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NJ MARGARET FOX: Missing from Burlington, NJ - 24 June 1974 - Age 14

Discussion in 'Missing 1900 to 1979' started by Akoya, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2018
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  2. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.namus.gov/MissingPersons/Case#/6077/details

    [​IMG]

    Missing Person / NamUs #MP6077 Margaret Ellen Fox, Female, White / Caucasian

    Date of Last Contact June 24, 1974
    Missing From Burlington, New Jersey
    Missing Age 14 Years
    Current Age 58 Years

    Case Information

    Case Numbers
    NCMEC Number 959832

    Demographics
    Missing Age 14 Years
    Current Age 58 Years
    First Name Margaret
    Middle Name Ellen
    Last Name Fox
    Nickname/Alias--

    Sex Female
    Race / EthnicityWhite / Caucasian
    Height 5' 2" (62 Inches)
    Weight 105 lbs

    Circumstances
    Date of Last Contact June 24, 1974
    NamUs Case Created April 15, 2010

    Last Known Location Map
    Location Burlington, New Jersey 08016
    County Burlington County
    Circumstances of Disappearance Margaret was last seen getting off a bus on June 24, 1974. Margaret was last seen wearing jeans with a yellow patch on the knee, a blue blouse, a white and black checkered jacket, and brown sandals. She was also wearing a gold necklace with flowers and a blue stone and a gold charm bracelet with a blue stone.

    Physical Description
    Hair Color Brown
    Left Eye Color Blue
    Right Eye Color Blue
    Eye Description--
    Distinctive Physical Features
    No Information Entered


    Clothing and Accessories
    Accessories
    Glasses case with Huckleberry Hound design

    Clothing
    Maroon color flared jeans with yellow patch on knee, blue blouse, black & white checkered coat, 34 B bra

    Eyewear
    Gold wire frame glasses hexagon shape, with a broken off nose and temple piece.

    Footwear
    brown sandals with strap around heel

    Jewelry
    Gold charm bracelet with round blue stone, gold necklace with flowers & blue stone

    Investigating Agencies
    CASE OWNER
    Burlington City Police Department
    (609) 386-3300
    Mike Dalesio, Investigator
    --
    New Jersey State Police
    (609) 882-2000
    Stephen Urbanski

    Case Contributors
    NCMEC
    Brenda Galarza, NCMEC Administrator
    National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

    1 (800) 843-5678

    NCMEC
    Helen Felch, NCMEC Liaison
    National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

    1 (800) 843-5678
     
  3. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/1280dfnj.html

    The Doe Network:
    Case File 1280DFNJ


    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Left: Fox, circa 1974; Right: Age-Progressed to age 49 (circa 2009)

    Margaret Ellen Fox
    Missing since June 24, 1974 from Mount Holly, Burlington County, New Jersey.
    Classification: Endangered Missing

    Vital Statistics
      • Date Of Birth: February 4, 1960
      • Age at Time of Disappearance: 14 years old
      • Height and Weight at Time of Disappearance: 5'2" (157 cm); 105 lbs (48 kg)
      • Distinguishing Characteristics: White female. Blue eyes; brown hair. Fair complexion.
      • Clothing/Jewelry: She was last seen wearing jeans with a yellow patch on the knee, a blue blouse and brown sandals. Margaret was also wearing a white and black checkered jacket. She was wearing a gold necklace with flowers and a blue stone and a gold charm bracelet with a blue stone.
      • Other: DNA has been entered into CODIS
    Circumstances of Disappearance
    Fox was last seen getting off a bus on June 24, 1974 in Mt. Holly, NJ, to meet a man who had advertised for a baby sitter. The telephone number in the ad was traced to a Lumberton supermarket.
    A widely publicized confession from a suspect in 1976 turned out to be a hoax.

    Investigators
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:

    Burlington City Police Department
    609-386-3300


    Agency Case Number: 745503

    NCMEC #: NCMC959832

    NCIC Number: M-150060380
    Please refer to this number when contacting any agency with information regarding this case.

    Source Information:
    National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
    Burlington Times
    New Jersey State Police
     
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  6. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]


    Burlington
    New Jersey 08016
     
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  8. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    upload_2018-8-4_11-18-33.jpeg

    upload_2018-8-4_11-19-14.jpeg

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.nj.com/burlington/index...d_cold_case_involving_missing_teen_is_ge.html

    Retired cop launches investigation into teen's disappearance in 1970s

    Updated Jul 12, 2017; Posted Jul 12, 2017
    [​IMG]
    Police show photos of Margaret Fox in 1974 and an age-enhanced picture of what she might look like in 2017.(Burlington City Police Department)
    By Amanda Hoover

    ahoover@njadvancemedia.com,

    NJ Advance Media For NJ.com

    BURLINGTON CITY -- A retired police officer is re-examining decades-old evidence and looking for any new tips in the 43-year-old disappearance of a local teenager.

