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PA LOUIS MACKERLEY: Missing from Allentown, PA - 7 June 1984 - Age 7

Discussion in 'Missing 1980 to 1989' started by Akoya, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    upload_2017-11-29_15-57-8.jpeg



    On the day of his disappearance, a babysitter was watching Mackerley while his mother was undergoing surgery. The babysitter told police Mackerley came home from school and said he was going to walk two doors down to visit a neighbor's home. He never made it to the neighbor's house.

    He was last seen walking between Fourth Street and Gordon Street. Carmen Marco, who ran Marco's Doggie Shop at 429 Gordon Street, remembered that Mackerley spent 45 minutes in his shop that day before leaving and walking east on Gordon. His parents believe he was headed to 391 Chew Street, the home of an elderly woman he liked to visit. Marco, now deceased, told police that Mackerley had ducked in to avoid two boys who were chasing him. Police later found the boys they believed scared Mackerley, but they were cleared of any wrongdoing.

    After Mackerley was seen at Marco's Doggie Shop, there was another possible sighting. A witness reported seeing the boy at approximately 4:30 p.m., speaking with an unidentified man and woman in a park near Jordan Creek (one block from the child's home). This report has never been confirmed or denied. When he had not come in by 11:00 p.m. and he failed to answer their calls for him, his parents called the police.

    In January of that year, Mackerley told his parents, the school nurse and a psychologist that he had been molested by a couple named Frank and Elizabeth. The Allentown Police Department was notified and could not find evidence to warrant an investigation as Louis could not provide last names or locations. It is unknown whether this event or events happened and if they had anything to do with his disappearance or if they even existed.

    Mackerley was one of the first missing children featured on milk cartons, grocery bags and billboards. He was a first-grader at Central Elementary.


     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 7, 2019
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  2. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.findthemissing.org/en/cases/2908/257/

    NamUs MP # 2908
    Louis Mackerley
    [​IMG]
    Lehigh County, Pennsylvania
    7 year old white male

    Case Report - NamUs MP # 2908

    Case Information
    Status Missing
    First name Louis
    Middle name Anthony
    Last name Mackerley
    Nickname/Alias
    NCMEC number 601804
    Date last seen June 07, 1984 00:00
    Date entered 10/08/2009
    Age last seen 7 to 7 years old
    Age now 40 years old
    Race White
    Ethnicity
    Sex Male
    Height (inches) 48.0
    Weight (pounds) 44.0

    Circumstances
    City Allentown
    State Pennsylvania
    Zip code
    County Lehigh
    Circumstances
    Louis was last seen between Fourth and Gordon Streets, traveling between home and the home of a friend. When Louis was last seen, he was missing four front teeth. He was last seen wearing a maroon and white striped shirt, blue pants, pink socks, and brown shoes.

    Physical
    Hair color Blond/Strawberry
    Head hair
    Dark blonde hair

    Left eye color Blue
    Right eye color Blue

    Scars and marks
    Two odd-shaped, circular burn scars on the right side of his chest.

    Other distinctive
    physical characteristics
    He was missing his four front teeth at the time of is disappearance.

    Clothing
    A maroon and white-striped Doggie short sleeved shirt; blue pants with a red tag on the back
    Footwear
    pinkish socks; and brown shoes

    Accessories
    elastic belt with trim

    Dental
    Status: Dental information / charting is currently not available

    DNA
    Status: Sample submitted - Tests complete

    Fingerprint Information
    Status: Fingerprint information is currently not available

    Investigating Agency
    Title Detective
    First name Tom
    Last name Anderson
    Phone (610) 437-7721
    Website
    Case number 84-28883
    Date reported
    Jurisdiction County
    Agency Allentown Department of Public Safety
    Address 1
    Address 2
    City Allentown
    State Pennsylvania
    Zip code 18101
    Comments
    Alternate contact is Detective John Miller
     
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  4. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/244dmpa.html

    244DMPA - Louis Anthony Mackerley
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The image on the left was taken circa 1984. The two images on the right are age-progressed to 27 and 33 years.

    Name: Louis Anthony Mackerley
    Case Classification: Non-Family Abduction
    Missing Since: June 7, 1984
    Location Last Seen: Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

    Physical Description
    Date of Birth: February 15, 1977
    Age: 7 years old
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Height: 4'0"
    Weight: 44 lbs.
    Hair Color: Dark Blonde
    Eye Color: Blue
    Nickname/Alias: Unknown
    Distinguishing Marks/Features: Two odd-shaped, circular burn scars on the right side of his chest. He has a slow gait and often leans forward, holding his head down. Sometimes he stands with both hands on his hips. He needs twice-daily doses of Ritalin to control his hyperactivity. Without the medication, he may suffer from memory lapses.

    Identifiers
    Dentals: Not Available. He was missing four front teeth at the time of his disappearance.
    Fingerprints: Not Available
    DNA: Available

    Clothing & Personal Items
    Clothing: A maroon and white (or green)-striped Doggie short-sleeve shirt, blue pants with a red tag on the back, an elastic belt with trim and a small train belt buckle, pink socks and brown shoes.
    Jewelry: Unknown
    Additional Personal Items: Unknown

    Circumstances of Disappearance
    On the day of his disappearance, a babysitter was watching Mackerley while his mother was undergoing surgery. The babysitter told police Mackerley came home from school and said he was going to walk two doors down to visit a neighbor's home. He never made it to the neighbor's house.

    He was last seen walking between Fourth Street and Gordon Street. Carmen Marco, who ran Marco's Doggie Shop at 429 Gordon Street, remembered that Mackerley spent 45 minutes in his shop that day before leaving and walking east on Gordon. His parents believe he was headed to 391 Chew Street, the home of an elderly woman he liked to visit. Marco, now deceased, told police that Mackerley had ducked in to avoid two boys who were chasing him. Police later found the boys they believed scared Mackerley, but they were cleared of any wrongdoing.

