

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    CASE DETAILS

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    Flyers were sent around the country

    Lake Panasoffkee lies in the heart of the vast Florida wetlands. Crossing the lake’s eastern shore is Interstate 75, which connects Florida with the rest of the Southeast. On February 19, 1971, two teenagers were hiking along the Interstate, heading north from Tampa, when they noticed the outline of a human form in the shallow water. Authorities retrieved the badly decomposed body of a young woman. She appeared to have been strangled: a man’s size 36 belt was still wrapped around her throat.

    Investigators determined that the woman may have been in her late teens or early twenties. She had no identification and had been dead for approximately three weeks. They were unable to find the killer, nor determine the woman’s identity. No one came forward to claim the body. After six months, the young woman was laid to rest beneath a small metal marker that simply read, “Jane Doe - 1971”

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    Her body was exhumed for clues

    Ten years later, Jamie Adams became the Sheriff of Sumter County. He began to review the department’s unsolved cases, and was particularly disturbed by the murder of this young woman:

    “It bothered me that this young girl had never been identified. And being a daddy and a granddaddy, I just couldn’t accept the fact that somebody out there couldn’t come forward and let us know who this young girl was. It was something that I had to do and I just feel deeply that it’s a mission that I’ve got to accomplish.”

    A year after he took office, Sheriff Adams officially re-opened the case. He obtained a court order to have the body exhumed. Dr. William Maples, one of the nation’s foremost forensic anthropologists, was brought in to assist with the new investigation:

    “The re-examination of the remains, ordered by Sheriff Adams, gave us a piece of information that is crucial. Something that wouldn’t have been known had it not been for Sheriff Adams. And that was that she had orthopedic surgery to her right ankle. This was done by an orthopedic surgeon, who wound a tendon through holes drilled in the bones of the ankle. It is a Watson Jones, or modified Watson Jones technique. The family or the physician may remember this.”

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    She had orthopedic surgery on her right ankle

    Sheriff Adams next contacted Linda Galeener, a forensic artist renowned for her ability to create accurate composite drawings based on skeletal remains:

    “One of the first things we do is get photos of the skulls and it’s important for those to be to scale, the same size of the skull. We use the crime lab to do that. And they bring forth photos of a profile and facial front of the skull. Then an artist will sit down, and we’ll put either tissue paper or some type of matte acetate over it so we can still see the photograph, and draw over it. And we actually plot the tissue depth using charts. And you just mold that face until it comes to life on paper.”

    Next, Sheriff Adams asked Linda to create age regression drawings of how the victim might have appeared at the age of twelve and at the age of six. According to Jamie Adams, this technique had never before been used in law enforcement:

    “I needed something that would put her back in time, with the hopes that maybe a school teacher, a Sunday School teacher, even a classmate that had gone to school with her would say, ‘Well, she’s in the fifth grade or the first grade that we remember.’”

    Sheriff Adams has mailed flyers to more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies throughout the United States and Canada. He has contacted hundreds of hospitals, and followed up hundreds of leads. Still, the identity of Little Miss Panasoffkee remains a mystery.

    The young woman was 5’2” tall, weighed about 100 pounds and was approximately 20 years old. In addition to the “Watson Jones” surgical technique that had been performed on her ankle, the young woman had extensive dental work, including crowns, caps and fillings. The examination also revealed that she had given birth to at least one child. These clues suggest that the victim was well cared for and may have left a family behind.
     
  14. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    I-75 at Lake Panasoffkee Creek

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  15. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    The victim came to the United States within one to three months of her death. It has been determined that she was of Greek descent and could have arrived in the U.S. directly from there just prior to her death. It is also possible that she could have come from or been directly related to Greek residents of Lavrion, Greece, based on dental testing.


    Laurium or Lavrio or Lavrion is a town in southeastern part of Attica, Greece. It is the seat of the municipality of Lavreotiki.

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    The small boat harbor at Lavrion, Greece

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  16. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  17. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/13/s...is-provides-clues-in-a-florida-cold-case.html

    A Jane Doe Gets a Back Story


    By JAMES GORMANNOV. 12, 2012
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    CLUES Detective Darren Norris in Florida sought scientists’ help in a murder case. CreditGregg Matthews for The New York Times
    As cold cases go, this one was frozen. Forty-one years ago a young woman’s badly decomposed body was found floating under a highway overpass at the southern end of Lake Panasoffkee, in central Florida, about an hour and a half northeast of Tampa.

