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MN NEW BRIGHTON JANE DOE: NF, 25-50, found at Long Lake Regional Park - 15 September 2000

Discussion in 'Unidentified 2000 to 2009' started by Akoya, May 15, 2017.

  1. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2017
    MULDER likes this.
  2. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Case Information
    Status Unidentified
    Case number 00-1411
    Date found September 15, 2000 00:00
    Date created February 09, 2009 15:38
    Date last modified February 22, 2017 08:26
    Investigating agency
    date QA reviewed June 21, 2011 14:19

    Local Contact (ME/C or Other)
    Agency Ramsey Cnty Med Examiners Ofc
    Phone 651-266-1700
    Case Manager
    Name Butch Huston
    Phone 651.266.1700

    Exclusions
    The following people have been ruled out as being this decedent:
    First Name Last Name Year of Birth State LKA
    Lauren Andersen 1961 Minnesota
    Carla Anderson 1964 Minnesota
    Linda Anger 1952 Minnesota
    Mindy Arnett 1981 Michigan
    Tamara Bradley 1963 Minnesota
    Lorraine Brock Unknown Ohio
    Laurie Feiner 1962 Minnesota
    Roseanna Forcum 1982 Minnesota
    Denise Fraley 1952 Iowa
    Jodi Huisentruit 1968 Iowa
    Deanna Joy 1973 Minnesota
    Cindy Larson 1970 Minnesota
    Penny Lease 1965 Illinois
    Dawn Mohn 1959 Wisconsin
    Nhi Nguyen 1952 Washington
    Victoria Owczynsky 1973 Minnesota
    Amy Pagnac 1977 Minnesota
    Cynthia Schmidt 1967 Minnesota
    Patricia Schmidt 1964 Virginia
    Patricia Schmidt 1964 Virginia
    Vicky Sundgaard 1963 Minnesota
    Susan Swedell 1968 Minnesota
    Nancy Tharp 1954 Minnesota
    Virginia Tobkin 1955 Minnesota
    Belinda VanLith 1957 Minnesota
    Amber Wilde Unknown Wisconsin
     
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  3. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://identifyus.org/en/cases/4808

    NamUs UP # 4808
    [​IMG]
    ME/C Case Number: 00-1411
    Ramsey County, Minnesota
    25 to 50 year old White Female

    Case Report - NamUs UP # 4808
    Case Information

    Status Unidentified
    Case number 00-1411
    Date found September 15, 2000 00:00
    Date created February 09, 2009 15:38
    Date last modified February 22, 2017 08:26
    Investigating agency
    date QA reviewed June 21, 2011 14:19

    Local Contact (ME/C or Other)
    Agency Ramsey Cnty Med Examiners Ofc
    Phone 651-266-1700
    Case Manager
    Name Butch Huston
    Phone 651.266.1700

    Demographics
    Estimated age Adult - Pre 50
    Minimum age 25 years
    Maximum age 50 years
    Race White
    Ethnicity Other
    Sex Female
    Weight (pounds) , Cannot Estimate
    Height (inches) 65, Estimated
    Body Parts Inventory (Check all that apply)
    All parts recovered

    Body conditions
    Not recognizable - Mummified
    Probable year of death to 2000
    Estimated postmortem interval Months

    Circumstances
    Location Found
    GPS coordinates
    Address 1
    Address 2
    City New Brighton
    State Minnesota
    Zip code 55112
    County Ramsey
    Circumstances
    Found at Long Lake Regional Park, New Brighton.

