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The Frankston/Tynong North Serial Killer, 1980's

Discussion in 'Australia: Cold Cases' started by Lily, Mar 8, 2018.

  1. Lily

    Lily Bronze Member

    [​IMG]
    The victims of the Frankston and Tynong North murders: (Top) Allison Rooke, Bertha Miller, Catherine Headland, (Bottom) Ann-Marie Sargent, Nuramol Stephenson, Joy Summers.


    Person of interest in six Frankston murders tells A Current Affair he’s innocent



    The man named by police as a person of interest in the infamous Tynong North and Frankston murders has told A Current Affair’s Laura Turner that he is innocent and had nothing to do with the deaths of six women in the 1980s.

    Harold Janman, a man long connected to the police investigation, told A Current Affairthat he wasn’t the type of person to commit murder.

    “I couldn’t kill an animal, let alone a person,” Mr Janman said.

    “I have never hated a person or disliked them enough to wish them dead and take their life."

    The murders of Allison Rooke, Bertha Miller, Catherine Headland, Ann-Marie Sargent, Narumol Stephenson and Joy Summers were thrust back in the spotlight last year when police offered a $6 million reward for information leading to an arrest.

    Former homicide detective Brendon Cole, who investigated the murders, said the now 85-year-old Mr Janman had been a focus of police during the time of the initial investigations.

    “Janman became a focus of attention because of his strange behaviour in the Frankston area,” Mr Cole said.
    “He'd been seen pulling up at bus stops and talking to middle aged women. They'd be walking down the street and he would, what we say 'gutter crawl'."

    Janman vehemently denied offering women lifts and failing two lie detector tests, when questioned by A Current Affair.
     
    Kimster likes this.
  2. Lily

    Lily Bronze Member

  3. Lily

    Lily Bronze Member

    "On the balance of probabilities, the same person or persons were responsible for the murders of Allison Rooke, Bertha Miller, Catherine Linda Headland, Ann-Marie Sargent and Joy Carmel Summers." It did not have enough facts to draw conclusions regarding Stephenson's murder.

    The review examined several suspects but declared the "best nominated" was Harold John Janman, a former projectionist with a propensity for offering women lifts in his car and with links to both Tynong North and Frankston. But interesting links are not evidence and Janman, now aged 85, has always declared his innocence.


    Bertha Miller, 73, the aunt of then chief commissioner Mick Miller, left for church on Sunday, August 10, 1980, intending to take a tram along High Street, Glen Iris. Her body was found off Brew Road, Tynong North, in December 1980.

    Eighteen days later Catherine Linda Headland, 14, was heading to catch the bus to the Fountain Gate shopping complex. Her body was found at Tynong North near Miller's.

    Ann-Marie Sargent, 18, disappeared after intending to catch a bus to the Dandenong office of the Commonwealth Employment Service and then visit the Clyde post office on October 6, 1980. Her body was found with the remains of Miller and Headland in December 1980.

    Joy Carmel Summers' body was found on November 22, 1981.

    Police believe the dumping ground was selected by someone who knew the area well.

    Narumol Stephenson, 34, disappeared from her car outside a Brunswick flat on November 29, 1980. Her body was found about 100 metres off the Princes Highway, near Brew Road, on February 3, 1983.

    Police use a scrub-clearing machine in their hunt for clues in the Tynong North area where the three bodies were found in 1980.

    Allison Rooke, 59, left her Frankston home to go shopping on May 30, 1980, walking to the nearby Frankston-Dandenong Road to catch a bus. Her body was found on July 5, 1980, hidden in scrub near Skye Road, Frankston.

    Joy Carmel Summers, 55, was to have caught a bus on the Frankston-Dandenong Road on October 9, 1981. On November 22, 1981, her body was found in scrub beside Skye Road.