    There was no clue to her identity, but one clear sign of her fate. “A man’s belt was wrapped around her neck,” said Darren Norris, an investigator with the Sumter County Sheriff’s office who is now in charge of the case. (The original lead investigator was William O. Farmer, who is now sheriff.)

    She was pulled from the water on Feb. 19, 1971, and detectives spent thousands of hours in a futile effort to determine who she was and who might have killed her. She was buried as Jane Doe.

    But such cases are not easy to let go. A young woman’s life and body had been thrown away. Detectives could not help but think of the family somewhere who had lost a daughter. In 1986, the body was exhumed, for further investigation, which again led nowhere. What the detectives had to go on, based on forensic science at the time, was frustratingly sketchy: She was 17 to 24 years old, might have had children, and seemed to be white or Native American. It wasn’t enough, and as it turns out it was only partly correct.

    Early this year, Detective Norris brought the skeleton of the victim, who early on became known as Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee, to Erin Kimmerle, a forensic anthropologist who directs the Tampa Bay Cold Case Project at the University of South Florida.

    Dr. Kimmerle reconstructed the woman’s face and clothing, took shavings of her tooth enamel and bones, and recruited George Kamenov, a geochemist at the University of Florida in Gainesville, to analyze chemical traces in those shavings of lead, carbon and other elements that can give a surprisingly detailed history of diet and environment.

    This kind of study, called isotope analysis, is part of the tool kit of geologists, archaeologists and paleontologists, but has only recently been used in criminal cases.

    Last week Dr. Kamenov reported at a meeting of the Geological Society of America in Charlotte, N.C., on his work with Dr. Kimmerle and Detective Norris. His conclusions were startling.

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    IMAGING Dr. Erin Kimmerle, a forensic anthropologist at the University of South Florida, recently reconstructed the face of a woman murder victim found in Lake Panasoffkee, Fla., in 1971.CreditMelissa Lyttle for The New York Times
    The young woman was not Native American, he told the society. The best evidence suggested that she grew up in Greece and came to the United States less than a year before she was killed. (Tarpon Springs, north of Tampa, has a large Greek-American population.)

    The research, said Detective Norris, “turned the case upside down.” Based on the findings, he provided information for an article that was published Oct. 11 in The National Herald, an international Greek-language newspaper. It was accompanied by the new reconstructed image of the victim and her clothing.

    The case is still not closed. The woman’s identity has not been determined, and Detective Norris acknowledges that it is still a long shot.

    But he is confident that he is on the right track. “The best lead that has ever come in this case came because of the science,” he said — science that has changed remarkably in the decades since the body was found.

    Among the changes are better databases for skull measurements used to determine ancestry; 3-D identification software for processing measurements and aiding in producing reconstructions of a face; and isotope analysis. A forensic investigation can now involve scientists from an array of fields, including anthropology and chemistry.

    “We’re all working together,” said Ann H. Ross, who developed the software program “3D ID” and is professor of anthropology at North Carolina State University. “That’s where it has changed dramatically.”

    Isotope analysis is one of the newest tools. “It’s in its infancy now” in criminal cases, Dr. Ross said.

    One of the first times it was used in a criminal investigation was in the gruesome case of the torso of a young boy, who came to be called Adam, found in 2001 in the Thames River in England. Traces of strontium and other elements that accumulate in bones and other tissues led to Nigeria, and eventually to an area near Benin City. He was eventually identified, but no one has been charged with his murder.
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    The reason such an analysis can be done is that elements come in different versions, called isotopes, that vary by mass. Rocks and soil in different geographic locations have characteristic percentages of these isotopes, a kind of signature. Geologists have been documenting these signatures for years, creating geographic databases. Now, with mass spectrometers, a scientist can read the signature of an element like strontium from a small sample of rock, bone, hair or other material and match it to a location. In Adam’s case the strontium signature matched pre-Cambrian rock in Nigeria.

    Dr. Kimmerle, the Florida anthropologist, was working on human rights cases in Benin City, Nigeria, when she talked to the police chief about Adam. “That’s what inspired me,” she said. She now collects sample isotopes for all her cases.

    And that’s why she recruited Dr. Kamenov, a geochemist, to whom she sent tooth enamel and bone shavings from the remains of the murder victim.

    Lead in the victim’s tooth enamel was what led Dr. Kamenov to his first discovery — that she grew up in Europe. In the 1950s, both Europe and America used leaded gasoline, and so lead ended up in the air, the dirt, the food and the teeth of growing children. But the lead came from different sources, with different signatures.
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    ANALYSIS George Kamenov, a geochemist, studied tooth and bone shavings.CreditKelly Jordan for The New York Times
    European gasoline had lead from Australia, Dr. Kamenov said. “The whole of Europe was contaminated with this Australian lead,” he said. The young woman’s tooth enamel showed she had grown up in Europe.