    Physical
    Hair color
    Head hair
    Her hair is brown to strawberry blonde to reddish and medium to long length

    Left eye color Unknown or Missing
    Right eye color Unknown or Missing

    Skeletal findings
    healed fracture of the right middle finger, osteoarthritis of the back and hips

    Clothing on body
    No clothing noted on the body.
    Clothing with body
    At the scene is a single white tennis type shoe

    Dental
    Status: Dental information / charting is available and entered

    DNA
    Status: Sample submitted - Tests complete
     
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  4. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
     
    MULDER likes this.
  5. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Recent FBI facial reconstruction performed in 2015
     
    MULDER likes this.
  6. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/270ufmn.html

    270UFMN - Unidentified Female

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Date of Discovery: September 15, 2000
    Location of Discovery: New Brighton, Ramsey County, Minnesota
    Estimated Date of Death: 45 days to six months prior
    State of Remains: Not recognizable - Mummified
    Cause of Death: Homicide

    Physical Description
    Estimated Age: 25-30 years old
    Race: White, possibly with Native American ancestry, as indicated by a dental examination.
    Gender: Female
    Height: 5'4" to 5'6"
    Weight: Unknown
    Hair Color: Brown to strawberry blonde/red of medium to long length.
    Eye Color: Unknown
    Distinguishing Marks/Features: Healed fracture to the right middle finger. Osteoarthritis of her back and hips.

    Identifiers
    Dentals: Available. Significant dental work completed including root canals on three teeth, and all four wisdom teeth having been removed. She also had an upper left tooth missing that would have been visible when she smiled.
    Fingerprints: Not Available
    DNA: Available

    Clothing & Personal Items
    Clothing: None located on the body. A single white tennis shoe was found at the scene.
    Jewelry: None
    Additional Personal Items: None

    Circumstances of Discovery
    Two people walking along a path in Long Lake Regional Park at 1500 Old Highway 8 NW discovered the victim's skeletal remains.

    Investigating Agency(s)
    Agency Name: Ramsey County Medical Examiner's Office
    Agency Contact Person: Butch Huston
    Agency Phone Number: 651-266-1700
    Agency E-Mail: butch.huston(at)co.ramsey.mn.us
    Agency Case Number: 00-1411

    Agency Name: New Brighton Department of Public Safety
    Agency Contact Person: Detective Michael Lochen
    Agency Phone Number: 651-288-4168 / Fax: 651-288-4110
    Agency E-Mail: crimeprevention(at)newbrightonmn.gov
    Agency Case Number: Unknown

    NCIC Case Number: U850001521
    NamUs Case Number: 4808

    Information Source(s)
    Namus
    New Brighton Department of Public Safety

    Admin Notes

    Added: Prior to 2011; Last Updated: 7/10/16

     
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  7. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://unidentified.wikia.com/wiki/Ramsey_County_Jane_Doe_(2000)

    Ramsey County Jane Doe (2000)


    Ramsey County Jane Doe was a woman found deceased in 2000.

    Ramsey County Jane Doe
    [​IMG]
    Sex
    Female
    Race White/Native American
    Location New Brighton, Minnesota
    Found September 15, 2000
    Unidentified for 16 years
    Postmortem interval 45 days - 6 months
    Body condition Mummified
    Age approximation 25 - 50
    Height approximation 5'4 - 5'6
    Weight approximation N/A
    Cause of death Presumed homicide
     
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  8. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t7166.htm

    http://www.twincities.com

    http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/14004731.htm

    5 years of work fail to yield even an ID

    BY EMILY GURNON
    Pioneer Press

    Detective Gary Sykes can rattle off the seven or eight murder cases
    he's dealt with in his 28 years with the New Brighton police.

    There was Kari Koskinen, the 33-year-old mother who disappeared from
    her apartment building in 1994 and was found dead a month later in
    North Oaks, apparently killed by her apartment manager. There was
    Diane Buntrock, murdered by her son Michael in 1995. There was the
    FBI snitch killed in 1986 by the criminals he betrayed, and Eleanor
    Stich, the 77-year-old woman beaten and left to die in 2002 by two
    men her husband allowed into her home to use the phone.

    But there is one case Sykes and his colleagues have not been able to
    close.

    On Sept. 15, 2000, two high school students taking a walk in Long
    Lake Regional Park came across a single tennis shoe, right in the
    middle of their path. The shoe was pointing toward Rush Lake, about
    20 to 25 feet to the north.

    Curious, the two made their way through the weeds and poplar trees at
    the edge of the lake. Then they saw the body, little more than bones
    by that point, in a tangle of cattails.