    After Mackerley was seen at Marco's Doggie Shop, there was another possible sighting. A witness reported seeing the boy at approximately 4:30 p.m., speaking with an unidentified man and woman in a park near Jordan Creek (one block from the child's home). This report has never been confirmed or denied.

    When he had not come in by 11:00 p.m. and he failed to answer their calls for him, his parents called the police.

    In January of that year, Mackerley told his parents, the school nurse and a psychologist that he had been molested by a couple named Frank and Elizabeth. The Allentown Police Department was notified and could not find evidence to warrant an investigation as Louis could not provide last names or locations. It is unknown whether this event or events happened and if they had anything to do with his disappearance or if they even existed.

    Mackerley was one of the first missing children featured on milk cartons, grocery bags and billboards. He was a first-grader at Central Elementary.

    Investigating Agency(s)
    Agency Name: Allentown Department of Public Safety
    Agency Contact Person: Detective Tom Anderson
    Agency Contact Person: Detective John Miller
    Agency Phone Number: (610)-437-7721
    Agency E-Mail: N/A
    Agency Case Number: 84-28883

    NCIC Case Number: M-359760385
    NCMEC Case Number:601804
    NamUs Case Number: 2908

    Information Source(s)
    NamUs
    NCMEC
    Allentown Police Department
    Facebook
    WFMZ
    WebSleuths
    Missing Persons of America
    The Morning Call - 12/29/1984, 3/27/1985, 6/7/2004

    Admin Notes
    Added: Prior to 2011; Last Updated: 9/30/2017
     
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  5. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://bethlehem.thelehighvalleypre...ouis-mackerley-remains-missing-30-years-later

    [​IMG]

    Allentown's Louis Mackerley remains missing 30 years later
    Thursday, July 10, 2014 by The Press in Opinion


    The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children is again asking for the public's help to locate Louis Mackerley, who was 7 years old when he disappeared June 7, 1984, from Allentown.

    Louis was last seen between Fourth and Gordon streets, traveling between his home and the home of a friend.

    At that time, Louis was missing four front teeth. He was wearing a maroon and white striped shirt, blue pants, pink socks and brown shoes. His photos are shown when he disappeared and age-progressed 33 years.

    The public is urged to call 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) or Allentown Police Department's Missing Persons Unit at 610-437-7721 with any information concerning the disappearance or current whereabouts of Louis. Calls may be made anonymously.

    Louis' poster may be viewed at missingkids.com/poster/NCMC/601804/1# poster.
     
  8. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.oxygen.com/blogs/what-ha...isappeared-while-walking-to-a-neighbors-house

    What Happened To Louis Mackerley, Who Disappeared While Walking To A Neighbor's House?
    by Gina Tron
    August 22, 2017 • 11:01 AM ET

    He went missing in Allentown, Pennsyvalnia, in 1984, and was one of the first to be featured on a milk carton.

    Police say that the chances of finding a missing person are greatest during the first 48 hours after their disappearance. After that, their case starts to grow cold. Sometimes the missing person is presumed dead. At other times, theories develop that keep their loved ones guessing — and hoping. This is true of Maura Murray, who disappeared 13 years ago after emailing her college professors that she was taking time off due to a death in the family. Turns out, there was no death. Oxygen’s The Disappearance of Maura Murray,” premiering Sept. 23 at 8:15/7:15c, sheds light on unexplored leads.

    Louis Mackerley went missing in his hometown of Allentown, Pennsylvania on June 7, 1984. That day, he returned home from school and told his baby sitter he was going to visit a friend, two doors down. Louis, 7, never made it to his neighbor’s house. Police believe a group of neighborhood boys chased him until he ran into a nearby hot dog shop. He reportedly hid out in the shop for 45 minutes before leaving. The owner of the hot dog shop has since passed away.

    According to Missing Persons of America, Louis told his parents, his school nurse and a psychologist that he had been molested by a couple named Frank and Elizabeth. The police were called, but Louis was unable to provide the abusers’ last names or address.

    Louis was one of the first missing children featured on milk cartons. The case received national attention. Despite that, Louis’ brother Harold Mackerley has claimed that Allentown police did not take the report seriously enough. Instead, he feels they believed that someone in the family abducted the boy.

    "This destroyed my parents," he told WFMZ. "The cops, literally for, like, the first three years, were useless, before they finally said, 'Maybe somebody outside the family actually did do something,.’”

    Police, however, maintain that they have followed up on hundreds upon hundreds of leads. One such lead: that Louis was seen by a nearby creek with an unidentified man and woman.

    Louis' family still has hope that he will be found.

    If you have any information on Louis’ disappearance, please contact the Allentown Department of Public Safety, Missing Persons Unit, at 610-437-7721.
     
  9. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.wfmz.com/news/lehigh-val...still-open-for-missing-allentown-boy/20011398

    30 years later, search still open for missing Allentown boy
    Louis Mackerley was only 7 when he disappeared

    Posted:
    Jun 09, 2014 11:06 AM EDT

    ALLENTOWN, Pa. - This weekend marked exactly 30 years since a young boy's disappearance thrust Allentown into the national spotlight.

    The victim's family still holds out hope that he's alive, and is still upset with how police initially handled the case.

    Anniversaries are never easy for Harold Mackerley, especially the day his little brother vanished right off the street.

    "Every day, every day," he said. "Not a day that doesn't go by that I don't think about him."

    Louis Mackerley was only seven-years-old when he disappeared on June 7, 1984.

    His last confirmed sighting was near Fourth and Gordon streets in Allentown, inside the old Marco's hot dog shop. The owner, now deceased, told police the boy had ducked in for about 45 minutes to avoid two boys who were chasing him.

    A relative was watching Mackerley that day while his mother recovered from surgery. She told police that Mackerley was headed to a neighbor's home that he frequently visited.

    Joe Hanna, a former Allentown assistant police chief, spent seven years on the case as a detective.

    "It's a task left undone for me," said Hanna.

    The case made national headlines. Mackerley was one of the first missing children featured on milk cartons, grocery bags and billboards. His mother, Sheila, appeared on several national talk shows.

