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NJ ROSEMARY CALANDRIELLO: Missing from Atlantic Highlands, NJ - 25 August 1969 - Age 17

Discussion in 'Missing 1900 to 1979' started by Akoya, Jul 30, 2018.

  1. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]


    Rosemary Calandriello was last seen on August 25, 1969, around 18.00, as she left her family's Center Avenue residence to go to the store, located only two blocks away. Described as a bookish girl, very shy, Rosemary had just turned 17 and only recently had gone on her first date. She was the youngest of four children, the only one still living at home, and her life pretty much revolved around school, Scouts and her family. Her parents were strict and Rosemary wasn't allowed out at night unless she was chauffeured by her parents. When she hadn't returned later that night, her mother went to the police. Four high school boys, neighbors and classmates of Rosemary, claimed they had seen her riding through town with a stranger the night of her disappearance. They had spotted Rosemary riding in a beat-up white Ford Galaxy convertible. They didn't recognize the older guy at the wheel. Based on their recollections, a composite sketch of the man and a description of the car, was released to the newspapers. Two days before Rosemary's disappearance, and at about the same time of day, two young girls had been walking along Center Avenue in Leonardo when a stranger in a white Ford with a black rag top pulled up alongside them. The driver tried three times to pick the girls up, before they ran home and told one of their mothers about the incident. The mother then called the police and reported it. The daughter had memorized the car's license plate and had written it down. When investigators ran the plate number they found the car belonged to Robert Zarinsky.

    Robert Zarinsky, a former Linden grocer, was eventually convicted in Rosemary's death. For years after his conviction, Zarinsky insisted he'd never even met the teenager. He eventually admitted killing her "accidentally" by backing over her in his car. But he never told anyone what he did with her body.


    Media - https://crimewatchers.net/forum/ind...1969-from-atlantic-highlands-new-jersey.3961/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2018
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  2. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.namus.gov/MissingPersons/Case#/5909/details

    [​IMG]

    Missing Person / NamUs #MP5909 Rosemary K. Calandriello, Female, White / Caucasian

    Date of Last Contact August 25, 1969
    Missing From Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey
    Missing Age 17 Years
    Current Age 66 Years

    Case Information

    Case Numbers
    NCMEC Number 992796

    Demographics
    Missing Age 17 Years
    Current Age 66 Years
    First Name Rosemary
    Middle NameK.
    Last Name Calandriello
    Nickname/Alias--

    SexFemale
    Race / EthnicityWhite / Caucasian
    Height 5' 5" (65 Inches)
    Weight 122 lbs

    Circumstances
    Date of Last Contact August 25, 1969
    NamUs Case Created April 15, 2010

    Last Known Location Map
    Location Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey 07716
    County Monmouth County
    Circumstances of Disappearance Rosemary was last seen on August 25, 1969.

    Physical Description
    Hair Color Brown
    Head Hair Description pony tail
    Left Eye Color Brown
    Right Eye Color Brown
    Eye Description Rosemary wears glasses
    Distinctive Physical Features
    No Known Information

    Clothing and Accessories
    Clothing
    Yellow shorts, yellow/blue blouse

    Footwear
    brown sandals

    Investigating Agencies
    CASE OWNER
    Atlantic Highlands Police Department
    (732) 291-1212
    Thomas Stone, Detective
    --
    Case Contributors
    NCMEC
    Brenda Galarza, NCMEC Administrator
    National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

    1 (800) 843-5678

    NCMEC
    Helen Felch, NCMEC Liaison
    National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

    1 (800) 843-5678
     
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  3. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/2422dfnj.html

    The Doe Network:
    Case File 2422DFNJ

    [​IMG]

    Rosemary Calandriello
    Missing since August 25, 1969 from Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey
    Classification: Endangered Missing

    Vital Statistics

      • Age at Time of Disappearance: 17 years old
      • Height and Weight at Time of Disappearance: 5'7"; 120 lbs.
      • Distinguishing Characteristics: White female. Dark hair; dark eyes. Pageboy haircut, bushy, black eyebrows, and thick eyeglasses.
      • Clothing: Wearing yellow shorts and sleeveless shirt. Barefoot.