    Michael D'Alesio, a retired member of the Willingboro Township Police Department, has volunteered his time as an investigator in the cold case of Margaret Ellen Fox, who went missing in 1974 at the age of 14, according to the Burlington City Police Department.

    D'Alesio met with current and former members of the Burlington City Police Department Tuesday to discuss the case, and the importance of picking it up after so many years.

    "If this woman is alive, somewhere somehow this newscast will get to her, someone is going to see it," D'Alesio said, according to NBC 10.

    Fox had recently advertised her services as a babysitter in the summer of 1974, and planned to meet a man who called himself John Marshall in downtown Mount Holly for an interview, according to The Charley Project, a site that keeps listings of missing people.

    Marshall postponed meeting Fox several times, but eventually made an appointment with her for June 24. Fox boarded a bus that day as her younger sister watched, heading to meet the man.

    Several witnesses said they saw Fox near the bus station in Mount Holly that day, but she has not been spotted since.

    Past investigations brought some some initial promise of closure, but the case has languished as those leads, including a highly publicized but false confession, fell away. The number Marshall had given Fox was traced to a payphone in Lumberton, and while other parents reported a man had contacted their daughters with offers for hoax jobs, none were able to find him.

    Much has changed in the ways detectives investigate crimes over the past four decades. At the time of Fox's disappearance, agencies shared less information, and social media, cell phone tracking, and DNA evidence could lend no hand to investigators.

    D'Alesio and those involved likely will be working in those same parameters as they re-examine the old case, which has little physical evidence to launch it. Still, he told NBC he believes it's possible to close the case.

    Both of Fox's parents have died, investigators hope their investigation might bring some closure to Fox's living siblings.
     
  10. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/20170910/mysterious-disappearance-of-margaret-fox

    The mysterious disappearance of Margaret Fox
    [​IMG]
    By Lisa Ryan, staff writer
    Sep 10, 2017 at 12:01 AM Sep 10, 2017 at 6:00 AM

    What happened to Margaret Fox when she stepped off that bus in Mount Holly?

    BURLINGTON CITY — Margaret Fox got on a bus at High and Broad streets, excited by the prospects of her first baby-sitting job.

    Within hours the 14-year-old would be gone, leaving little trace and fewer clues in a mystery that has haunted authorities, her family, and the community that has never forgotten the little girl who boarded that bus on June 24, 1974, never to return home.

    Margaret's disappearance 43 years ago has weighed heavily on the minds of those who spent years investigating it, chasing down dead-end leads and possible suspects.

    Despite the decades that have passed, law enforcement is again looking into her case, hoping that another review of the evidence and a fresh set of eyes will provide answers that have eluded them for so long: What happened to Margaret Fox when she stepped off that bus in Mount Holly?

    "The terminology that's used is 'cold,' " said Michael Dalesio, a retired Willingboro Police Department detective who is volunteering his expertise to review Margaret's case in partnership with the Burlington City police. "It's never actually cold; it's just awaiting new leads."

    Dalesio has been spending hours every week searching for those leads, or the one break that could bring Margaret home.

    He entered the case in April after talking to city police Capt. John Fine. He was looking to make use of his police training, skills and experience after he retired, and Fine knew the Fox case needed some attention.

    Fine turned over two copier boxes full of materials, from original police reports to those obtained later from the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office and FBI. Dalesio got to work, reviewing the reports, taking notes, and writing questions that now guide him as he analyzes the case looking for clues.

    He sees himself as an observer and said the work is worth it, even though he acknowledged that he doesn't expect to find new information.

    "You just reanalyze the data and see if something jumps out at you," Dalesio said. "And you contact the authorities that were involved in the original case and see where it ended with them and why."

    The disappearance
    Joe Fox was the last person in his family to see his older sister alive. Then 11 years old, he walked her to the bus stop and watched her get on the bus.

    He remembered Margaret as a tomboy who held her own with him and their older brothers. They went sledding and ice skating in the winter, and spent summers in Seaside or in their backyard pool.

    Joe Fox said the family was close, but as a teenager Margaret, like so many girls her age, wanted to find her niche.

    "You know, she was struggling with four brothers and everything and trying to find her identity," he said at his home in Bordentown City. "And that's what she wanted, you know, was to go baby-sitting and make money so she could buy clothes and do stuff."

    Margaret, who had just graduated from eighth grade at St. Paul School in Burlington City, got the job after her cousin turned it down because it was out of town. Margaret was hired on June 19 by a man who called himself John Marshall.

    The man offered Margaret $40 a week, plus bus fare, to watch his 5-year-old son from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. She was to start on June 21. He would pick her up in his red Volkswagen at the bus stop at High and Mill streets in his hometown of Mount Holly. Either Marshall or his wife would bring her home by 2 or 2:30 p.m.

