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Serial killer's drawings of his victims. Can we identify any of them?

Discussion in 'Unidentified General Information' started by Kimster, Feb 14, 2019.

  1. ima.grandma

    ima.grandma Believer of Miracles

    Part 3 from above
    In mid-2016, Miami-Dade Medical Examiner’s Office Investigator Brittney McLaurin, who specializes in identifying remains, had decided to review the case. She turned to NamUS, a national government Internet database that collects profiles of missing persons and unidentified bodies.

    She began searching for missing women with specific physical abnormalities — the unidentified petite woman was missing part of her left pinky finger, and had a surgically repaired hip. One name in the database stood out: Brosley.

    Her family revealed that Brosley, 33, of Boston, had accidentally amputated her pinky while cutting food. She had hip replacement surgery in 1968, the same year the hip plate found on the body was shipped to doctors. Brosley had vanished from Massachusetts in 1970.

    “There was some pretty standout similarities between her and the unidentified remains,” McLaurin said.

    A dentist also compared the body’s teeth to a photo of Brosley’s. They appeared a match. Based on the compelling circumstantial evidence, the Miami-Dade Medical Examiner’s Office in June 2017 officially identified the body as Brosley’s.

    Still, her family was guarded about the possibility that the killer might be found.

    “They had gone through so many years of losing hope,” Aguilar said.

    Finally, in October 2018, Denmark and Aguilar flew to Texas to interview Little. It was not a simple task.

    Over the months, Holland had built a rapport with Little and knew his every idiosyncrasy and habit — from his favorite foods to the time he liked to wake up. He was not willing to talk to every cop. But Holland vouched for the Miami-Dade detectives.

    Little lit up when Holland mentioned that the detectives had photos of his Miami victims. “Of my babies?” Little asked.

    Still, Holland warned them that Little could be mercurial, prone to cutting off an interview if he felt slighted. He didn’t like to talk about why or how he murdered his victims — and he felt offended at the suggestion he ever stabbed or shot anyone.

    Little was housed at the Wise County Jail, about an hour from Dallas. There, he had been given a small wing, complete with a makeshift art studio to craft images of his victims. The interview took place in a cramped, non-nondescript interview room.

    He did not look like a monster. Little was no longer the strapping boxer of the 1970s. He was balding, skinnier and frail. His health was failing. He was brought in on a wheelchair. He looked like an ordinary elderly grandpa.

    Until he spoke.

    ‘I knew she was leaving with me’

    Little remembered Brosley by her limp.

    He met her at a North Miami Beach bar, and thought she had a bad left leg. The woman, he recalled, was easy prey because she seemed troubled. Brosley told him she was from Massachusetts and had left because of strife with her family over alcoholism.

    ”Once she sat with me, I knew she was leaving with me,” Little said.

    For the detectives, the details were a stunning confirmation. Little did not know it, but Brosley’s relatives had already told them about her alcohol issues, and Brosley’s hip replacement.

    Brosley had left with him, driving away in his Oldsmobile, parking in the wooded area near Northwest 107th Avenue and 162nd Street, today a semi-rural industrial area.
    He remembered exact details about the scene, the clothes she wore and how he played with a chain around her neck — jewelry later found on the corpse. Even his description of the position of her body confirmed details from the old police files. Little normally didn’t bury his Florida victims. But he tried to bury Brosley — and grew annoyed that he’d left one of her legs exposed.

    As he spoke to detectives, his eyes grew wide. He began rubbing his crotch, the detectives remembered.

    Little, however, didn’t say how he murdered Brosley. As Little spoke rapidly, Aguilar gambled and casually asked. To his surprise, he spit it out.

    “He’s thinking to himself, as he’s playing with the chain, she’s got a nice neck and that he’s getting ready to kill her,” Aguilar recalled. “That he’s going to choke her until she dies.” A father and son out hunting later found Brosley’s body on Jan. 24, 1971.

    [​IMG]
    A Pascagoula Police Department mug shot of Samuel Little taken in 1988.PASCAGOULA POLICE DEPARTMENT

    CHAPMAN’S DEATH

    Little remembered Chapman’s murder scene because of “the arches.”

    A husband and wife collecting rocks and plants found Chapman’s decomposing corpse in a brush thicket on May 16, 1976.

    The body was near a canal off the Tamiami Trail near Krome Avenue. Little murdered her in the shadow of 70-foot-tall concrete arches that have become a local, if mysterious, icon — a rural spot where people used to picnic, hunt snakes and shoot guns (the arches were actually constructed as an entrance for a planned industrial park that was never built).

    The discovery was described in two paragraphs buried deep in the Miami Herald: “She had red, sandy blonde hair, was approximately five feet two, weighed 100 pounds, wore a red tube top and had a spoon ring on her right hand. No cause of death was apparent, Metro homicide detectives said.”