    Circumstances of Disappearance
    Rosemary Calandriello was last seen on August 25, 1969, around 18.00, as she left her family's Center Avenue residence to go to the store, located only two blocks away. Described as a bookish girl, very shy, Rosemary had just turned 17 and only recently had gone on her first date. She was the youngest of four children, the only one still living at home, and her life pretty much revolved around school, Scouts and her family. Her parents were strict and Rosemary wasn't allowed out at night unless she was chauffeured by her parents. When she hadn't returned later that night, her mother went to the police.
    Four high school boys, neighbors and classmates of Rosemary, claimed they had seen her riding through town with a stranger the night of her disappearance. They had spotted Rosemary riding in a beat-up white Ford Galaxy convertible. They didn't recognize the older guy at the wheel. Based on their recollections, a composite sketch of the man and a description of the car, was released to the newspapers.
    Two days before Rosemary's disappearance, and at about the same time of day, two young girls had been walking along Center Avenue in Leonardo when a stranger in a white Ford with a black rag top pulled up alongside them. The driver tried three times to pick the girls up, before they ran home and told one of their mothers about the incident. The mother then called the police and reported it. The daughter had memorized the car's license plate and had written it down. When investigators ran the plate number they found the car belonged to Robert Zarinsky.

    Robert Zarinsky, a former Linden grocer, was eventually convicted in Rosemary's death. For years after his conviction, Zarinsky insisted he'd never even met the teenager. He eventually admitted killing her "accidentally" by backing over her in his car. But he never told anyone what he did with her body.


    Investigators
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:

    Atlantic Highlands Police Department
    732-291-1212


    Source Information:
    NJ.com
     
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  5. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://unidentified.wikia.com/wiki/Rosemary_Calandriello

    Rosemary Calandriello

    Rosemary Calandriello was a teenager who went missing in 1969. Her case is classified as a homicide and has since been solved, despite that her body was never found.

    Case
    Robert Zarinsky was convicted of her murder in 1975 and maintained innocence until 1988, when he claimed he had accidentally run over her body with his car.

    He later bragged to an inmate that Rosemary's body would never be found, citing he had thrown it into the nearby ocean. Zarinsky was suspected to be a serial killer and died in 2008.

    Media appearances
    • Although not mentioned by name, her case was briefly detailed in Cold Case Files when a separate murder committed by Zarinsky was featured.


    Rosemary Calandriello

    [​IMG]


    Age 17
    Race White
    Sex Female
    Location Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey
    Disappeared August 25, 1969
    Missing for 48 years
    Height 5'5 - 5'7
    Weight 120 pounds
    Classification Presumed homicide
     
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  6. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://blog.nj.com/deadlysecrets/2007/08/chapter_four_enter_the_detecti.html

    Chapter Four: Enter the Detective
    Updated March 11, 2014 at 1:26 PM; Posted August 26, 2007 at 12:02 AM

    By Star-Ledger Staff

    By Robin Gaby Fisher and Judith Lucas

    [​IMG]Rosemary Calandriello

    The church bells were ringing. People in the Bayshore town of Atlantic Highlands set their clocks by the bells of St. Agnes Church, and for the Calandriello family of Center Avenue, the tolling of 6 o'clock meant dinnertime.

    The jug of milk in the refrigerator was almost empty. It was a summer Monday evening, Aug. 25, 1969.

    "Momma, I'm going to get the milk now," Rosemary Calandriello said, taking two of the dozen one-dollar bills her mother had left out for the insurance man.

    "Milk, and ice pops. Momma, please?"

    "Yes, yes," Agnes Calandriello said, shooing her only daughter toward the front door. "Hurry now, Rosemary. If you don't get back soon you'll be sorry. Your daddy doesn't feel good, and I don't want him worrying about you."

    Rosemary was a bookish girl with a pageboy haircut, bushy, black eyebrows, and thick eyeglasses. Excruciatingly shy, she had just turned 17 and only recently had gone on her first date. She was the youngest of four children, the only one still living at home, and her life pretty much revolved around school, Scouts and her family.

    Her parents were strict and, some thought, smothering. They were keenly aware of what Rosemary did and where she was at all times, but they had little to worry about. She was still more like a child than a teen -- she was still afraid of the dark.