    But Margaret did not start her job on June 21. Marshall called the day before and spoke to her father, David, saying there was a death in the family. She would instead start a few days later, on a Monday morning.

    Joe Fox said his parents were always protective of their children, and when David Fox had the opportunity to speak with Marshall, he did what he could to get a read on the man.

    He paid attention when he spoke to Marshall one day when Margaret could not come to the phone, and he and his wife, Mary, asked their daughter to call them from Marshall's house that Monday morning to tell them she had arrived safely.

    "We guarded them, too closely maybe. She used to say we protected her too much," David Fox told the Burlington County Times in a 1975 story. "As I think back, it didn't seem like we did anything wrong in letting her go. It was daylight."

    And it was the 1970s — a time before real-life crime shows and news programs filled the television with cautionary tales, missing children's faces were on milk cartons, Amber alerts and online sex offender registries. Margaret didn't set out with a smartphone and a sense of danger.

    She took her bathing suit to swim in Marshall's pool and her Huckleberry Hound glasses case.

    Joe Fox said there was no concern when he walked his sister those few blocks from their home on Penn Street to the bus stop. When he watched her board the Transport of New Jersey's 8:40 a.m. bus, he could never have guessed what was to come, and he certainly didn't think she planned to leave home for good.

    "She was excited. There was definitely (not) even an inkling she was running away," he said. "It just wasn't what was happening."

    Margaret's parents became uneasy later in the morning, though.

    When she did not call home as instructed, David and Mary Fox tried to reach their daughter at the number Marshall had given. She did not answer. The number connected them not to Marshall's home, but to a pay phone outside the A&P grocery store on Route 38 in Lumberton.

    Later that afternoon, panic had set in, Joe Fox remembered. Margaret had left notes by the phone detailing not only information relevant to the job offer, but also a note saying that either Marshall or his wife would bring her home by 2 or 2:30.

    Within hours, David Fox and a friend from Eastampton's police force were in Mount Holly searching for Margaret. Neighbors wasted no time organizing their own search.

    Investigators established early on that Margaret did not appear to have run away, and retired Lt. Jack McBride still insists that she was too close with her parents to hurt them by cutting off contact.

    "I can't imagine what has happened to her ... a child her age ... we are heartbroken," David Fox said about a month after his daughter's disappearance, a time when he searched daily for his little girl, taking to busy corridors around Burlington County and its back roads handing out photos of Margaret and talking to strangers in search of answers.

    "This is a tough apple to swallow. She's a nice girl … really don't like to brag, but she is a wonderful person," he said.

    Joe Fox said his parents always believed Margaret would come home one day. But he admitted that the disappearance, and the lack of answers, left his parents "broken."

    "You know, my dad — I tell you, give him a lot of faith," he said. "He never gave up. He went to church every morning."

    David and Mary Fox died without knowing what happened to their daughter, but not for a lack of trying. Joe Fox said his father searched for Margaret for years on his own time.

    "I have a feeling that in my search she will break out and I will be there at the right time and place," the father said in August 1974.
     
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  11. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Continued:

    According to Dalesio, David Fox turned even the everyday task of getting from place to place into an opportunity to find Margaret.

    "He had pictures and posters on his car windows, looking for her," he said. "And everywhere he drove, he was always looking for his daughter."

    The investigation
    Burlington City police records show that David Fox filed a missing persons report as soon as he was able, shortly after midnight June 25.

    Leonard Burr, a retired city detective lieutenant, was called in early for his shift and was immediately assigned to Margaret's case.

    Burr still vividly remembers that day. He boarded the bus Margaret had taken and retraced her 20-minute ride, interviewing the five or six people who rode between Burlington City and Mount Holly.

    Two women remembered her, and said she exited the bus at her scheduled downtown stop at High and Mill streets.

    One woman sat behind Margaret, and told detectives that when her baby son pulled her long, dark brown hair, the girl turned around to smile and chat, according to police records.

    She described a petite girl with blue eyes and "many freckles."

    "Her eyes were like smiley eyes," the woman recalled. "Like someone that was happy."

    Records from the investigation also include an interview with the second witness from the bus. She reported seeing Margaret speaking with a man in his 20s who was in a red sports car.

    Dalesio said Margaret likely asked him whether he was John Marshall. That man was located, interviewed and eliminated as a suspect.

    That was the last time anyone saw Margaret Fox, according to police records.

    That first day, Burr canvassed downtown Mount Holly near the bus stop, showing Margaret's photo to about 200 people.

    "Finally, I called back to the station at the end of the day for a ride back home, and was involved in the case all the way up until I retired in 1988," he said recently. "I was very disappointed during that time that we were never able to bring closure to the family."

    Although Burr had talked to only two people, there likely were others who had seen Margaret, according to McBride, who said people with information don't always come forward, fearing inconvenience or trouble.