    ----
    A 1990 re-examination by the same agency rejected the "three killers" theory. "On the balance of probabilities, the same person or persons were responsible for the murders of Allison Rooke, Bertha Miller, Catherine Linda Headland, Ann-Marie Sargent and Joy Carmel Summers." It did not have enough facts to draw conclusions regarding Stephenson's murder.

    The review examined several suspects but declared the "best nominated" was Harold John Janman, a former projectionist with a propensity for offering women lifts in his car and with links to both Tynong North and Frankston. But interesting links are not evidence and Janman, now aged 85, has always declared his innocence.

    And so what do we know about Janman?

    He presents as a deeply religious family man and a prude who would turn "girlie" photos to the wall in the small city projection room where he worked, and yet he had been charged with soliciting for the purposes of prostitution the year before the murders commenced.

    It was also around that time, he would later tell police, that "my wife was going to leave me".

    He freely admitted that he often offered women lifts on the Frankston-Dandenong Road, where Rooke and Summers disappeared in 1980 and 1981. He agreed to drive with police down the busy road and identify where he invited women into his van. He indicated nine stops, including the two where Rooke and Summers would have been waiting for a bus.

    But he was not so forthcoming on every question.

    Detective: "Do you know where Skye Road is?"

    Janman: "Where sir?"

    Detective: "Skye Road."

    Janman: "No sir, I have never heard of it."

    And yet for years he had worked as a projectionist at the local drive-in just off Skye Road, near where the bodies were found.

    Police took him to where the bodies were found. "[He] became nervous and sweated a lot. He walked around the sites as asked, but at no time did he walk in the immediate vicinity of where the bodies had been lying. Extensive areas around the sites had been cleared of bush and scrub by the police crime scene searchers and the investigators stated that without some prior knowledge it would not have been possible to tell exactly where the two bodies had been lying," according to a police analysis.

    Three days after the interview and on the anniversary of the discovery of the first body at Tynong, Janman turned up unannounced at the Frankston police station to ask Senior Constable Michael White: "You know I was brought in about two murders in Frankston, well why haven't I been asked about five murders instead of two?"

    White: "Which other ones are you talking about?"

    Janman: "The ones in Tynong … I'm just saying, why haven't they asked about that?"

    The trouble was no one, at least publicly, had at that time linked the two murder scenes. No one, that is, except Janman.

    According to FBI crime profiler Robert Ressler, serial killers often reach out to investigators: "Some offenders attempt to inject themselves into the investigation of the murder, or otherwise keep in touch with the crime in order to continue the fantasy that started it."

    It is a matter of fact that after Janman was interviewed on December 3, 1981, the murders stopped - a fact that may, of course, be entirely coincidental.

    Fifteen years after the last body was found, Janman was nabbed in St Kilda when he approached an undercover policewoman and asked for sex. He immediately told police he was "the prime suspect in the Tynong North killings".

    Homicide investigators try to find links between where bodies are discovered and the offender, as in most cases killers return to areas they know.

    Janman had lived in Garfield, the area adjoining the killer's dumping ground. He had worked at a nearby hotel and was a truck driver whose route took him to the Brew Road sand quarry where three of the victims' bodies were dumped.

    In a subsequent taskforce investigation, codenamed Lyndhurst, Janman agreed to two polygraph tests. He failed both.


    https://www.theage.com.au/national/...h-hunt-for-serial-killer-20171019-gz49pa.html
     
    Kimster likes this.
  4. Kimster

    Kimster Director Staff Member

    There are some people who can't pass a poly for whatever reason, I get that.

    What are the laws there on collecting DNA, Lily? I think you've told me before, but I can't remember.
     
    Lily likes this.
  5. Lily

    Lily Bronze Member

    AFAIK, the police can get a court order to take samples from anyone suspected of a serious crime like murder - but have to destroy the sample after 12 months if there's no charges.

    Edit: and senior officers can take 'non-intimate' (I would assume head-hair and the like) samples without a court order)

    I'm not sure of the status of the DNA in this case, will have to look about for that.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
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