    Rosemary headed out the door in her bare feet. The store was only two blocks away. "Don't worry, Momma," she called over her shoulder. "The ice pops will melt. I'll be right back."

    Tucking the money into the back pocket of her corn-colored shorts, Rosemary walked through the front gate and turned right on Center Avenue, toward the grocery store and the ice cream shop. Her mother turned back to a simmering pot on the stove.

    Five minutes passed. Then 10. The trip to town shouldn't have taken any longer than that. Agnes Calandriello walked out to the sidewalk and looked down Center Avenue. No Rosemary.

    After 20 minutes, her husband woke from his nap. Dinner was drying out. "Where's Rosemary?" he asked.

    "Rosemary should have been home by now," she said.

    'IF ONLY . . .'

    Sgt. Sam Guzzi had just begun his shift when Rosemary's mother walked into police headquarters.

    Darkness was falling, but the late-summer air was scorching and Guzzi noticed the woman's dark hair was damp and stuck to the back of her neck.

    "My daughter is missing," she said.

    The late 1960s were a time of relaxed attitudes, when teens were demanding and getting more freedom. Not Rosemary, Agnes Calandriello explained, one word running into the next. Rosemary never challenged the rules. She never even questioned them. She wasn't allowed out at night unless she was chauffeured by her parents. Indeed, she wasn't allowed out during the day unless there was a good reason.

    There was no chance Rosemary had met up with friends and lost track of time, her mother insisted. No chance she would go somewhere without asking her parents' permission.

    Agnes Calandriello was a nervous woman by nature, and a homebody. Her husband was sickly and had taken leave from his job at the post office. They rarely left the house, not even to run errands downtown. After their sons left home, it had become their daughter's responsibility to do the grocery shopping and pay the household bills. She was happy to oblige.

    Just that morning, Rosemary had walked to town to pay the water bill. She had brought home the receipt and $10 in change to her mother.

    "If only I would have known we were out of milk then," Agnes Calandriello told Guzzi. "If I had known then, she wouldn't have gone out the second time.

    "But we didn't know we were out of milk."

    Guzzi had an easygoing way about him, but when it came to his work, he was known to be relentless and thorough. He had grown up in Atlantic Highlands and put in 15 years on the police force. He knew a little about everyone, including the Calandriellos. Agnes Calandriello's characterization of her daughter rang true.

    He wanted to reassure her, wanted to comfort her, but how? Guzzi sent her home to wait with her husband by the phone. Maybe Rosemary would call, he said. If she did, she would want her mother to be there.

    But in his gut, Guzzi knew Rosemary wouldn't call.

    Picking up the telephone, Guzzi dialed the county dispatcher. A teenager was missing, he explained. Send an all-points bulletin to police departments around the state. Pronto.

    Minutes later, the teletype machine began to clatter. Guzzi watched, riveted to each letter: "Missing Girl . . . Last seen Center Ave. in Atlantic Highlands around 6 p.m. . . . 17 years old. 5-feet-7. 120 pounds. Dark hair. Dark eyes. Glasses. Wearing yellow shorts and sleeveless shirt. Barefoot."

    Guzzi reached for the bulletin as it scrolled out of the machine. The first thing people noticed about him were his hands. They were the size of dinner plates. He ripped the paper from the machine and read the message again, this time focusing on one thing: A girl planning to run away would not leave home without her shoes.

    THE LEAD

    Atlantic Highlands was like every small town when it came to gossip. By morning, people all over the borough knew a girl was missing, and everyone was speculating about her disappearance. Was she a runaway? Had something terrible happened?

    Guzzi, a fitful sleeper even on peaceful nights, had hardly dozed off and was back at headquarters before sunrise. As the only officer assigned to the case, he had his work cut out for him.

    The Atlantic Highlands police department in 1969 consisted of a single room in an old grocery store with a teletype, a typewriter and a rotary telephone. One end of the building was partitioned off and used as a municipal court. A holding cell was located at the other end.

    Everyone on the 14-man force, from the chief to the patrolmen, shared a single, gray metal desk, each officer contributing his own coffee stains and ink smudges to the scratched surface. Most of the open cases were petty crimes -- bicycle thefts and bad checks -- and most were assigned to Guzzi, the primary detective.
     