    "Yup, they could've seen her, and they know in the back of their mind if they call up and say to the police, 'I saw that girl,' then they're going to come over and talk to them and bah-bah-bah," he said. "They just don't want to be bothered, so they keep their mouths shut."

    The lack of eyewitnesses didn't stop police. They continued to canvass the area. They followed up on leads. They even met with a psychic four times, according to records.

    "You know, the psychic said like, 'We would read about this in the paper, we think she's buried in so-and-so place in this grassy knoll,' you know?" Burr said.

    "(I was) a little apprehensive. I wasn't really sure whether I wanted to get involved in something like that, and then I thought, 'You know, I've got nothing. What could it hurt?' "

    The FBI entered the search within days of the disappearance.

    FBI agent Burl Cloninger was assigned to the case on June 28, 1974, the day that an unknown caller contacted the Foxes and demanded $10,000 in exchange for Margaret's return.

    The call came the day after the case was first reported in the press. A letter with the same demand arrived at the family's home the day after the call.

    "$10,000 is a lot of bread," the letter read. "But your daughter's life is the buttered topping."

    The distraught parents wasted no time and withdrew the money from the bank, according to Dalesio's research. Directions on how to deliver the ransom never came, but another letter arrived two days later telling the family the deal was off.

    "$10,000 was a lot of bread," that one said. "But your daughter's life was the buttered topping."

    This final letter was signed as though written by terrorist organization the Symbionese Liberation Army. Dalesio said the SLA, infamous for robbing banks and kidnapping heiress Patty Hearst, was not active in New Jersey in June 1974.

    However, the group was in the headlines, as the Hearst kidnapping occurred just four months before Margaret's disappearance.

    The FBI never determined whether the ransoms were legitimate or cruel pranks. Either way, they never brought authorities closer to finding Margaret.

    Dalesio's research shows that the incident did provide investigators with latent fingerprints to test against those of military members, federal employees, and thousands of offenders whose prints were on file with the Burlington County Jail, Prosecutor's Office and Mount Holly police.
     
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  12. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Continued:

    But again, the evidence proved to be another dead end. No matches were found.

    As the investigation continued, Burlington City police interviewed all of the drivers of red Volkswagens they could find as well as all of the area's John Marshalls, some of whom became persons of interest.

    Their first person of interest was a John Marshall who worked at the A&P whose pay phone number was the one given by the man who hired Margaret.

    But McBride remains skeptical that the caller to the Fox home would give his real name, or tell the truth at all.

    "I'm trying to put myself in the mindset of the individual that did this," he said. "First of all, he's not going to say, 'I live in Mount Holly,' because automatically all the police would come and snoop around and — yeah, 'Meet me in Mount Holly, but I'm gonna take you somewheres else.' "

    Not everyone agrees. Burr, for instance, is conflicted when it comes to the A&P John Marshall.

    "I think there's just too much of a coincidence there. Yet this guy passed the polygraph," he said.

    In addition to undergoing polygraph testing, the A&P John Marshall had an alibi: He was working at the time of Margaret's disappearance. He and all his co-workers were quickly cleared of any involvement.

    Today, the accuracy of polygraph exams is still open to debate. In his opinion, Dalesio said the test results depend on the interpretation of the person giving it. But the polygraph was really the only technology available in 1974.

    "You didn't have DNA, you didn't have voice recognition, you didn't have some of the sciences that we do today to help you with this case," he said.

    Instead, law enforcement had intuition — their own or, in many cases, that of a polygraph examiner. Detectives had to be able to conduct an interview, detect deceit and investigate from there.

    In Margaret's case, the police also had tips.

    The Prosecutor's Office manned a hotline around the clock, telling the Burlington County Times on June 29, 1974, that authorities would not only investigate all leads, but also those who phoned them in.

    The Burlington Council 589 of the Knights of Columbus even tried to help, taking leads and donations for a fund to reward anyone with information leading to Margaret's whereabouts.

    The city police also received tips from concerned citizens and other law enforcement agencies.

    Men named John Marshall who were behaving strangely were a frequent subject of tips. Authorities also investigated odd responses to newspaper ads. They followed up on claims that Margaret was seen as far away as Chicago or Texas.

    "We just ran down every lead that came in, no matter how crazy it sounded," Burr said.

    According to Dalesio's research, Cloninger, now deceased, said in an FBI report filed six weeks after the disappearance on Aug. 8, 1974, that leads and persons of interest had run dry.

    Leads largely tapered off in the late 1970s.

    In all, the police developed, investigated and cleared 12 persons of interest.

    Authorities have also tested numerous unidentified remains against Margaret's DNA. None revealed a match. They tested national databases as late as last month, hoping for a hit.

    The progress
    Although the local police, Prosecutor's Office, New Jersey State Police and FBI all worked on Margaret's case in 1974, the process was very different than the cooperative and collaborative efforts that are commonplace today.