    Dr. Joseph Davis, the county medical examiner at the time, ruled she had been strangled.

    Chapman was a well-known prostitute who plied her trade at the Turf Motel and the Saxon Motel near Liberty City. One hotel owner said he’d last seen her with a tall black man with a bushy goatee who claimed to be an artist. With no witnesses and no suspects, the case went cold.

    Decades later, Little’s memories of her remain sharp.

    He recalled how he held Chapman under water “until she almost passed out” and then dragged her out to a canal and strangled her, according to the prosecutor’s memo. That matched the physical evidence — her brightly colored shorts had slipped off and were embedded in the canal bank.

    Detectives provided Little mugshots of Chapman and women from the time period. He immediately picked out Chapman.

    “He said, ‘There she is. There she is,’” Denmark said. “No hesitation.”

    Anyone with information on Chapman’s family can call Miami-Dade CrimeStoppers at 305-471-TIPS, or Miami-Dade’s homicide bureau at 305-471-240
     
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  2. ima.grandma

    ima.grandma Believer of Miracles

    Nearly 40 years after her death, the family of Anna Stewart finally knows who killed her. Prosecutors and police can close the books on this unsolved Cincinnati murder from 1981.

    Prosecutors and police flew to Los Angeles last month to interview the man the FBI calls the most prolific serial killer known in U.S. history, 78-year-old Samuel Little.

    At a prison north of Los Angeles, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters said Little detailed how he killed the 33-year-old Stewart and dumped her body in Grove City, Ohio, south of Columbus.

    Deters said Little also admitted killing a still-unknown woman -- a "Jane Doe" -- in Cincinnati between 1980 and 1990.

    "He agreed that he would confess to the murders he has committed as long as we don't seek the death penalty," Deters said in an exclusive interview with WCPO this week.

    Deters said he would never agree to that condition except in the time period when Little said he killed two women in Cincinnati.

    "We didn't have the death penalty, so it was a pretty easy decision to make," Deters said.

    RELATED PODCAST: Prolific serial killer strangled two in Cincy

    Little draws his victims. He writes notes on those pictures. And he remembers, in some cases, a lot of detail. Deters and police are hoping someone might recognize the "Jane Doe" in Little's drawing below.

    [​IMG]
    Little’s drawing of “Jane Doe” and digitally enhanced version.



    The FBI says it believes Little killed 93 women as he crisscrossed the United States for four decades. Little, who grew up in Lorain, Ohio, confessed to 90 killings between 1970 and 2005, the FBI said in November.

    "He floated around and killed girls," Deters said. "It takes a long time to kill 93 people. This is not like a weekend trip. He was doing it all the time."

    Stewart was last seen getting out of a cab at General Hospital (now UC Medical Center) on Oct. 6, 1981, according to a Cincinnati Post article at the time. Stewart told the cab driver she was going to see her sister in the hospital, according to police. Her body was found in Grove City six days later.

    Stewart left behind three young sons.

    "He is the epitome of evil," Deters said.

    Little’s modus operandi?

    [​IMG]
    Little’s drawing of Anna Stewart and Stewart’s photo



    "He always strangled the girls. Always. He never used a weapon," Deters said. "In our two cases he definitely strangled them."

    It's the second case that Deters and his team are most concerned with now. They want to know who “Jane Doe” is and where she is.

    Little has given them clues.

    His drawing of “Jane Doe” indicates that she wore a wig. Investigators say he told them he didn't have a pencil dark enough to illustrate the color of her skin, so the prosecutor's office digitally darkened her skin and tried to illustrate what she would look like without a wig.

    Little told investigators that “Jane Doe” was black, slender, wore glasses and lived in Over-the-Rhine with a “heavy female Hispanic.” Little said the street entrance to her apartment opened to a staircase to the second floor.

    Perhaps the most important clue, according to Deters, was that he left her beside a Kool cigarette billboard in Ohio.

    [​IMG]
    Little mugshots from 1972



    "He would prey on prostitutes and drug addicts," Deters said. "He would dump them in remote areas. And because he didn't use a weapon, he was able to conceal the cause of death."

    Deters believes Little strangled "Jane Doe" and he wonders if her body was found but not connected to Little. Deters’ fear is that ligature marks wouldn't be seen on a decomposed body and investigators examining her would have assumed she was the victim of an overdose, not the victim of a serial killer.

    Because of that, Deters has a team of interns combing through microfische of deaths from that time period matching the description Little gave his office.

    [​IMG]
    Little mugshots from 1977 and 1988



    Deters is expected to file an indictment against Little on both murders on Friday and expects Little to plead guilty in August. The prosecutor said Little is too ill to travel, so Judge Melba Marsh will take his guilty plea via a video chat service, such as Skype. According to Deters’ recollection, that’s never been done in Hamilton County.