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  7. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Continued:


    Sitting down at the desk, Guzzi pushed the other files aside and opened the one marked "Rosemary Calandriello."

    Before he could grab his second cup of coffee, he had a lead. Four high school boys, neighbors and classmates of Rosemary, claimed they had seen her riding through town with a stranger the night before.

    Michael Hazeltine lived next door to the Calandriellos. He was driving down Center Avenue with three of his buddies, he said, when he spotted Rosemary riding in a beat-up white Ford Galaxy convertible. He didn't recognize the older guy at the wheel.

    Hazeltine and the other boys talked about how strange it was to see timid little Rosemary with the stranger. In the nine years Hazeltine had known her, he had never even heard of Rosemary having a boyfriend. And she wouldn't get in his car unless she was with his sister.

    When the convertible turned in front of him, Hazeltine followed. It was late summer, and he and his friends were just out for a drive. They had nothing better to do.

    It looked to Hazeltine like the man behind the wheel was talking to Rosemary. He kept turning toward her. She was seated with her back against the passenger door. She held her eyeglasses in her left hand, which was resting on the back of the front seat. Hazeltine couldn't tell if Rosemary was talking back.

    Hazeltine kept pace for three blocks. Then the convertible turned left. Hazeltine turned right, toward a friend's house.

    Guzzi took written statements from the boys. Based on their recollections, he released a composite sketch of the man and a description of the car to the newspapers.

    MATCHING DESCRIPTION

    Barbara Hardie of Leonardo picked up her copy of the Red Bank Daily Register. She got a sick feeling as she read the item about the missing girl:

    "Police today were still looking for Rosemary Calandriello, 17, of 93 Center Ave., Atlantic Highlands, missing since Monday night when she was last seen in a white convertible driven by the man at right."

    Two days before Rosemary's disappearance, and at about the same time of day, Hardie's 12-year-old daughter, Lydia, and a friend, Robin Spangenberg, had been walking along Center Avenue in Leonardo -- the same Center Avenue that continued through neighboring Atlantic Highlands -- when a stranger in a white Ford with a black ragtop pulled up alongside them. The driver just smiled, then drove on.

    When he returned moments later, he stuck his head out the window and asked, "Would you like a ride or would you rather walk?"

    "We'll walk, mister," Robin Spangenberg said, and the man drove off again.

    The third time he pulled up, he was more persistent. "Are you sure you don't want a ride?"

    "We're positive," Lydia Hardie said, and the girls started running toward home.

    "What bad little girls you are for not accepting my ride," the man said, and laughed.

    When Lydia got home and told her mother about the man, Barbara Hardie called the local police to report the incident.

    Her daughter's description of the driver matched the composite she was looking at now in the Daily Register. Bulky build. Chubby face. The style of sideburns people called mutton chops. The description of the car matched, too.

    Hardie picked up the phone and dialed the number for the Atlantic Highlands Police Department. Guzzi took the call.

    "Is there anything more you can tell me?" he asked when she finished her story.

    Her daughter had memorized the car's license plate, Hardie said. She had written it down.

    Guzzi ran the plate: CTI-109. The car was registered to a Julius Zarinsky of 402 Bower Street in Linden. Guzzi called the Linden Police Department.

    "Do you know the car?" he asked Lt. Joseph Intili.

    "Oh, yes," Intili replied. "We know the car."

    "The car belongs to the son, Robert," Intili said.

    "Robert Zarinsky."

    SOURCE NOTES

    All scenes described in this series are based on official documents, contemporary published accounts and interviews. Direct quotations are taken from court records, police reports or from interviews with the people who spoke the words.

    Given the passage of time, extra efforts were made to confirm quotations with the people to whom they are attributed. Where possible, quotations were cross-checked with others who may have heard them. Where the source or recollection of a quotation was imprecise, the words were paraphrased or omitted.