    These days, according to Fine, his department works pretty seamlessly with other agencies. Burr said that was not the case back in the 1970s, when agencies were more territorial because they wanted sole credit for the outcomes.

    "There was little or no sharing of information between agencies at that time," he said. "The only way you could get it was if you knew somebody or if you begged for it."

    It kept investigators from getting critical information they needed, Burr said, and Margaret's case may have suffered as a result.

    The Burlington City police, with Dalesio's help, is trying to undo some of that damage, trying to connect pieces of information and evidence and resolve unanswered questions.

    Although Dalesio is not the first person to compile different law enforcement agencies' files on the case, he is the first to do so in a decade or more. He is also the first person from outside the city force to take an in-depth look.

    To Fine, that makes a difference.

    "To bring in someone new, that's not from Burlington, that doesn't know the family, will have an unbiased opinion but can just look at the fact pattern…," he said. "Maybe that will help something, but there's nothing to lose here."

    Dalesio may have a different outlook or bring different theories and ideas to the table than those before him, and Fine said even just one change in the investigation could solve the case.

    It also brings attention to an old case, which has never been considered cold or closed, that the department cannot provide with its current caseload. While a detective's full-time commitment is not possible, authorities do chase down new leads and work every few months to check unidentified remains against Margaret's profile.

    "We haven't (organized and analyzed records) in 10-15 years," Fine said. "And I can't tax a detective who's working over 100 cases with that burden, which is going to take hours on end."

    When Dalesio volunteered, Fine finally had someone who could devote the time just to work analytically on the case, putting together a timeline and the fact patterns.

    Fine said the National Coalition for Missing and Exploited Children is also an asset, working diligently to bring opportunities for DNA testing to law enforcement's attention. Margaret's DNA is tested against those of unidentified persons with similar descriptions.

    Dalesio wants to talk with the state police and FBI, which still has important evidence such as Margaret's diaries and a recording of the ransom call. He has not yet spoken to any of Margaret's family, former classmates or friends.

    For Joe Fox, his big sister is never far from his thoughts. He's grateful that investigators continue to try to find answers, and he said that while growing up city officers often would contact his family with updates and answer their questions.

    They don't reach out as often these days, nor does he contact them. But he still wants to know what happened to his sister, definitively, not to seek revenge against a perpetrator, but rather for closure.

    He once believed, as his parents did, that Margaret would come back, but that has changed over the years. Four decades is a long time.

    "I think if she was going to, you know ... a cousin kind of felt her spirit and stuff like that," Fox said. "I think whoever did it is burning in hell, I truly believe that."

    Dalesio finds himself striving to remain optimistic instead of suspecting the worst.

    But he also acknowledged the darker implications of the fact that Margaret never re-established contact with her family, even online under an assumed name. She's never used her Social Security number or her date of birth. She never sent an unmarked postcard just to say that she was OK.

    "To remain an optimist, I want to believe she's alive and just put everything behind her, and just left her family and started a new life. And, you know, she's happy somewhere and she's thrived and succeeded," Dalesio said. "But the realist in me, the police officer in me, says she never left Mount Holly."
     
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  13. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/n...-disappeared-is-she-still-alive-20170811.html

    South Jersey teen left for a babysitting job 43 years ago and disappeared. Is she still alive?
    Updated:
    August 12, 2017 — 11:14 AM EDT

    [​IMG]

    She was 14 and alone when she was last seen, in her flowery blue blouse, stepping off a bus in downtown Mount Holly one late June day.

    Scrawled notes left behind at her home in neighboring Burlington City detailed her plans to meet up with a stranger in a red Volkswagen who would take her to his Mount Holly home to babysit his 5-year-old son.

    That was 43 years ago. Margaret Ellen Fox disappeared.

    Police and FBI agents have long believed Fox was murdered after her rendezvous with this mystery man, who was never located.

    But what really happened?

    A retired Willingboro police detective who is reviving the cold case has a different theory.

    “Is she alive? I hope so. Maybe she felt she wanted a new life,” Michael Dalesio suggested in a recent interview. “But how could she fall off the grid like that for so long?”

    In the hopes of solving Burlington County’s coldest missing-persons case, Dalesio is poring through two boxes of investigative files and is revealing intriguing details that previously were not disclosed. Among them is a confusing $10,000 ransom note sent to Fox’s parents that mysteriously mentioned the Symbionese Liberation Army. This was four months after Patty Hearst was abducted by the SLA.

    Then there were also Fox’s diaries, found in her bedroom, which included passages about being bullied in school, about snowballs being hurled at her, and about her wish to move to California or Florida to start a new life.

    Along the way, suspects came and went.

    In an NBC News 10 broadcast last month, Dalesio launched an appeal to the public. “Maybe somebody remembers something and has not come forward before,” he said.

    Already, he has received two tips that hint she may be living out of state. A rendering created by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children shows how she might look today, at age 57.