    In spite of the massive media attention, Harold Mackerley claims Allentown police did not take the report seriously at first, instead focusing on his family and dismissing the possibility of an abduction. Rumors circulated at the time of possible neglect in the home, but Harold vehemently denies those claims.

    Mackerley's parents passed several lie detector tests.

    "This destroyed my parents," he said.

    WFMZ's Rob Vaughn spoke to Sheila Mackerley in a 1980s interview.

    "We'll make it," she said. "How? I don't know."

    Harold Mackerley is still bitter about the way he said police treated his parents.

    "The cops, literally for, like, the first three years, were useless, before they finally said, 'Maybe somebody outside the family actually did do something,'" he said.

    Hanna insisted investigators worked overtime on the case, even bringing in the FBI early on and reopening the case in 1990 and in the 2000s.

    "We followed up on hundreds and hundreds of leads and talked to just a multitude of people," said Hanna.

    After Louis Mackerley was seen at Marco's hot dog shop that day, there was another possible sighting.

    A witness reported seeing the boy along Jordan Creek, along with an unidentified man and woman.

    Just six months earlier, Louis Mackerley reported that a couple molested him. Police could never identify a suspect.

    "He was told that if the cops found out that he was going to disappear," said Harold. "So the cops came down and started asking everybody a bunch of questions, and lo and behold, Louis disappeared."

    As the years tick by, there is still hope.

    "I will, I have, and I do and I'll continue to maintain that Louis Mackerley will be found someday," said Hanna.

    It's one thing police and the Mackerelys agree on.

    "We're still looking," said Harold. "We've never stopped."
     
  10. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    He was last seen walking between Fourth Street and Gordon Street. Carmen Marco, who ran Marco's Doggie Shop at 429 Gordon Street, remembered that Mackerley spent 45 minutes in his shop that day before leaving and walking east on Gordon.

    [​IMG]


    429 W Gordon St, Allentown, PA 18102
     
  11. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]

    Jordan Creek, Allentown, Pennsylvania

    [​IMG]

    upload_2017-11-29_16-54-50.jpeg

    [​IMG]

    Allentown officials say a group of homeless people living in a wooded area near Jordan Creek

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  13. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.mcall.com/news/police/mc-missing-childrens-day-lehigh-valley-20170525-story.html

    Missing children from the Lehigh Valley and beyond

    May 25, 2017

    Today is National Missing Children's Day.

    In 1983, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed May 25 as National Missing Children's Day, commemorated each year by the Department of Justice. According to the Department of Justice, the day is dedicated to encouraging parents, guardians, caregivers and others to make child safety a priority and is a reminder "to continue our efforts to reunite missing children with their families."

    The Lehigh Valley region is no stranger to missing children, including two of the area's oldest cold cases.

    Information for this article was researched at NamUs, the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System maintained by the Department of Justice, and the Doe Network, a non-profit-run web site that also warehouses information on missing persons and unidentified remains.

    Louis Mackerley — Louis was last seen June 7, 1984, walking in the area of Fourth and Gordon Streets in Allentown. He was walking from his home to the home of a nearby friend. At the time, Louis was missing four front teeth. He was wearing a maroon and white striped shirt, blue pants, pink socks, and brown shoes. Anyone with information is asked to call Allentown police at 610-437-7721.
     
  14. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t16742.htm


    http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/m/mackerley_louis.html

    Louis Anthony Mackerley

    Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance

    Missing Since: June 7, 1984 from Allentown, Pennsylvania
    Classification: Non-Family Abduction
    Date Of Birth: February 15, 1977
    Age: 7 years old
    Height and Weight: 4'0 - 4'1, 44 pounds
    Distinguishing Characteristics: Caucasian male. Blond/brown hair, blue eyes. Mackerley was missing four teeth at the time of his disappearance. He has two odd-shaped circular burn scars on the right side of his chest. Mackerley walks slowly and often leans forward as he does so. When he speaks, he puts his hands on his hips.
    Clothing/Jewelry Description: A short-sleeved green-striped or navy and white-striped shirt, long blue pants or jeans with a red tag on the rear pocket that reads "Doggie," an elastic belt with trim and a buckle shaped like a train, pink socks, and brown shoes.
    Medical Conditions: Mackerley has been diagnosed as hyperactive and must take twice-daily doses of Ritalin to control his condition. If he does not take the medicine, he may suffer from lapses of memory. Mackerley has a history of learning and emotional disabilities.


    Details of Disappearance

    Mackerley came home from school and told his babysitter that he was going to walk two doors from his family's house in the 300 block of Chew Street to play with friends during the afternoon of June 7, 1984 in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Witnesses observed Mackerley walking between Fourth Street and Gordon Street about a block from his second-floor apartment home in the 360 block of Chew Street, but what happened to him afterwards is unclear.
    The owner of Marco's Doggie Shop, a local hot dog stand, stated that Mackerley came in at 4:00 p.m. and spent approximately 45 minutes browsing around the store. Mackerley told the shop owner that he was in the store to avoid some teenaged boys who were chasing him. He left at 4:45 p.m. and walked east on Gordon Street that afternoon. His parents believe he may have been headed for the Chew Street home of an elderly woman he liked to visit. The two boys who were chasing Mackerley that day were later interviewed by law enforcement and are not thought to have been involved in his disappearance.

    Another witness claimed to have seen Mackerley talking to an unidentified man and woman in a park near Jordan Creek, approximately one block from his residence, at approximately 4:30 p.m. This area was about one block away from Mackerley's residence; the story was not confirmed, but it has not been ruled out as a possible scenario either. Mackerley has never been heard from again.

    Mackerley's parents did not report him missing until 11:10 p.m. that evening. His mother had been in the hospital undergoing surgery, and he was in the care of other relatives at the time of his disappearance. He liked to stay out late and usually did not return home until about 9:30 p.m. Once he left the house in the early morning hours and accidentally locked himself out; his parents installed a special lock on the door to prevent this event from occuring again. When Mackerley did not come home late in the evening of June 7 and did not answer parents' calls for him, they contacted police. An extensive search of the area turned up no clues to his whereabouts.