    "She had no clothing whatsoever, no jewelry on, no marks, scars,
    tattoos," Sykes said of the victim, whose gender was initially
    unclear. Actually, there wasn't much skin left to examine for marks,
    and internal organs were gone, due to extensive decomposition. There
    was no way to get a fingerprint or determine the color of her eyes.
    She had been dead anywhere from 45 days to six months, investigators
    learned.

    Not even the lone tennis shoe belonged to the victim, Sykes said.

    It wasn't much to go on.

    Because of the condition of the body, the coroner could not determine
    a cause of death, Sykes said. But there was evidence of "several
    sharp-force injuries, knife-stabbing wounds," he said.

    "Obviously, she's a victim of a homicide," Sykes said. "She wasn't
    out there wandering around the park naked by herself."

    Initially, police held back certain details from the public, such as
    the fact that one of the victim's top front teeth was missing. They
    thought they could find a match with one of the many missing persons
    reported in the region and didn't want to give away too much
    information for fear of compromising an investigation.

    But check after check proved futile. Dental records led police to
    quickly rule out the most highly publicized cases, such as the 1997
    disappearance of Toni Bachman of White Bear Township, who has never
    been found.

    In addition to publicizing a tip line, Sykes submitted all the
    information he had about his Jane Doe to the FBI's National Crime
    Information Center, which forwards him reports of other missing women
    as they come in.

    "They send me anything that's even close," Sykes said, thumbing
    through a box full of such notices, organized from A to Z. By now, he
    estimates he's examined 400 of them, some from as far away as Puerto
    Rico.

    But the influx has slowed. "I haven't gotten any for quite a while,"
    he said.

    Investigators made other attempts to find out who the victim was.

    The state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension gave forensic sculptor
    Marcia Cummings the job of reconstructing the dead woman's face,
    using her skull. New Brighton police sent out pictures of the result,
    to no avail.

    Anthropologists examined the remains, boiling all the bones and then
    putting them back together, Sykes said. They determined that the
    victim was white, around 5 feet 5 inches tall and somewhere between
    the ages of 25 and 50. She had light brown hair with some auburn in
    it.

    Sykes also sent the victim's information to the Doe Network, an
    Internet site that lists missing and unidentified persons.

    The woman's remains were finally buried a couple years ago, though
    her DNA is on file with the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

    Sykes may never know the story behind this tragedy. But he believes
    the victim was from somewhere nearby, and that one of two things
    happened to her.

    "She was either a drug addict or prostitute, and some guy did it to
    her, or a family member did it to her," he said. "And are either of
    them going to come forward and tell me they did it? No, they're not."

    Even if authorities find out who she was, and who likely killed her,
    the lack of physical evidence might doom any chance of a conviction,
    Sykes said.

    The detective keeps pictures of the victim's reconstructed face taped
    to a wall in his office. He occasionally fields calls from other
    police departments hoping to match one of their "lost" to
    Sykes' "found."

    But by now, some of the details have faded in the detective's mind,
    and frankly, he said, there's not much more he can do.

    "I keep her up there," he said, nodding at the wall. "I keep her in
    the back of my mind. Getting her ID'd " that would make me happy.
    Just finding out who she is."

    Emily Gurnon can be reached at egurnon@... or 651-228-
    5522.
     
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  9. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t7166.htm

    http://wcco.com/crime/new.brighton.body.2.1914123.html

    Sep 15, 2010 10:52 am US/Central

    Police Hope Reconstruction Will Help Solve Murder
    (WCCO)

    Police are hoping that a facial reconstruction will help solve a decade-old mystery of a woman who was found dead in New Brighton, Minn.

    On Sept. 15, 2000, a badly decomposed body was found in a swampy area of Long Lake Regional Park on 1500 Old Highway 8 Northwest.

    The woman was not clothed and police believe she was murdered, although a specific cause of death was not determined.

    Investigators haven't been able to identify the body in the 10 years since.