    Dalesio, 53, was looking for something to occupy his time and energy after he became disabled a few years ago when he and several officers were involved in a scuffle with a man who was being taken to a psychiatric facility. Dalesio’s right foot was crushed and he had to have his ankle replaced.

    “I felt my career was cut short,” he said, adding that he had been a police officer for 21 years, including 14 as a detective. He is doing this review as a volunteer.

    “This is a case that still claws at investigators,” Dalesio said. He said that she likely was killed, but there’s a possibility that she was not, and that needs to be explored.

    Dalesio said Fox’s parents have both died, but two of her brothers are alive. Neither could be reached for comment.

    More than 1,100 people are on New Jersey’s missing-persons list, dating to 1969, according to state police.

    Leonard Burr, a retired Burlington City detective who was the first officer sent to investigate when Fox went missing June 24, 1974, said it was his only case that he had not solved. “It hung with me for a long time,” said Burr, now 80. He interviewed the bus driver, passengers, and owners of the shops at the bus stop near the intersection of High and Mill. One passenger watched her get off, but no one else had any other information on Fox or the VW.

    “It was a very frustrating case, I could get nothing,” he said. “Whooosh, she just disappeared.”

    Burr suggested there was foul play, but said one of the new tips that recently came in said someone had seen a person who fits Fox’s description. “If that’s the case, then who knows? Maybe she just decided she liked her freedom and went off,” he said.

    Back then, Burr said, there was rivalry between the local police and the FBI, and the lack of cooperation could have hurt the investigation. “The goal now is to solve a case, not get credit,” he said.

    Dalesio began reviewing the Fox file in April, and in a recent interview chronicled the ins and outs of the case over the years and sprinkled in ideas of what could be analyzed further. “We need to close the case. There has to be an ending or a conclusion… Even if she just moved away, this brings hope to people to know they won’t be forgotten,” he said.

    Fox was in eighth grade at St. Paul’s Roman Catholic School in Burlington when she and a cousin, Lynn Parks, placed a classified ad in a local newspaper, with a phone number, seeking babysitting work. A man who identified himself as John Marshall responded. He told Parks he had a 5-year-old son, a backyard swimming pool, and a swing set at his Mount Holly home.

    Parks’ parents wouldn’t give her permission to go, so she gave Fox the man’s number and phone number. When Fox called him, he said he would pay her $40 to babysit the child for four hours a day, five days a week, and that he would meet her at the bus stop on June 24.

    Four days later, her parents received a phone call from a man who claimed he had the teenager and was seeking $10,000. A day later, a note arrived at the Fox home saying the money should be put in a box “with blue wrapping (same as Margaret’s blouse)… Margaret is alright. We only tore her blouse and broke her glasses. Follow the instructions …”

    Dalesio said the note could have been a hoax. Fingerprints were retrieved from the note by the FBI and he hopes to locate them and place them into a national database to see if they can find a match. Back then, the prints were only matched up against local collections, he said.

    The phone number that was noted on Fox’s notes with John Marshall’s name was traced to a phone booth at a former supermarket in Mount Holly where the manager was named Jack Marshall. But he had an alibi and a polygraph determined he was truthful.

    Four years later, a sex offender in Mount Holly came to the attention of the police and FBI. The suspect had owned a red Volkswagen at the time Fox went missing, and lived in Mount Holly not far from the bus stop. But he also had an alibi – he was a ham radio operator and a logbook he kept over the years showed he had been on the radio with someone at the time she got off the bus.

    Dalesio said he believes the case can still be solved. “We’re going to look at everything,” he said.

    Anyone with information on the case is asked to call the Burlington City Police tip line at 609-386-0262.

    Published: August 11, 2017 — 11:11 AM EDT | Updated: August 12, 2017 — 11:14 AM EDT
     
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  14. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/06/29/archives/fbi-enters-search-for-a-jersey-girl-14.html

    F.B.I. Enters Search For a Jersey Girl, 14
    JUNE 29, 1974

    BURLINGTON, N.J., June 28—The Federal Bureau of Investigation has begun an intensive inquiry into the unexplained disappearance of 14‐year‐old Margaret Fox, who left her home here last Monday to take a bus to her first baby‐sitting job.

    J. Wallace LoPrade, the special agent in charge of F.B.I. in New Jersey, reported today that at least 50 agents were searching the surrounding area for evidence of kidnapping or other violation of Federal statutes.

    According to the girl's father. David Fox, who has operated a plumbing and heating buiness here for 25 years, the girl climbed aboard the 8:42 A.M. bus to Lumberton about 10 miles away to sit for the 5‐year‐old child of a man who had answered her advertisement for baby‐sitting.

    When she had not returned fiome by midnight that night, Mr. Fox notified the Burlington police. No word of the girl has been received since, he said.