    Mackerley enjoyed playing near water, particularly near Jordan Creek and Lehigh River, at the time of his disappearance. Shortly before he vanished he mentioned that he would like to visit Dorney Park. No trace of him was found at any of those places. His parents took lie detector tests early on in the investigation and were ruled out as suspects in their son's disappearance. There were rumors that they had abused and/or neglected Mackerley, but the Social Services investigated and found the allegations to be without merit. Mackerley's parents have three other children, two boys and a girl; he is their second-oldest child.

    In January of 1984, Mackerley told his parents, his school's nurse, and a psychologist that he had been molested by a couple named Frank and Elizabeth. His accounts of the alleged incident differed; once he said he had been molested on the railroad tracks near Jordan Street and the Lehigh River and other times he said Frank and Elizabeth had driven him to an apartment in Allentown and molested him there before taking him back to his own neighborhood. There may have been more than one incident. Mackerley says the couple threatened to hurt him if he told anybody about what they had done. The Allentown police were notified but could not find enough evidence to warrant an investigation, as Mackerley could not provide any last names or addresses in his accounts. It is not known whether molestation(s), if they actually happened, have anything to do with Mackerley's disappearance six months later.

    In 1988, David Riggs, a self-proclaimed private investigator from New York who claimed to have founded an organization called Search Seven to look for Mackerley and other missing children, was arrested in West Virginia after he accosted five young boys and offered to pay them to pose wearing bikini underwear. None of the boys took him up on the offer. Riggs pleaded guilty to two counts of attempted child abduction and one count of sexual abuse in connection with the incidents and was sentenced to a year in prison. Investigators looked into the possibility that Riggs was involved in Mackerley's abduction, but they found no evidence indicating this and he was eventually ruled out as a suspect. He was at one time a doctoral candidate at Columbia University. He has previously served time in prison but not for child abuse-related crimes. Riggs does not have a private investigator's license in New York and the organization he had supposedly founded, Search Seven, is not registered as a non-profit corporation in that state.

    Eleven months after Mackerley disappeared, his family moved into the house in the 390 block of Chew Street that he liked to visit. The elderly female friend of Mackerley's who had lived there was moving to a retirement home and Mackerley's family wanted to be at a place he knew and might return to. He had often played at the residence and had dreamed of living there someday. Mackerley's parents were unable to make the mortgage payments for the home, in spite of contributions from community members who were moved by their plight. They filed for bankruptcy and moved to Effort, Pennsylvania in 1989. The Chew Street residence has been vacant since that time.

    Mackerley is described as friendly and talkative but a loner and a timid child who was afraid to sleep alone. He had a short attention span and had trouble writing and paying attention in school. Because of this, he was due to enter a class for learning-disabled students in the fall of 1984. Mackerley was born near Stanhope, New Jersey and moved to the Allentown area in June of 1983, a year before his disappearance. His case remains unsolved; he is believed to have been abducted by a non-family member. His parents believe he may be alive and not remember who he is. His case was re-opened in 2004, twenty years after his disappearance.

    Investigating Agency
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:
    Allentown Police Department
    610-437-7721



    Source Information
    The National Center For Missing and Exploited Children
    Child Protection Education Of America
    The Morning Call
    Yahoo! Groups: Investigatemystery
    Lancaster Online