    An autopsy however determined that she is likely a white female around 35-45 years old. They think she had brown or reddish colored hair and was between 5'4" to 5'6" tall.

    The exam also showed a healed fracture to the right middle finger, osteoarthritis in her back, and dental work that includes three root canals and removal of four wisdom teeth.

    An upper left tooth was missing too. The medical examiner said it would have been visible when she smiled.

    To help visualize what the woman may have looked like, a facial reconstruction was done to show some of the characteristics. Police say it is not an exact likeness since the eye color and complexion aren't known.

    Anyone with information is asked to call the New Brighton Department of Public Safety at 651-288-4100, or leave an anonymous tip at 651-288-4137or online here.
     
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  10. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://z10.invisionfree.com/usedtobedoe/ar/t7166.htm

    http://www.newbrightonmn.gov/publicsafety

    http://kstp.com/news/stories/s1745164.shtml

    Investigators Reopen Decade Old Unsolved Case

    On the 10-year anniversary of when New Brighton Police found a badly decomposed body in Long Lake Regional Park, investigators are reopening the case, hoping to find new clues.

    Jennifer and Nathan Leach remember September 15th, 2000 when they stumbled across a decomposed body in a swampy area of Long Lake Regional Park at 1500 Old Highway 8 NW.

    Jennifer said she hoped it was a dead animal and couldn't believe it was an unclothed woman. She said every year on this day, since 2000, she and Nathan think about someone who has a mother, sister or friend that is missing.

    Investigators say they believe the victim, an unidentified woman approximately 35 to 45-years-old, died of homicidal violence.

    Investigators with the New Brighton Department of Public Safety now need your help to determine what happened in this 10-year-old unsolved case.

    Investigators created a facial reconstruction, which shows what the victim might have looked like.

    You can see from the picture that the victim is a white female and it's believed she had brown or reddish colored hair. Investigators say she had a left upper tooth missing that would have been visible when she smiled.

    If you have any information about this case, you're asked to call the New Brighton Department of Public Safety at: 651-288-4100.

    You can also leave an anonymous tip at: 651-288-4137 or online by clicking
     
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  11. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://justicefornativewomen.blogspot.com/2016/05/ramsey-county-jane-doe-discovered-in.html

    Justice for Native Women

    Ramsey County Jane Doe: Discovered in Minnesota in 2000.
    These are forensic reconstructions of the Ramsey County Jane Doe:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Jane Doe was mummified by the time she was discovered in New Brighton, Minnesota on September 15th, 2000. She was found by two people walking in a swampy area in Long Lake Regional Park at 1500 Old Highway 8 NW. Authorities have not released an official cause of death but she is believed to have been murdered. Jane was approximately 25-30 years old and 5'4 to 5'6 at the time of her death. Her weight could not be estimated due to the condition of her remains. She had brown to strawberry blonde hair and was missing an upper left tooth that would have been visible when she smiled. She had extensive dental work done. Only a single white tennis shoe was recovered from the scene, no other clothing or belongings were found.

    If you have any information regarding the identity or murder of the Ramsey County Jane Doe, you are encouraged to contact the Ramsey County Medical Examiner's Office at 651-266-1700.
    Tribal Information: Jane Doe is believed to be white with Native American ancestry. As she is unknown so are her people.

    Sources:

    NamUs
    Doe Network
    New Brighton Police Department
     
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  12. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.twincities.com/2010/09/15/new-brighton-police-renew-efforts-in-2000-jane-doe-death/

    New Brighton police renew efforts in 2000 Jane Doe death

    [​IMG]

    A reconstruction approximates the face of a woman whose body was found Sept. 15, 2000, in a swampy area of Long Lake Regional Park in New Brighton. Anthropologists say one of the woman s top front teeth was missing and the gap was visible when she smiled.
    By NANCY NGO | nngo@pioneerpress.com | Pioneer Press
    PUBLISHED: September 15, 2010 at 11:01 pm | UPDATED: November 12, 2015 at 6:56 am

    On the 10th anniversary of the discovery of a woman’s naked and decomposed body in a swampy area in New Brighton, police are reopening the unsolved case in hopes of finding out who she was and what happened to her.