    Details of Rosemary Calandriello's disappearance and the police investigation that followed are taken from interviews with Sam Guzzi, the primary detective for the Atlantic Highlands Police Department, between August 2006 and August 2007; transcripts and notes of statements to Guzzi by Agnes Calandriello in August 1969; witness statements taken in August 1969 and included in police reports; transcripts of Agnes Calandriello's testimony in the 1975 trial of Robert Zarinsky for her daughter's murder; transcripts from the 1975 murder trial of testimony from the boys who were the last people to see Rosemary Calandriello on the day she disappeared -- Michael Hazeltine, Thomas Gowers, Darren Low and David Low; statements to police by Lydia Hardie and Robin Spangenberg in August 1969; investigative notes from Guzzi's files; and a story from the Daily Register of Red Bank dated Aug. 28, 1969.
     
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  8. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://charleyproject.org/case/rosemary-k-calandriello

    Rosemary K. Calandriello
    • [​IMG] [​IMG]
    • [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Rosemary, circa 1969; Robert Zarinsky in 1969; Zarinsky in 1975; Zarinsky, circa 2007


    • Missing Since08/25/1969
    • Missing FromAtlantic Highlands, New Jersey
    • ClassificationEndangered Missing
    • Age17 years old
    • Height and Weight5'5 - 5'7, 120 pounds
    • Clothing/Jewelry DescriptionA blue and yellow sleeveless shirt, yellow shorts and brown sandals.
    • Distinguishing Characteristics Caucasian female. Brown hair, brown eyes. Rosemary's hair was cut in a page boy at the time of her disappearance, and she wore thick eyeglasses. She has bushy eyebrows.

    Details of Disappearance
    Rosemary was last seen at her family's home in the 90 block of Center Avenue in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey at 6:00 p.m. on August 25, 1969. Her mother gave her two dollars and sent her out to buy milk and ice pops for the family's dinner.

    The store was only two blocks away, and Rosemary was expected to return home within a few minutes, but she never arrived. She has never been heard from again. Her mother reported her disappearance to the police two hours after she was last seen.

    Rosemary is the youngest of four children and the only child still living with her parents by the time of her disappearance. She had only recently started dating, had no steady boyfriend, and was generally kept very sheltered by her family. She was not allowed out at night without being accompanied by her parents, and she was afraid of the dark.

    At the time of her disappearance, her father was in poor health and had taken leave from his job as a result. Rosemary assumed many household responsibilities, including shopping for groceries and paying bills, due to her father's illness. Her parents never believed she ran away from home, as this was extremely uncharacteristic of her behavior.

    When authorities canvassed the area, they found four of Rosemary's high school classmates who claimed to have seen her riding in a car with a stranger, an older male. The vehicle was described as a beat-up black and white Ford Galaxy convertible. The boys followed the car in their own vehicle for a few blocks, because they were curious about seeing Rosemary with an older man.

    The police made a composite drawing of the unidentified man based off the boys' descriptions. After this sighting was reported in the newspapers, a woman told investigators that a man who closely resembled the sketch and drove a similar car had offered a ride to her twelve-year-old daughter and her daughter's friend. He made the offer on three separate occasions and also offered to give the girls some wine. The girls had memorized the vehicle's license plate and police determined it belonged to Robert Zarinsky. Photographs of him are posted with this case summary.

    Zarinsky had a history of antisocial and criminal behavior dating back to his childhood, and was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic. After linking him to Rosemary's disappearance, authorities arrested him for contributing to the delinquency of a minor. This charge was connected to his allegedly offering alcohol to the two underage girls, but police believed he had also harmed Rosemary.

    He was seen washing the trunk of his Ford Galaxy after Rosemary went missing, something he rarely did. When authorities inspected the car, the window and door handles on the passenger side were absent. One of Rosemary's hair clips was found on the floor of the vehicle, and in the backseat was a pair of blue women's panties. Rosemary's mother identified the panties as her daughter's, but Zarinsky's wife stated they were her own. A ball-peen hammer with a bloodstained hair stuck to the end was also located.

    After his arrest, Rosemary's four high school classmates identified Zarinsky as the man they had seen with her on the evening of her disappearance. While he was in jail, he allegedly confessed Rosemary's murder to a cellmate, and said no one would ever find her body.

    Zarinsky was convicted on the charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor, but his conviction was overturned on appeal and he was released. The FBI analyzed the bloody hair found in his car and linked it to another teenager, Linda Balabanow, whose body was found in the Raritan River in Port Reading, New Jersey four months before Rosemary disappeared. She had been strangled with an electrical cord.