    Charley Project Hom

    http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/m/mackerley_louis.html
     
  15. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t16742.htm

    ANOTHER BIRTHDAY TO PASS WITHOUT LOUIS
    by BOB WITTMAN, The Morning Call

    Little Louis Mackerley, the blond-haired, hyperactive 7-year-old who captured
    the community's attention when he vanished in daylight from his center city
    Allentown neighborhood in 1984, would be 18 on Wednesday.
    Investigators never determined what happed to the youngster, and no one can do
    anything more than speculate whether the birthday elevates the missing boy to
    manhood or is merely a footnote to a story about a person long dead.
    Through the years, Allentown police and FBI investigators followed hundreds of
    leads, some taking them to other states, others deep into the murky world of
    child sex networks, but all led to dead ends.
    "It was frustrating, to say the least," said District Justice Carl Balliet, a
    former Allentown detective who worked on the case. "It was one of those cases
    that every time you got a lead, you just ran into a dead end. You'd butt your
    head against the wall."
    There were conflicting stories about when and where Louis was last seen.
    Carmen Marco, who runs Marco's Doggie Shop at 429 Gordon St., remembered that
    Louis spent 45 minutes in his shop June 7, a Thursday, before dashing out around
    4:45 p.m. and walking east on Gordon. His parents believe he was headed to 391
    Chew St., the home of an elderly woman Louis liked to visit.
    But there was another report that he was seen about 4:30 p.m. that day talking
    to a man and woman in a park near Jordan Creek, about a block from his home.
    Whatever the case, Louis' parents, Harold and Sheila Mackerley, did not miss the
    child until later that evening. Hyperactive and full of energy, he usually
    stayed outside playing until 9:30 p.m.
    When he had not come in by 11 p.m. and he failed to answer their calls for him,
    the Mackerleys called the police.
    As the days drifted into months and then years, and investigators appeared no
    closer to solving the case, Louis became, literally, a poster child of the
    missing-children movement.
    Time and again, Louis' face -- his mop of bangs, mischievous smile and big round
    eyes --peered off the sides of milk cartons, down from billboards and up from
    the pages of newspapers. His picture appeared in The Morning Call several times,
    most recently just two Sundays ago as the featured missing child of the week
    submitted by the organization Children's Rights of Pennsylvania.
    Balliet said the publication of Louis' photograph almost always caused someone
    to call police with a sighting. Early in the case, police thought several times
    they had found him, but in each instance the little boy they stopped and
    questioned turned out to be someone else.
    Later, they tracked leads based on supposed sightings in states nationwide.
    Balliet traveled to West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, trying to run down
    leads. He remembered one caller was certain she saw Louis swimming every day at
    a beach in New Jersey.
    But the identity of the boys in the sightings always turned out to be someone
    other than Louis, and the leads always proved false.
    Thinking the case might have been sex-related, police even tracked down known
    child-sex offenders with connections to the area but could not link any of them
    to Louis' disappearance.
    "A lot of man-hours went into that case," said Balliet, who left the
    investigation when he retired to run for district justice in 1991. He said he
    still dwells on the case a lot.
    Balliet's successor in the investigation, Detective Sgt. Joseph Hanna, said the
    case remains active.
    "As far as we're concerned, our cases are always open," Hanna said. But he
    conceded that police have done practically everything they can do without good,
    fresh leads.
    "After this amount of time, as the days and the years go by, the leads become
    less and less," said the detective.
    Still, Hanna received several tips as recently as last year. He checked each of
    them, but like all the others, they led nowhere.
    Soon after Louis vanished, the rest of the Mackerley family -- Harold and Sheila
    and their three remaining children, Harold Jr., then 9; Sheila, then 3; and
    Edward, then 5 months --moved around the corner to 391 Gordon, where Louis'
    elderly friend had lived.
    The Mackerleys bought the house when she moved to an apartment in a senior
    citizen's building because they wanted to remain in a house Louis knew in case
    he returned.
    But the home purchase was not to be. The Mackerleys had trouble keeping up with
    the payments. An Allentown woman who had not previously been acquainted with the
    family undertook a community fund drive for the Mackerleys in 1987 and raised
    nearly $10,000 to help save their home.
    But the refinancing resulted in even higher payments, and the Mackerleys
    declared personal bankruptcy two years later to try to hang on to the house a
    little longer. They did, but Hanna said they moved to Effort in Monroe County a
    few years ago. Attempts to contact them were unsuccessful.
    Since they moved, the house at 391 Chew St. has been vacant.
    Every now and then, Hanna picks up the phone and calls across the street to the
    local FBI office and talks to Ed Carpino, the bureau agent now in charge of the
    Mackerley case, to share information and make sure they are doing everything
    there is to do. Calling Carpino is Hanna's way of double-checking himself.
    The case nags at Hanna, and he'd like to see it solved.
    "I think Louis is out there. It's just a matter of finding him," he said. "We're
    hopeful that one of these days we're going to find him."
     
  16. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t16742.htm

    LOUIS COULD STILL BE WITH ABDUCTOR, SAYS COUNSELOR
    by RON DEVLIN, The Morning Call

    The director of a New York center that counsels children abducted by strangers
    and returned to their families doubts that Louis Mackerley was sold to a ring of
    child pornographers, as David Riggs once theorized.
    ''I don't think there are organized groups kidnapping kids and shipping them
    back and forth,'' said Gary T. Hewitt, who heads The Center for Missing Children
    in a Rochester suburb. ''That happens very rarely.''
    Hewitt said pornographers don't need to kidnap children. They can get all the
    children they want on the streets of big cities, like New Yorkand Los Angeles,
    simply by paying them to pose.
    While he has no theory on what happened to the Mackerley boy, Hewitt said it is
    possible he is still with his abductor.
    Hewitt, a psychologist, said many of the children he has counseled were abducted
    by people with whom they had developed a somewhat friendly relationship. He said
    that once abducted, the child often forms a bond with the abductor.
    Typically, Hewitt said, abductors will tell the children that their parents are
    coming for them. When over a period of time the parents don't show up, the child
    thinks that the parents no longer want him or her.
    ''The child thinks, 'When are Daddy and Mommy coming for me?' '' said Hewitt.
    ''The child's anger begins to be directed toward the parents instead of the
    abductor.''
    Hewitt, who has worked with the Mackerleys and hundreds of other families of
    missing children, said the child adjusts within two or three weeks of abduction.
    He has worked with cases where abducted children have attended school for up to
    seven years under false names.
    Hewitt said abductors break children down psychologically by telling them they
    are no longer wanted by their parents. Then, abductors fill the emotional
    vacuum, telling the children they love them and care for them.
    ''The kids don't go home because they fear their parents will reject them and
    they will lose the love they think they have,'' the counselor said.
    Because statistics are not consistent, it is difficult to determine how many
    stranger-abducted children are eventually reunited with their families.
    Hewitt, who has counseled eight stranger-abducted children in the last four
    years, said 15 to 20 percent are reunited with parents.
    The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Washington has
    recorded 471 cases of children abducted by ''unknown persons'' since it opened
    four years ago. About 140 of the children have been returned to their families
    and 86 were found dead. The rest of the cases remain unsolved.
    By comparison, the center's files list the names of 9,386 runaways or abandoned
    children and 7,570 children abducted by a parent.
    Hewitt explained that abductors, who are often involved in some kind of illegal
    activity, teach children to fear the police, rather than see them as a way to
    get back home. The child is told that if the abductor is arrested and goes to
    jail, the child will go to jail, too.
    The abducted kids are so fearful that when they see their photos in newspapers,
    on shopping bags or milk cartons, they think the police are looking for them.
    ''The kids see their photos as wanted posters. They're afraid to go back home
    because that means punishment,'' said Hewitt. ''As time goes on, it gets harder
    and harder for the child to return home.''
     
  17. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t16742.htm

    http://www.officer.com/article/article.jsp...0&siteSection=1

    Pennsylvania Police Renew Investigation Of Two-Decade-Old Disappearance

    From the Morning Call (Allentown) 2004

    ALLENTOWN, Pa. (AP) -- Police have renewed efforts to trace a 7-year-old boy who stepped out of a hot dog stand near his family's apartment and vanished.

    No one has reported seeing Louis Mackerley since that day, 20 years ago on Monday.

    "We'll never close this case," said Allentown police Capt. Victor Markowitz, who assigned the disappearance to two new detectives in May. "Hopefully, this will generate some interest in the case again, and new leads."