    Investigators believe her death was a homicide. And they hope their two latest efforts — rereleasing a composite sketch Wednesday that could help identify the mystery woman, as well as using the latest DNA technology — will bring in new evidence.

    “We remain hopeful that one day we will get that tip that will pan out,” said Tony Paetznick, deputy director of the New Brighton Department of Public Safety. “It’s been frustrating not being able to identify her for so long.”

    Paetznick said DNA technology could provide new clues to the owner of a tennis shoe found near the woman on the day her body was discovered. Paetznick said the shoe did not belong to the woman. It appeared to have been recently placed there even though the woman had been dead for 45 days to six months.

    “The shoe has always been that piece of the puzzle,” Paetznick said. “It was almost like it was used as a marker … or it could have been just a coincidence.”

    On Sept. 15, 2000, two teenagers walking along a trail in Long Lake Regional Park came across a tennis shoe in the middle of the path. The shoe pointed toward Rush Lake, about 20 to 25 feet to the north.

    The high school students thought the placement of the shoe was odd, so they followed the direction it was pointing. After making their way through weeds and poplar trees, they made it to the edge of the lake, where they found the body wrapped in cattails.

    It took detectives time to find out more about the dead woman. Initially, the gender was unclear. The body had no clothing, jewelry, scars or tattoos.

    Because the body was badly decomposed, internal organs were gone. It also was impossible to fingerprint or determine eye color. Dental records did not identify the body.

    What authorities did know was there were signs of sharp-force injuries consistent with stab wounds on the body.

    A state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension forensic sculptor reconstructed the woman’s face, and a composite sketch was released.

    Anthropologists determined the victim was white, about 5 feet 4 inches to 5 feet 6 inches tall and was between 35 and 50 years old. Her hair was brown or reddish in color.

    She also had a healed fracture on her right middle finger and had osteoarthritis of the spine. The woman had significant dental work, including three root canals. All four wisdom teeth had been removed. Anthropologists were also able to determine one of her top front teeth was missing and the gap was visible when she smiled.

    Paetznick said the department has followed more than 400 tips and not being able to identify their Jane Doe for the past decade has been wearisome.

    Lead detective Gary Sykes keeps the composite sketch of the woman in his office as an everyday reminder.

    “It never leaves his mind,” Paetznick said.

    Nancy Ngo can be reached at 651-228-5172.

    Know This Woman?

    Anyone with information about the woman whose body was pulled from a New Brighton swamp 10 years ago is asked to call investigators at 651-288-1400. Anonymous tips can be left at 651-288-4137.

     
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  13. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2011/02/08/new-dna-science-could-help-solve-new-brighton-cold-case/



    By James Schugel, WCCO-TV

    NEW BRIGHTON (WCCO)
    — Ten years ago, a couple stumbled upon a woman’s body in a Twin Cities park. Despite a plethora of leads, police still can’t say who she was or who killed her. Now, a tiny clue just two centimeters long and crushed to near nothingness could help police finally crack a cold case.

    “A lot of work over a lot of years, and we’re really no closer now than we were back then,” said Detective Gary Sykes with the New Brighton Police Department.

    He remembers the 911 call that September 2000 afternoon. He investigated the case back then, and he’s still investigating it now.

    The woman was found dead, likely murdered, Sykes said, in Long Lake Regional Park near Rush Lake. She was in a swampy area and Sykes believes she might have been there up to five years.

    He’s compared her to some 350 missing women. He’s examined dental records and every other lead that’s come in. But now today, a decade later, he still doesn’t know who killed her. He doesn’t even know who she is.

    “That’s what the crime scene looked like,” he said, as he showed WCCO’s James Schugel pictures of the scene and the woman’s body. “There was virtually nothing left of her — other than skin and bones.”

    So decomposed, he’s got no fingerprints and very little physical evidence.

    “We both at the time said, ‘It’s a body! It’s a body! It’s a body!” recalled Jennifer Leach and her husband Nathan.