    But where in Europe? For that, Dr. Kamenov looked at another element, oxygen, also incorporated in growing teeth. People living near the sea have more of the heavier oxygen isotopes: when seawater evaporates, the heavier molecules (hydrogen and oxygen) fall closer to the coastline. The victim’s tooth enamel showed heavier oxygen, which suggested she was from southern Europe.

    He also looked more closely at databases showing fine variations of lead isotope signatures in teeth and narrowed down her probable geographic origin to Greece, probably south of Athens. But, he cautioned in an e-mail that this is just “the most likely scenario based on all the data.” He put the probability at 60-70 percent that she was from Greece, but said there could be other locations in the region with a similar lead signature. A final piece of evidence came from carbon in her hair. Corn and wheat have different carbon signatures and Europeans have a more wheat-based diet than do Americans.

    In looking at samples from the growing root of the hair and the old tip, Dr. Kamenov found a change: “The last hair that grew showed heavier carbon isotopes.” The woman had moved to a corn-based diet during the time her hair was growing, less than a year. She was a recent arrival in the United States.

    And that discovery has given Detective Norris a slim edge in pursuing a very old, very cold case. People who knew the victim may well be dead now, so such a case is very hard to pursue. (Anyone with information may call the sheriff’s office at (888) 231-2168.) But, Detective Norris said, “the advantage is modern science comes along.”

    He has another purpose in publicizing the case, he says: the hope that knowledge of new forensic techniques will spread to other investigators.

    “This science exists,” he said. “You can use it. It’s a great tool.”

    A version of this article appears in print on November 13, 2012, on Page D1 of the New York edition with the headline: A Jane Doe Gets a Back Story. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe
     
  18. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://forensics.usf.edu/projects/coldcase/13/

    Tampa Bay Cold Case Project | CASE 13

    • Sumter County Sheriff’s Office
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    • On February 19, 1971, the body of a white female was discovered under the Lake Panasoffkee Bridge on I-75 in Sumter County, Florida. This female has remained unidentified ever since, but new scientific analyses have allowed detectives to obtain a new composite image of the female and her clothing hoping that the image and other new information may allow detectives to finally identify her.

    • “Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee” was buried in a Jane Doe grave in Oak Grove Cemetery in Wildwood. In 1986, she was exhumed for re-examination and was the subject of an Unsolved Mysteries episode. Detectives obtained her DNA profile that has been entered into national databases should a potential family member come forward.

    • In March 2012, Sumter County Sheriff’s detectives requested the Forensic Anthropology Laboratory in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida to conduct further analyses on the 41 year old remains after learning of the university’s involvement in other bay area cold cases. The USF Forensic Anthropology Laboratory re-examined the remains and generated a new composite image of the victim and that of her clothing worn at the time of her death. At that time, she was between 17 and 24 years of age, approximately 5’2”-5’5” tall, weighed about 110-120 pounds, and had dark colored hair and brown eyes. She was wearing plaid green pants, a matching solid green shirt, and a shawl with green and yellow print. She had a Baylor wrist watch on her left wrist, a yellow gold ring with clear stone on her left ring finger, and a small, thin yellow gold necklace.

    • The victim’s teeth were examined by the Geological Sciences Department at the University of Florida. The conclusion of the analysis determined that the victim is possibly of Greek descent and most likely had come to the United States ten to twelve months prior to her death. Further testing determined the victim’s teeth contained a high level of lead that may link the victim to the small town of Lavrion, which is located approximately 60 miles southeast of Athens, Greece. Lavrion is known for its high level of lead contamination associated with mining operations in the region.

    • If anyone has any information, please contact Detective Darren Norris at the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office at 352-569-1617 or by email at dnorris@sumtercountysheriff.org.
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  19. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-offer-clues-identity-1971-murder-victim.html

    The mystery of Little Miss Lake Panasoffkee: Incredible CSI techniques offer clues to identity of 1971 murder victim
    By DAILY MAIL REPORTER

    PUBLISHED: 21:48 EDT, 12 November 2012 | UPDATED: 22:43 EDT, 12 November 2012

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    She had also worn white gold wrist watch, with the insignia from Baylor University, on her left wrist, a yellow gold ring with a clear stone on her left ring finger and a small/thin gold necklace.
     
  20. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

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