    Louis' mother, Sheila Mackerley, 52, recently said she keeps hope alive, but grieves.

    "I don't fight back the tears anymore," she said after several ran down her cheek. "You keep hearing the saying that 'Time heals things,' but in this case, time just makes it worse. It's not getting better. It gets worse."

    Mackerley was in surgery when the boy disappeared. She said she awakened from anesthesia with a bad feeling, shouting, "Louis!"

    "I had a very eerie feeling," she said. "When I came home from the hospital, they told me he was missing."

    She and her husband, Harold, scoured the streets for the boy with the blue eyes, mop of blond hair and smile that was missing four teeth.

    Louis had told a baby sitter he was going to visit an elderly friend a few doors away. He ducked into the nearby hot dog shop after being taunted by neighborhood children, then left, a witness said.

    Mackerley, a manufacturing laborer, and his wife, a homemaker, appeared on television, invited reporters to their apartment and traveled to news conferences.

    Louis' photograph was one of the first to appear on milk cartons, shopping bags, menus and billboards labeled "Missing."

    Former Allentown detective Barry Giacobbe compiled manila folders detailing hundreds of tips, made exhaustive searches, and conducted lengthy interviews with Harold and Sheila Mackerley. Their alibis, and polygraph tests, checked out.

    "What really amazed me was that all of the people we talked to and all of the publicity, that there were no eyewitnesses to Louis Mackerley's disappearance," said Giacobbe, who was assisted by the FBI. "That's what led to the stranger-abduction theory. This was probably the only disappearance in Allentown that could be attributed, ultimately, to a stranger."

    The leads dwindled. The Mackerleys heard less and less from police, though attention revived on notable dates such as the fifth anniversary, when Louis would have been 12, and a sketch of what he would have looked like was drawn.

    "He certainly is not forgotten by any stretch of the imagination," said Capt. Joseph Hanna, who had the case for about seven years after Giacobbe. "I've always been of the mind-set that someday we're going to encounter an adult who just happens to be Louis Mackerley."

    The Mackerleys now live in rural Effort, Monroe County. For years they bought Matchbox cars and superhero figures for Louis, only to have them sit in a closet.

    When Louis would have been 18, his mother said it was too painful to see a framed picture of a little boy "who didn't need me anymore." The family packed Louis' photographs away with his mittens and yellowed "Missing" posters.

    "You sit and watch your mother cry for hours on end," said Harold Mackerley Jr., who was 9 when his brother disappeared. "You watch your father trying to hold it together and be strong for Mom. Mom doesn't want to live anymore because one of her children is missing, but she still has other kids she has to care for."

    Harold Mackerley Sr. still remains stoic. "Everybody deals with it in their own way," he said. "I don't really talk about it. I hold it in, and I do my own thinking."

    Sheila Mackerley has lost her liver and a kidney, and in 2001, she had a heart attack. Unable to work, she pieces together jigsaw puzzles and keeps a carton of cigarettes close by.

    "I won't let him be dead," she said, but she thinks if the case is ever solved, it will be Louis who finds his way home.

    "It's now time for Louis to find Louis," the mother said. "I think there's some spark in him. He's going to recognize something in him, and he's going to come home before anything else happens."
     
  18. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t16742.htm

    Morning Call, The (Allentown, PA)
    July 22, 2001

    Endless Grieving ** The case of the missing intern in Washington has magnified painful memories for families of others who have disappeared.