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  15. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://charleyproject.org/case/margaret-ellen-fox

    Margaret Ellen Fox

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Margaret, circa 1974; Age-progression to age 56 (circa 2016)

    • Missing Since06/24/1974
    • Missing FromBurlington, New Jersey
    • ClassificationEndangered Missing
    • Date of Birth02/04/1960 (58)
    • Age14 years old
    • Height and Weight5'2 - 5'3, 105 pounds
    • Clothing/Jewelry DescriptionA light blue long-sleeved floral-patterned blouse which was squared at the top and flared at the waist, a black and white or blue and white checkered waist-length jacket, a size 34B brassiere, maroon flared jeans with a yellow patch on one knee, brown sandals with a heel strap, a gold necklace with flowers and a blue stone on it and a gold charm bracelet with a round blue stone. Carrying a brown bag and an eyeglass case with the Huckleberry Hound design.
    • Distinguishing CharacteristicsCaucasian female. Brown hair, blue eyes. Margaret has freckles. At the time of her disappearance, two of her top front right teeth were missing. She wears eyeglasses with hexagonal lenses, gold wire frames and broken-off temple and nose pieces.
    Details of Disappearance
    Margaret was last seen in Burlington, New Jersey on June 24, 1974. She was planning to go to High and west Broad Streets in Mount Holly, New Jersey to have an interview with a man who called himself John Marshall.

    Margaret's younger sister accompanied her to the bus stop and saw her get on. Witnesses reported seeing her near Mill and High Streets after she got off the bus in Mount Holly, but she has never been heard from again.

    Margaret had advertised for a baby-sitting job, and "Marshall" responded to the ad on June 19. He told her he needed a babysitter for the following weekend, but he postponed meeting her several times.

    Finally he said he would meet her in a red Volkswagen. He gave Margaret a telephone number to reach him; the number was traced to a public phone booth at a supermarket in Lumberton, New Jersey.

    Margaret has never been heard from again and "Marshall" has never been identified. Several other parents in the area complained that someone had attempted to lure their daughters with fake job offers. A suspect's 1976 confession to involvement in her disappearance was widely publicized, but turned out to be a hoax.

    Margaret took piano lessons in 1974 and she liked to ride horses. She graduated from St. Paul's Grammar School in Burlington two weeks before she vanished. Her parents are now deceased, but her siblings are still alive, and some still live in the Burlington area. Her case remains unsolved.

    Investigating Agency
    • Burlington City Police Department 609-386-3300
    Source Information
     
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  16. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/new...rs-Willingboro-New-Jersey-Teen-433932123.html

    Retired NJ Officer Works to Solve Cold Case of Missing Teen
    Margaret Ellen Fox of Burlington, New Jersey was 14-years-old when she went missing on June 24, 1974.

    By David Chang and Cydney Long
    Published at 7:10 PM EDT on Jul 11, 2017

    upload_2018-8-4_11-37-41.jpeg

    A retired Burlington County police officer is working to solve the cold case of a teen girl who went missing 43 years ago.

    Margaret Ellen Fox of Burlington, New Jersey was 14-years-old when she advertised for a baby-sitting job in June of 1974. She received a response to the ad from a man who called himself John Marshall. The man told Fox he needed a babysitter for the following weekend but their meeting was delayed several times. Investigators say he finally told the teen he would meet her in a red Volkswagen Beetle and gave her a telephone number to reach him. That number was ultimately traced to a public phone booth at a supermarket in Lumberton, New Jersey.

    On June 24, 1974, Fox planned to go to High and west Broad streets in Mount Holly, New Jersey to have an interview with Marshall. She left a note at her home letting her parents know where she was going and then went to the bus stop with her sibling before going on the bus by herself. Witnesses also told investigators they saw her near Mill and High streets after she got off the bus in Mount Holly. She was never seen or heard from again.

    After Fox’s disappearance, several parents in the area reported someone had tried to lure their daughters to fake job offers. In 1976, a person confessed to being involved in Fox’s disappearance. Investigators later determined it was a hoax however.

    More than four decades later her case remains unsolved. Retired Willingboro officer Michael D’Alesio has launched a new investigation he’s conducting for free.

    “If this woman is alive, somewhere somehow this newscast will get to her, someone is going to see it,” D’Alesio said.

    D’Alesio spoke with Jack McBride and Leonard Burr, two retired Burlington City detectives who worked on the initial case.

    “I interviewed all the people that were on the bus and showed them pictures of her,” Burr said.

    Fox’s dental record went missing and the agencies involved in the initial investigation, including state and federal prosecutors, didn’t share information.

    “Back then you had, the FBI was a separate entity,” Burr said. “They didn’t cooperate with nobody.”

    Police are also working with no DNA and little physical evidence. Things that are common during modern investigations such as surveillance video, the Internet or social media, weren’t around in 1974.

    Fox’s parents are both deceased though her siblings are still alive. D’Alesio is hoping he can bring closure to her family.

    “Could it be solved?” D’Alesio asked. “Sure.”