    Deters asks anyone who knows anything about "Jane Doe" to contact one of the following:

    https://www.wcpo.com/news/crime/sam...-confesses-to-killing-two-women-in-cincinnati
     
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  3. KareBear

    KareBear Well-Known Member

    Snip ✂️
    With no one trying very hard to hold him accountable, Little's killing spree was rampant in Florida.

    In 1971, he killed Mary Brosley, 33, in northwest Miami-Dade County and left her body in a field, according to the Miami Herald. Five years later in the same area, he suffocated a sex worker named Angela Chapman, 25, near a canal and left her in the thicket to rot. Little strangled 20-year-old Rosie Hill, of Ocala, in 1982 and discarded her body by a hog pen, the Ocala Star-Banner reports.

    Little told New York magazine writer Jillian Lauren his first victim was "a big ol' blonde" from Coconut Grove on the New Year 1970.

    "She crossed them big legs in her fishnet stockings and touched her neck," Little told Lauren. "It was my sign. From God."

    The FBI says Little remembers his victims and the killings in detail. He can draw pictures of the women he's killed and remember what car he was driving, but the 78-year-old serial killer has a hard time remembering dates. Federal investigators say Little confessed to at least nine other murders in Florida in the following locations:

    - Plant City: A black woman was killed in 1977 or 1978. Little met the victim in Clearwater.
    - Fort Myers: A black woman was killed in 1984.
    - Tampa Bay: A black woman was killed in 1984.
    - Kendall: A white woman believed to be 45 years old was killed in 1973. The victim's name was possibly "Sarah" and she may have been from Massachusetts.
    - Miami: A 22-year-old black woman possibly named "Linda" was killed in 1971.
    - Miami: A black woman who was 28 years old was killed in 1971 or 1972. She possibly worked on the Homestead Air Force Base.
    - Miami: A black woman between 23-24 years old was killed by Little in the mid 1970s. She was possibly named "Emily" and worked at the University of Miami.
    - Miami: An 18-year-old black person who may have been a transgender woman or gender non-conforming person was killed in 1971 or 1972. The teenager was possibly called "Mary Ann" or "Marianne."
    - Homestead: A white woman was killed in 1970 or 1971.

    Little's last nine confessions regarding his Florida murders have not yet been definitively corroborated by law enforcement. The FBI is asking people with information to call 800-634-4097.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.orlandoweekly.com/Blogs/archives/2019/02/14/serial-killer-who-confessed-to-13-murders-in-florida-is-now-drawing-his-unidentified-victims?media=AMP+HTML
     
  4. ima.grandma

    ima.grandma Believer of Miracles

    A West Texas prosecutor said Friday that investigators have linked more than 60 killings in at least 14 states to a 79-year-old California inmate who may be the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.

    Ector County District Attorney Bobby Bland said Samuel Little continues to cooperate with investigators from around the country who interrogate him in prison about cold-case killings dating back to the 1970s. Among those who spoke to him were investigators from Ohio, where Little grew up and where he's suspected of killing at least five women.

    Little was convicted of killing three Los Angeles-area women and pleaded guilty to killing a Texas woman from Odessa, and he's serving life sentences in California. Little, who lived a nomadic lifestyle, claims to have killed 93 women as he crisscrossed the country over the years.
    Bland said Little is in failing health and has exhausted his appeals, leading him to be forthcoming with investigators.
    [​IMG]
    This combination of undated sketches provided by the FBI shows drawings made by admitted serial killer Samuel Little, based on his memories of some of his victims.
    (AP)
    "At this point in his life I think he's determined to make sure that his victims are found," he said.

    During Little's 2014 trial in Los Angeles, prosecutors said he was likely responsible for at least 40 killings since 1980. Authorities at the time were looking for possible links to deaths in Texas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio.

    But Little was not forthcoming with information at the time and Bland credits Texas Ranger James Holland with gaining Little's trust and eventually eliciting a series of confessions.

    Holland traveled to California last year to speak with Little about cold cases in Texas. That led Little to be extradited to Texas and his guilty plea in December in the 1994 strangulation death of Denise Christie Brothers in Odessa.

    Holland's conversations with Little have continued, even after Little was returned to California to serve his sentences, and it was Holland who determined that he was responsible for 93 deaths, said Bland, who received an update from Holland this week.

    Gary Ridgway, the so-called Green River Killer, pleaded guilty to killing 49 women and girls, making him the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history in terms of confirmed victims, though he said he killed 71.
    https://www.dallasnews.com/news/texas/2019/06/08/texas-prosecutor-60-deaths-now-linked-serial-killer
     
  5. ima.grandma

    ima.grandma Believer of Miracles

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