    Author: KEITH HERBERT Of The Morning Call

    Article Text:
    Sheila Mackerley has a bad heart. Avoiding stress is a priority in her life. But that has been impossible since June 7, 1984, the day her 7-year-old son, Louis, disappeared from his center city Allentown neighborhood.
    And these days, turning on the television can be painful. With the case of missing government intern Chandra Levy gobbling up media attention, reminders of her son's disappearance are everywhere, Sheila Mackerley said.
    "It does make you relive the whole thing over again," said Mackerley, 49, now a resident of Effort, Monroe County. "I have to leave the room."
    While cases like Levy's grab the spotlight, about 75,000 people a month are reported missing across the country. Approximately the same number of people are found each month.
    And then there are the cases that languish unresolved for years, including cases in the Lehigh Valley region. Without resolution, a missing person's relatives are doomed to endless grieving. Often their anger is directed at police, whom they perceive as having forgotten their missing loved one's case.
    "My son sits in a bottom drawer until [police] don't have anything to do," Mackerley said of his file.
    In such cases police say they can only wait for a tip or lead that will pierce a veil of mystery.
    Besides the Mackerley case, there is the case of Frances Kiefer, reported missing by her husband on March 22, 1994, to Fountain Hill police. A day later, Bethlehem police found her car near Saucon Park. Kiefer had been a recluse inside her Fountain Hill home for 18 months before her disappearance. Doctors said she had fibromyalgia syndrome, a condition characterized by muscle pain throughout the body, a sleep disorder and an inability to function.
    Kiefer was 44, 4-foot-10, weighed 85 pounds and had short, dark hair when she disappeared. State police at Bethlehem are investigating the Kiefer case, said Chuck Rohrbach, Fountain Hill police chief.
    In Springfield Township, Bucks County, Edward F. Fonder III of Kintnersville has been missing since Aug. 25, 1993. Police searched the area around Fonder's Winding Road home with help from volunteer firefighters and dogs. In the fall of 1993 state police used a helicopter to search for him.
    "Probably every week I think, "Where is he?"' said Springfield Police Chief Robert Bell. "It's been completely quiet. Every time we get a teletype of a found person that's unidentified, we compare the descriptions. Nothing ever matches."
    Fonder was 80, 5-foot-10, weighed 160 pounds and had green eyes, brown hair and a full, graying beard.
    Nationwide, the number of missing people in the National Crime Information Center database has been declining. As of July 1, there were 99,176 people listed as missing. About 55,000 are female. The database includes anyone reported missing under any circumstances. Runaways and children abducted by a noncustodial parent are included. The list also tallies those missing as the result of natural disasters such as floods or earthquakes.
    There were 106,500 names in NCIC on July 1, 2000, 7,324 more than this year, said Monte McKee, chief of the FBI's Investigative and Operational Assistance Unit based in West Virginia.
    "It has hovered right around 100,000 for a couple of years," McKee said.
    Runaways account for the majority of the missing persons listed in the NCIC. Each year, 900,000 new entries are made, and about the same amount come out of the database, which mostly represents runaways returning home.
    Sixteen-year-olds make up the largest group, by age, of missing people tracked by the FBI. They accounted for 14,466 of the 98,000 missing people as of May 1. The NCIC has 13,000 names of 15- and 17-year-old missing people and fewer than 10,000 who are 20-29, McKee said.
    In Allentown, there were 670 adults and juveniles reported missing in 2000. All but five of them were found. The five still missing are runaways, said Detective Capt. Joseph Stauffer of the Allentown Police Department.
    Louis Mackerley was a light-haired, hyperactive 7-year-old. He was 4-foot-4 and weighed about 44 pounds. He'd be 24 today. Louis spent about 45 minutes inside Marco's Doggie Shop at 429 Gordon St. on June 7, 1984, a Thursday. He dashed out about 4:45 p.m. and walked east on Gordon Street.
    Reports about where Louis was after that differ. Sheila and her husband, Harold, believe Louis was headed to 391 Chew St., the home of an elderly woman Louis liked to visit.
    But there was a report Louis was seen talking to a man and a woman in a park near Jordan Creek, about a block from his home at 387 Chew St.
    Now, 17 years later, Sheila Mackerley's heart is failing. She may need a transplant and wonders how much time she has left.
    "I'd like to see him before it goes altogether," she said. "Someday. It's coming. Hopes are still alive."
    Stauffer was a patrolman in 1984 and responded to the Mackerleys' initial call about Louis. Today he's head of Allentown's detective bureau and supervises the detectives working on the case.
    The Mackerley case has taken on a life of its own, with supposed sightings of Louis over the years, with eager detectives ending up disappointed after reported sightings turned into cases of mistaken identity. The false alarms have come from around the country, thanks to Louis' photo on shopping bags, milk cartons, billboards and in newspapers.
    A unusual development came in 1999. Police received information that someone was selling a shopping bag with Louis' photograph on eBay, an Internet auction site. Police tracked the seller to Maryland and followed up, but "it didn't develop anything that led to Louis," Stauffer said.
    Someone reported seeing Louis in Michigan this year, but it was another case of mistaken identity, Stauffer said.
    "When we get any kind of lead or new information, we follow up," Stauffer said.
    Police don't have a suspect in the Louis Mackerley disappearance. Both of his parents were given polygraph tests early in the investigation. Police don't believe Louis ran away. Abduction is the most probable scenario, Stauffer said.
    Sheila Mackerley said Louis still visits her in her dreams. Each time, his visits get longer and longer, she said.
    "That tells me he is coming home," she said.
     
  19. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t16742.htm

    Morning Call, The (Allentown, PA)
    June 7, 2004

    Still waiting ** Parents of Louis Mackerley, who disappeared 20 years ago today, say they will never give up hope that he'll come home.

    Author: Angela Pomponio Of The Morning Call

    Article Text:
    Something was wrong. Sheila
    Mackerley didn't know what it was, but the feeling was so strong, it jolted her out of the fog of anesthesia as she lay on an operating table at Allentown Hospital.
    "Louis!" she hollered.
    As doctors began to operate, Louis, her bouncy 7-year-old, told his baby sitter he was going to visit his elderly friend Helen a few doors down from the family's Allentown apartment in the 300 block of W. Chew Street. He ducked into a nearby hot dog shop for 45 minutes, seeking refuge from the taunts of neighborhood children, then left, a witness said.
    He was never seen again. That was 20 years ago today.
    "I had a very eerie feeling," Sheila Mackerley recently recalled. "When I came home from the hospital, they told me he was missing."
    Mackerley, recovering from surgery that ended her ability to bear children, scoured the streets with her husband, Harold, for the boy with moppy blond hair, blue eyes and a smile that disclosed four missing teeth.
    Louis, who was on the new drug Ritalin to control his rambunctious ways, often roamed the streets, chatting with passers-by.
    But it wasn't like Louis to miss dinner. Worried, the Mackerleys contacted police only to be told they'd have to wait 24 hours to file a missing person report, which was standard practice then.
    What no one knew was Louis was about to join the small cadre of children snatched by strangers, children like 6-year-old Etan Patz, who disappeared from a New York City street corner on his way to school in 1979, and 6-year-old Adam Walsh who was kidnapped and killed in 1981.
    Thanks to the Patz and Walsh cases, a new sense of urgency over missing children was emerging. Louis' photograph would eventually become one of the first in the nation to appear with the word "Missing" on milk cartons, shopping bags, menus and billboards.
    Harold Mackerley, a manufacturing laborer, and his wife, a homemaker, appeared on television news shows, invited reporters into their apartment and traveled to news conferences, one with the late U.S. Sen. John Heinz as he announced that supermarkets would soon post missing children's pictures.
    Yet, despite the unprecedented attention, Allentown police were never able to turn up a solid lead. Today, Louis would be 27. The Mackerleys are still waiting for him.
    "If there was anything good out of the whole thing, it's that they were starting to do all of that," Sheila Mackerley said of the effort that continues today to publicize missing children. "A lot of kids were found after Louis. You have joy for them that their terror is over, but at the same time, you want to jump up and say, "When is it my turn?"'
    Infamous cold case
    Mention Louis Mackerley to Allentown police, and either someone has worked on the case or knows someone who did.
    It's the department's infamous "cold case," the only stranger-abduction case posted with Louis' photograph on the city's Web site.
    "Wow, has it been 20 years?" former Allentown detective Barry Giacobbe asked when contacted last week in Florida where he makes his home.
    Giacobbe, who has sons of his own, spent countless hours on the Mackerley case, compiling dozens of manila folders that detail hundreds of tips, exhaustive searches in and along the Lehigh River and, of course, lengthy interviews with Harold and Sheila Mackerley. The couple's alibis check out, along with polygraph tests.
    Several months before Louis' disappearance, the couple took Louis to police when he mentioned being touched by a couple named Frank and Elizabeth.
    Investigators, however, were never able to confirm Louis' account or that the couple even existed.
    All Giacobbe had to work with was that Louis was last seen leaving Marco's hot dog shop near Fourth and Gordon streets, where he hid for 45 minutes after neighborhood boys chased him there.
    After that, no one seemed to know where he went, Giacobbe said. Police determined that the boys supposedly seen chasing Louis were not responsible for his disappearance.
    "What really amazed me was that all of the people we talked to and all of the publicity, that there were no eyewitnesses to Louis Mackerley's disappearance," said Giacobbe, who was assisted for a time by the FBI. "That's what led to the stranger-abduction theory. This was probably the only disappearance in Allentown that could be attributed, ultimately, to a stranger."
    Every once in a while, there were gut-wrenching moments in the investigation when Giacobbe and the Mackerleys thought, finally, Louis was coming home.
    Among about 1,000 sightings, a woman reported seeing a boy who looked like Louis at Budd Lake in New Jersey. Ironically, that boy, who also was taking Ritalin, turned out to be Louis' cousin. One year, Giacobbe and Sheila Mackerley went to Pottsville where a boy who resembled Louis showed up for school with questionable records.
    "We set it up so she was able to look at the boy in school," Giacobbe said. "She stared at him for a while. I know that was really devastating for her to think it may have been her son and then have to say it wasn't him."
    Slowly, though, the leads came to a trickle. The Mackerleys said they heard less and less from police, and their son seemed to slip from the memories of Allentown residents, only to be resurrected on notable anniversary dates such as Year 5, when he would have been 12, and a sketch of what he would have looked like was drawn.
    The family can't recall the last time they heard from investigators.
    To this day, the Mackerleys harbor anger that they were never allowed to see one boy who they claim was picked up by police four times because he looked so much like Louis.
    Although the Mackerleys were told by police that the boy wasn't Louis and the boy's father produced a birth certificate, they won't be convinced until they see for themselves.
    "When Louis turned 18, I contacted them," his mother said. "I said, "He's a man now. I'd like to meet with the boy.'
     