    Authorities suspected Zarinsky had killed her and also murdered Joanne Delardo and Donna Carlucci, two teenage girls from Woodbridge Township, New Jersey, who were both also strangled with an electrical cord. There was not enough evidence to prosecute in any of the cases, however.

    In 1974, Zarinsky was charged with Rosemary's murder on the basis of circumstantial evidence. He was convicted in 1975 and sentenced to ninety-eight years in prison. He was the first person in the state of New Jersey to be convicted of murder in a case where the victim's body had not been found. In 1999, he was additionally charged with murder in the 1958 shooting death of Charles Bernoskie, a police officer. He was acquitted, but Bernoskie's widow won a $9.5 million civil judgement against him in 2003.

    At one of his parole hearings, Zarinsky stated he had killed Rosemary accidentally. He said he had driven her to a local lover's lane and she had gotten drunk and left his vehicle to relieve herself, and he accidentally backed over her and killed her. Prior to making this statement, for years he had denied having even ever met Rosemary.

    In April 2008, he was charged with murder in the 1968 death of a thirteen-year-old girl, Jane Durrua. She had been raped, beaten and strangled. He was awaiting trial for the murder when he died of pulmonary fibrosis in December 2008.

    Authorities believe Zarinsky was a serial killer; he is a suspect in several murders besides the ones he was charged with, and his own sister attributed as many as ten homicides to him.

    Rosemary's remains have never been located, but foul play is suspected in her case due to the circumstances involved.


    Investigating Agency
    • Atlantic Highlands Police Department 732-291-1212
    Source Information
     
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  9. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    upload_2018-7-30_18-22-29.jpeg

    upload_2018-7-30_18-22-57.jpeg
     
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  10. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    https://www.nytimes.com/1999/08/20/...-is-searched-for-clues-in-other-slayings.html

    Killer's House Is Searched for Clues in Other Slayings


    By ALAN FEUERAUG. 20, 1999

    Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
    A team of investigators using crowbars, handsaws and pickaxes tore through a house in this Union County city today, searching for evidence that might link its owner, already in jail for killing a teen-age girl in 1969, to the slayings of at least three more teen-age girls and a Rahway police officer.

    The owner of the house, Robert Zarinsky, has been in prison since 1975, serving a 98-year sentence for the murder of Rosemary Calandriello, a 17-year-old Atlantic Highlands girl, who disappeared after going to buy a carton of milk.

    Last week, Mr. Zarinsky became a suspect in the 1958 shooting death of Officer Charles Bernoskie when his sister, Judith Sapsa, implicated him. Mrs. Sapsa also told investigators that her brother might have been involved in the disappearance of as many as 10 teen-age girls, a law enforcement officer said.

    The search of the Linden house focused on the killing of Officer Bernoskie and the unsolved murders of three girls, ages 14 to 17, whose strangled bodies were found in Monmouth and Middlesex Counties between 1969 and 1974, officials said.

    Mr. Zarinsky had been a suspect in the deaths of the girls but there was not enough evidence to charge him, said John T. Mullaney, the assistant Monmouth County prosecutor who tried him in 1975.

    Continue reading the main story

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    Continue reading the main story

    ''I was convinced beyond a shadow of doubt that he was a serial killer,'' Mr. Mullaney said. ''We got him on one of the killings, which at least got him off the streets before more dead young girls started turning up.'' After Mr. Zarinsky was convicted of killing Miss Calandriello and sent to prison, the strangulation deaths in the region ended, Mr. Mullaney said.

    Even though Miss Calandriello's body was never found, Mr. Zarinsky was convicted after investigators found her underwear and some of her hair and her blood in his Ford Galaxie convertible.

    While the bodies of the other girls -- Linda Balabanow, 17, of Union Township; Doreen Carlucci, 14, of Woodbridge; and Joanne Delardo, 15, also of Woodbridge -- were found, investigators believe that Mr. Zarinsky's house may still contain clues as to how they died, said a Monmouth County law enforcement official.