    The two were in high school that September day. Rollerblading through the park, they rolled up on a shoe still tightly tied and no one was around.

    “It seemed really odd. It didn’t add up to us,” said Nathan.

    They walked up a nearby deer path, and that’s when they found the woman’s body.

    They called 911, and New Brighton Police showed up and started their investigation. But the investigation, now a decade later, is at a dead end.

    “Any case where you can’t get to the conclusion that you want to get to is tough,” Detective Sykes.

    He’s now hopeful he might be able to solve the case with what’s called Familial DNA. The new science is giving Sykes new hope.

    At the Minnesota Bureau of Apprehension in St. Paul, forensic scientists have two ways they can find out who the woman is with her DNA. First, they could take her DNA and match it to someone in the public who comes forward claiming they could be a relative. They could also take her DNA and enter it into a national database of convicted criminals, hoping she’s a relative of one of them.

    “As more samples get added, every day a new search is done, so every day we get more matches, so, hopefully, one day we’ll get a match to all these missing persons,” said Jim Iverson with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

    Forensic scientists described the process of Familial DNA. They’ll take a bone or possibly a tooth from the woman, completely clean it and cut off a two centimeter piece of it. They’ll put that bone or tooth sample inside a freezer mill, which is filled with liquid nitrogen. The machine will pulverize it into a small amount, less than a gram, and from that, scientists can extract the woman’s DNA.

    Testing could take a few weeks or months. And it can’t come soon enough for everyone involved.

    “It would definitely be nice to see closure,” said Jennifer.

    Sykes hopes his plea is paid attention to. He needs help solving one of the hardest crimes he’s investigated in his 31-year career.

    “I think that there’s somebody who knows how she got there and what happened to her,” said Sykes. “She deserves better than what she’s got.”

    Police never found a murder weapon, but they think the woman might have been stabbed.

    Sykes may have one of her teeth tested, too.

    He urges anyone who might have known the woman or how she died to call the tip line and leave a message at 651-288-4137 or, during business hours, call 651-288-4100.
     
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  14. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Two people walking along a path in Long Lake Regional Park, 1500 Old Highway 8 NW, discovered the victim's skeletal remains.

    [​IMG]

    1500 Old Hwy 8 NW, New Brighton, MN 55112


     
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  16. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  17. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

  18. MULDER

    MULDER Bronze Member

    Thank-you for the thread Akoya for New Brighton Doe.
    The new reconstruction is very good.
    I hope this case gets some new leads.
     
    Akoya likes this.
  19. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member


    I hope they find the person responsible for her murder. There are just too many victims who are found in situations like this. I do hope this forum will help bring some of these UIDs home.
     
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  20. MULDER

    MULDER Bronze Member

    The area looks so isolated too - beautiful, but very lonely.

    There seemed to be a little hope in 2011 in the article you posted above:
    New DNA Science Could Help Solve New Brighton Cold Case
    http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2011/02/08/new-dna-science-could-help-solve-new-brighton-cold-case/

    At the Minnesota Bureau of Apprehension in St. Paul, forensic scientists have two ways they can find out who the woman is with her DNA. First, they could take her DNA and match it to someone in the public who comes forward claiming they could be a relative. They could also take her DNA and enter it into a national database of convicted criminals, hoping she’s a relative of one of them.

    “As more samples get added, every day a new search is done, so every day we get more matches, so, hopefully, one day we’ll get a match to all these missing persons,” said Jim Iverson with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

    Forensic scientists described the process of Familial DNA. They’ll take a bone or possibly a tooth from the woman, completely clean it and cut off a two centimeter piece of it. They’ll put that bone or tooth sample inside a freezer mill, which is filled with liquid nitrogen. The machine will pulverize it into a small amount, less than a gram, and from that, scientists can extract the woman’s DNA.

    -----

    but that was 6 years ago.
    I wonder if they ever did the testing?
    How sad to see that results (if they were done) did not yet lead to any more clues as to who she was and what happened to her.
     
    Akoya likes this.

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