  20. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    continued

    Well, right after police went to the man's house and he showed them a birth certificate, he moved."
    Giacobbe and Capt. Joseph Hanna, who had the case for about seven years after Giacobbe, couldn't confirm that account shared by the Mackerleys.
    Hanna, however, thinks it's never too late to find Louis.
    "He certainly is not forgotten by any stretch of the imagination," Hanna said. "I've always been of the mindset that someday we're going to encounter an adult who just happens to be Louis Mackerley. I always had an optimistic stance since I took the case, and I continue to do so."
    "I don't fight tears anymore'
    Tucked away on a shelf in the Mackerleys' home in rural Effort, Monroe County, a framed and embroidered plaque reminds them: "Think Happy Thoughts."
    For the Mackerleys, each year it's getting harder to do it.
    The couple lost one home to foreclosure after Louis vanished. They spent several years buying Matchbox cars and superhero figures for Louis, only to have them sit in a closet. They became overprotective of their three other children -- Harold, Sheila and Eddie -- watching their every move.
    Louis' disappearance has left a deep void in his brothers and sister, too.
    Harold Jr., who was 9 when his brother vanished, still leaves a room when a kidnapping is depicted on television or in a movie.
    "It's the way they portray it. They show the family upset for five minutes, or someone is going out and just saving the kid. It ain't like that," said Harold Jr., who took karate lessons as a child, thinking he could fight Louis' abductor one day.
    "You sit and watch your mother cry for hours on end," he said. "You watch your father trying to hold it together and be strong for Mom. Mom doesn't want to live anymore because one of her children is missing, but she still has other kids she has to care for."
    Louis' kidnapping only compounded the medical and financial misfortunes that have followed the Mackerleys. Sheila Mackerley, now 52, lost her liver in 1999 and a kidney not long after that. In 2001, she suffered a heart attack that led to other cardiac problems that plague her today.
    Unable to work, she pieces together jigsaw puzzles on the coffee table and keeps a carton of cigarettes within arm's length. Daughter Sheila Mackerley, now 22, lives with her parents. She does the housework and gives her mother insulin shots.
    "I don't fight back the tears anymore," the elder Sheila Mackerley says after several have run down her cheek. "You keep hearing the saying that "Time heals things,' but in this case, time just makes it worse. It's not getting better. It gets worse."
    Harold Sr., who investigators said was a man of few words throughout the ordeal, has remained stoic in his grief.
    "Everybody deals with it in their own way," he said. "I don't really talk about it. I hold it in, and I do my own thinking."
    When Louis turned 18, his mother said it hurt too much to see a framed picture of a little boy on the wall, one "who didn't need me anymore."
    So, the family packed Louis' photographs away with the youngster's mittens and "Missing" posters, now yellowed with age.
    It didn't mean goodbye, though.
    "I won't let him be dead," his mother said. "My dreams say he's coming home, so I'll live with my dreams."
    Three weeks ago, Allentown police Capt. Victor Markowitz said he assigned the Louis Mackerley case to the fresh eyes of two new detectives. Also, a digitally enhanced portrait that ages Louis to 27 recently was posted on Internet sites about missing children.
    "We'll never close this case," Markowitz said of the renewed investigation. "Hopefully, this will generate some [public] interest in the case again and new leads."
    Sheila Mackerley, however, thinks if the case is ever solved, it will be Louis the man who finds Louis the little boy.
    "It's now time for Louis to find Louis," the mother said. "I think there's some spark in him. He's going to recognize something in him, and he's going to come home before anything else happens."
     

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