    The Star-Ledger of Newark reported today that Mr. Zarinsky was also a suspect in the murder of a fourth girl, Ann Logan, a 19-year-old Seton Hall University student, who was found beaten to death and raped in Roselle in 1973. But officials refused to confirm the report.

    The house in Linden was first searched in 1975 when Mr. Zarinsky was arrested in the Calandriello killing, Mr. Mullaney said, but it was a limited search. Other than noting that Mrs. Sapsa had provided some information about the killings of Officer Bernoskie, officials in both Union and Monmouth Counties refused to say why they had returned to search again -- or what, if anything, had been found.


    By 3 P.M. today, however, investigators had packed up and left. Throughout the day, the whine of a saw was heard, three cardboard evidence boxes stood by the open front door and officers covered in dust came and went holding metal detectors and digging tools.

    The house, a modest three-story stone structure at 402 Bower Street that is surrounded by pine trees, has been vacant since Mr. Zarinsky's mother died in 1995. Nonetheless, he has had a friend maintain it and has chosen not to sell it even though he has more than 70 years remaining on his murder sentence, neighbors said.

    The most recent chapter in Mr. Zarinsky's story began on Aug. 13 when his cousin, Theodore Schiffer, 61, of Peckville, Pa., was arrested in the shooting of Officer Bernoskie on the basis of a sworn statement by Mrs. Sapsa.

    In her statement, Mrs. Sapsa said Mr. Schiffer and Mr. Zarinsky fatally shot the officer after he caught them trying to rob a Rahway car dealership. She also said that the two came home with gunshot wounds the night that Officer Bernoskie was shot and that her mother removed bullets from Mr. Zarinsky's buttocks and from Mr. Schiffer's chest.

    Mrs. Sapsa is under investigation in the theft of money from a mutual fund her mother set up for Mr. Zarinsky, the Monmouth County official said, adding that she turned in her brother and their cousin to avoid charges. Mrs. Sapsa's lawyer, Kenneth Weiner, is scheduled to meet with county prosecutors on Friday about the deaths of the teen-age girls, according to The Associated Press.

    For Mr. Zarinsky, the renewed allegations of murder come after a long life of trouble and crime. He spent time in the Trenton State Mental Hospital, Mr. Mullaney said, and called himself the leader of the ''American Republic Army,'' a largely fictional organization that was supposed to take over New Jersey and install him as king.

    In 1963, when he was 22, Mr. Zarinsky was convicted of desecrating several hundred tombstones in a Jewish cemetery in Linden. Seven years later, he was found guilty of attempted kidnapping after two Atlantic Highlands girls accused him of trying to lure them into his car, but the conviction was thrown out on appeal for lack of evidence, Mr. Mullaney said.

    Richard Idek, 57, who went to high school with Mr. Zarinsky in Linden, remembered him as a solitary, friendless man with a reputation for violence and rash behavior. Once, at a school assembly, Mr. Idek said, Mr. Zarinsky threw a globe stolen from the school library from the balcony of the hall into the crowd below.

    The renewed investigation has also troubled some of the family members of the slain girls. ''It's all pretty confusing to us right now because we had no idea any of this was going to take place,'' said Joanne Delardo's mother, who declined to give any more information, including her given name, before hanging up the phone.
     
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  11. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    http://newjersey.news12.com/story/3...lice-chief-remembered-as-law-enforcement-hero

    Law enforcement, family and friends are mourning the loss of the man credited with helping to solve a notorious New Jersey serial killer case.

    Samuel Guzzi was a former Monmouth County Prosecutor's Office agent.

    He also served as police chief in Atlantic Highlands for 33 years. He worked the 1969 kidnapping of Rosemary Calandriello.

    For years he investigated, eventually convicting Robert Zarinsky in the death of Calandirello.

    It was the state's first murder conviction without a body.

    In a post on Facebook, the Monmouth County Prosecutor's Office called Guzzi "a hero in law enforcement."

    Guzzi died last week at the age of 90.
     
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  12. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Robert Zarinsky

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    Akoya Bronze Member

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    Akoya Bronze Member

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    Akoya Bronze Member

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  16. Akoya

    Akoya Bronze Member

    Highlands, New Jersey

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    Navesink Twin Lights Highlands NJ

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    Akoya Bronze Member

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    Akoya Bronze Member

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