    Fox is described as a white female with brown hair, blue eyes and freckles. At the time of her disappearance two of her top front right teeth were missing and she wore eyeglasses with hexagonal lenses, gold wire frames and broken-off temple and nose pierces. She also stood between 5-foot-2 and 5-foot-3 and weighed 105 pounds at the time of her disappearance.

    She was last seen wearing a light blue floral-patterned blouse squared at the top and flared at the waist, a black and white checkered waist-length jacket, a size 34B brassiere, maroon flared jeans with a yellow patch on one knee, brown sandals with a heel strap, a gold necklace with flowers and a blue stone on it and a gold charm bracelet with a round blue stone. She was also carrying an eyeglass case with a Huckleberry Hound design.

    If you have any information on the case, please call Burlington City Police at 609-386-3300.


     
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  17. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://s10.zetaboards.com/usedtobedoe/topic/995000/1/

    http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/...-433932123.html

    Retired NJ Officer Works to Solve Cold Case of Missing Teen
    Margaret Ellen Fox of Burlington, New Jersey was 14-years-old when she went missing on June 24, 1974.
    By David Chang and Cydney Long
    NBC10

    A retired Burlington County police officer is working to solve the cold case of a teen girl who went missing 43 years ago.

    Margaret Ellen Fox of Burlington, New Jersey was 14-years-old when she advertised for a baby-sitting job in June of 1974. She received a response to the ad from a man who called himself John Marshall. The man told Fox he needed a babysitter for the following weekend but their meeting was delayed several times. Investigators say he finally told the teen he would meet her in a red Volkswagen Beetle and gave her a telephone number to reach him. That number was ultimately traced to a public phone booth at a supermarket in Lumberton, New Jersey.

    On June 24, 1974, Fox planned to go to High and west Broad streets in Mount Holly, New Jersey to have an interview with Marshall. She left a note at her home letting her parents know where she was going and then went to the bus stop with her sibling before going on the bus by herself. Witnesses also told investigators they saw her near Mill and High streets after she got off the bus in Mount Holly. She was never seen or heard from again.

    After Fox’s disappearance, several parents in the area reported someone had tried to lure their daughters to fake job offers. In 1976, a person confessed to being involved in Fox’s disappearance. Investigators later determined it was a hoax however.

    More than four decades later her case remains unsolved. Retired Willingboro officer Michael D’Alesio has launched a new investigation he’s conducting for free.

    “If this woman is alive, somewhere somehow this newscast will get to her, someone is going to see it,” D’Alesio said.

    D’Alesio spoke with Jack McBride and Leonard Burr, two retired Burlington City detectives who worked on the initial case.

    “I interviewed all the people that were on the bus and showed them pictures of her,” Burr said.

    Fox’s dental record went missing and the agencies involved in the initial investigation, including state and federal prosecutors, didn’t share information.

    “Back then you had, the FBI was a separate entity,” Burr said. “They didn’t cooperate with nobody.”

    Police are also working with no DNA and little physical evidence. Things that are common during modern investigations such as surveillance video, the Internet or social media, weren’t around in 1974.

    Fox’s parents are both deceased though her siblings are still alive. D’Alesio is hoping he can bring closure to her family.

    “Could it be solved?” D’Alesio asked. “Sure.”

    Fox is described as a white female with brown hair, blue eyes and freckles. At the time of her disappearance two of her top front right teeth were missing and she wore eyeglasses with hexagonal lenses, gold wire frames and broken-off temple and nose pierces. She also stood between 5-foot-2 and 5-foot-3 and weighed 105 pounds at the time of her disappearance.

    She was last seen wearing a light blue floral-patterned blouse squared at the top and flared at the waist, a black and white checkered waist-length jacket, a size 34B brassiere, maroon flared jeans with a yellow patch on one knee, brown sandals with a heel strap, a gold necklace with flowers and a blue stone on it and a gold charm bracelet with a round blue stone. She was also carrying an eyeglass case with a Huckleberry Hound design.

    If you have any information on the case, please call Burlington City Police at 609-386-3300.

    Published at 7:10 PM EDT on Jul 11, 2017
     
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  18. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  19. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    upload_2018-8-4_11-48-15.jpeg
     
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  20. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://forensicgazette.com/forensic-news-of-the-day-e76279e7cc7a

    Forensic News of the Day
    A curated list of the top Forensic News for Wednesday July 12th, 2017.

    Retired Willingboro officer Michael D’Alesio has launched a free investigation into the 1974 cold case disappearance of 14-year-old Margaret Ellen Fox of Burlington, New Jersey. It is suspected that she was lured to a fake babysitting job offer by a man — calling himself John Marshall — shortly before disappearing.

    Retired NJ Officer Works to Solve Cold Case of Missing Teen
    A retired Burlington County police officer is working to solve the cold case of a teen girl who went missing 43 years…www.nbcphiladelphia.com
     
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